Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

A serious and committed Spanish friar who takes over Father Dámaso’s post in San Diego as the town’s priest. Fray Salví is a meticulous and cunning man who uses his religious stature for political influence, benefitting both himself and the church. He is often at odds with the town’s military ensign, volleying back and forth for power over San Diego and its citizens. While preaching, he will often have his sextons (people who tend the church grounds) lock the doors so that listeners, and especially the ensign, must sit through long sermons. Unlike other priests, he refrains from frequently beating noncompliant townspeople, though he applies excruciating might on the rare occasions he does resort to violence. On the whole, though, he asserts his influence by engineering behind-the-scenes plans to defame his enemies. For instance, to ruin Ibarra—who is engaged to María Clara, the woman Father Salví secretly loves—he organizes a violent rebellion against the Civil Guards and frames Ibarra as the ringleader. Just before the bandits descend upon the town, Salví rushes to the ensign’s house and warns him of the imminent attack, thereby portraying himself as a hero concerned with the town’s wellbeing.
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Father Salví Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character Father Salví appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 11: Sovereignty
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...visits. As such, there is a constant struggle for power between the town’s priest, Father Salví, and its military ensign. Father Salví takes his job very seriously, but the ensign finds... (full context)
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...interferes with the citizens’ ability to attend church services at the appropriate times. In retaliation, Salví lets his goat run free on the ensign’s property. When he sees the ensign enter... (full context)
Chapter 13: The Storm Brews
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Enraged, Ibarra leaves the graveyard. About to come upon his house, he sees Father Salví walking in the opposite direction. Although the two men have never met, Ibarra stops the... (full context)
Chapter 17: Basilio
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...while his mother prays. In his dreams, he sees the chief sexton, the priest (Father Salví), and Crispín, who trembles in fright and looks for a place to hide. Furious, the... (full context)
Chapter 18: Souls in Torment
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The next day, Father Salví is in a noticeably bad mood, which churchgoers recognize by the way he delivers mass.... (full context)
Chapter 19: Adventures of a Schoolmaster
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The schoolmaster tells Ibarra that even the new priest, Father Salví, interferes in the classroom, often reminding the teacher that his first duty is to teach... (full context)
Chapter 22: Light and Shadow
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...María Clara arrives with Aunt Isabel, and the townspeople notice a profound difference in Father Salví, who seems distracted during his sermons and becomes thinner. Even more notably, he stays out... (full context)
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...outing with friends the next day. María Clara pleads with Ibarra to not let Father Salví come, because he’s always watching her with “sad, sunken eyes” that unnerve her. “He once... (full context)
Chapter 24: In The Forest
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Father Salví rushes through his morning mass and other religious duties in order to meet up with... (full context)
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During the dinner, Father Salví asks the ensign if he knows anything about a criminal who apparently attacked Father Dámaso... (full context)
Chapter 29: Morning
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...from his post as deputy mayor because the mayor is controlled too much by Father Salví. Meanwhile, the church fills up for the festival’s concluding high mass. Unfortunately, it seems as... (full context)
Chapter 32: The Crane
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After the church service ends, everybody makes their way to the school because Father Salví is set to deliver a ceremony to bless the structure. The yellow man has created... (full context)
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After Father Salví blesses the school, the revered Captain General says a few words before the town’s most... (full context)
Chapter 40: Right and Might
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...that they postpone discussing the matter until after the festival. When the performance starts, Father Salví stares at María Clara with his sunken eyes. At a certain point, the priest approaches... (full context)
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Watching this chaotic scene, Father Salví thinks he sees Ibarra pick up María Clara and run away with her. Because he... (full context)
Chapter 42: The De Espadañas
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...remains with the couple. At lunch, Linares asks after Father Dámaso and learns from Father Salví that the priest will be stopping by that afternoon. As Doña Victorina eagerly introduces María... (full context)
Chapter 43: Plans
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...for a moment about where he might find Linares a wife. As he thinks, Father Salví watches from afar. “I didn’t think it would be so difficult,” Dámaso says to himself,... (full context)
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Having heard this exchange between Father Dámaso and Linares, Father Salví paces back and forth until a man greets him. It is Lucas, and he tells... (full context)
Chapter 44: An Examination of Conscience
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...the surprise of Doctor de Espadaña, who has prescribed a simple marshmallow syrup regimen. Father Salví attributes this improvement to religion, for he took María Clara’s confession. As he debates with... (full context)
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...But her woe falls away for the last five, which puzzles her aunt. When Father Salví comes and takes the young woman’s confession, he looks deeply into her eyes. Upon leaving,... (full context)
Chapter 51: Changes
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As Linares worries, Father Salví arrives at the same time as Captain Tiago. The friar tells Tiago that Ibarra’s excommunication... (full context)
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...speaks in private with Sinang, who tells him that María Clara—who has just overheard Father Salví talking with Tiago—says it would be best if he forgot about her. She also tells... (full context)
Chapter 54: Quid Quid Latet
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Father Salví rushes to the ensign’s house and tells him that the town is in great danger.... (full context)
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In exchange for this information, Father Salví requests that the ensign let it be known that he—Salví—was the one to uncover the... (full context)
Chapter 55: Catastrophe
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In Captain Tiago’s house, Father Salví paces nervously back and forth, not wanting to leave. María Clara and Sinang whisper, acknowledging... (full context)
Chapter 57: Vae Victis
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...interrogation and torture of the prisoners. The court—which includes the ensign, the mayor, and Father Salví—brings out Társilo for questioning. He says that Ibarra never contacted him or his peers, insisting... (full context)
Chapter 58: The Accursed
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...streets. The townspeople insult Ibarra, calling him a heretic and hurling stones at him. Father Salví pretends to be sick and closes himself away in the parish house. Those who once... (full context)
Chapter 59: Homeland and Interests
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...Ibarra’s supposed uprising, using it as an excuse to throw celebratory religious feasts. “Long live Salví!” they chant. Meanwhile, Captain Tinong laments the downfall of his friend Tiago, realizing that he... (full context)
Chapter 60: María Clara Weds
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...hero. Indeed, he has been promoted to a commanding lieutenant. Turning his attention to Father Salví, the ensign says that he’s heard the priest is leaving San Diego. Salví acknowledges this,... (full context)
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...he landed in such unfavorable and compromising circumstances. He casts a stern gaze at Father Salví, who turns away. Hearing this, María Clara drops the flowers she’s holding and goes perfectly... (full context)
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...of the prosecutors in court. At this, Guevara falls silent and looks meaningfully at Father Salví before leaving. (full context)
Epilogue
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...starting with Father Dámaso, who travels to Manila when María Clara enters the convent. Father Salví also goes to Manila, where he waits in vain to be made a bishop. Months... (full context)