The character of La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña in Noli Me Tangere from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes
Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña Character Analysis

A Filipina woman married to Don Tiburcio. Above all else, Doña Victorina cares about her image as a beautiful and admired socialite, though she is actually—as Rizal goes out of his way to emphasize—past her prime. She is only in her thirties but looks much older, and she quickly adopts the latest trends, often changing her patterns of speech to reflect the sound of high society members. It is her idea to have Don Tiburcio treat María Clara. She also encourages him to bring along his respectable nephew Linares, whom she is eager to pair off with María Clara when Captain Tiago—whose advances she denied as a young woman because he was Filipino and not Spanish—calls off the wedding between his daughter and Ibarra.

La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña Quotes in Noli Me Tangere

The Noli Me Tangere quotes below are all either spoken by La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña or refer to La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Books edition of Noli Me Tangere published in 2006.
Chapter 42 Quotes

The servants all had to call them by their new titles and, as a result as well, the fringes, the layers of rice powder, the ribbons, and the lace all increased in quantity. She looked with increasing disfavor than ever before on her poor, less fortunate countrywomen, whose husbands were of a different category from her own. Every day she felt more dignified and elevated and, following this path at the end of a year she began to think of herself of divine origin.

Nevertheless, these sublime thoughts did not keep her from getting older and more ridiculous every day. Every time Captain Tiago ran into her and remembered that he had courted her in vain, he would right away send a peso to the church for a mass of thanksgiving. Despite this, Captain Tiago had great respect for her husband and his title “Specialist in All Types of Diseases” and he would listen attentively to the few sentences his stuttering permitted him to utter successfully. For this reason, and because he didn’t visit absolutely everyone like other doctors did, Captain Tiago chose him to attend his daughter.

Page Number: 284
Explanation and Analysis:
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La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character La Doctora Victorina de los Reyes de Espadaña appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: Dinner
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
...showing an unwillingness to be reprimanded by their priests. Similarly, a class-conscious woman named Doña Victorina criticizes the lieutenant behind his back for frowning the entire night. Later that evening, the... (full context)
Chapter 42: The De Espadañas
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
The festival finally over, Captain Tiago invites Doctor de Espadaña and his wife, Doña Victorina, to stay with them while the doctor treats María Clara, who is still ill. Doña... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
With the de Espadañas is Don Tiburcio’s Spanish nephew, Linares, whom Victorina has convinced to travel to the Philippines in order to escort her to Spain. This... (full context)
Chapter 44: An Examination of Conscience
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...this improvement to religion, for he took María Clara’s confession. As he debates with Doña Victorina about the value of religion over science, María Clara’s friends urge her to take one... (full context)
Chapter 47: Two Ladies
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
While the men of San Diego place their bets in the gambling house, Doña Victorina walks through town dressed in ribbons and flowers. She walks with her husband, who fails... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
When the fight ends, Doña Victorina tells Don Tiburcio that he will have to challenge the ensign to a duel in... (full context)
Chapter 51: Changes
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Back in town, Linares frets about Doña Victorina’s demand that he duel with the ensign. After reading a letter from Victorina—very poorly spelled... (full context)
Chapter 60: María Clara Weds
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...that Ibarra will be hanged. The de Espadañas return to visit Tiago again, and Doña Victorina has adopted a new way of speaking, an imitation of a southern Spanish person’s lisp—she... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
While Doña Victorina and Captain Tiago discuss plans for María Clara and Linares’s wedding, Aunt Isabel comforts her... (full context)