Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

An elderly lieutenant of the Civil Guard who deeply respects both Ibarra and the late Don Rafael. Guevara tells Ibarra that he appreciated his father’s conviction and moral compass, which went against the church and Father Dámaso’s oppressive dominance. He is also the one to inform Ibarra about what exactly happened between Don Rafael and Father Dámaso.

Señor Guevara Quotes in Noli Me Tangere

The Noli Me Tangere quotes below are all either spoken by Señor Guevara or refer to Señor Guevara. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Books edition of Noli Me Tangere published in 2006.
Chapter 4 Quotes

In addition, Don Rafael was an honest man, more just than many men who go to confession. He held himself up to a rigorous moral standard and when the unpleasantness began he often said to me: “Señor Guevara, do you think God pardons a crime, a murder, for example, solely because one tells it to a priest, who is, in the end, a man, and who has the duty to keep it to himself, and who is afraid of burning in hell, which is an act of attrition, who is a coward, and certainly without shame? I have another conception of God,” he would say, “to me one does not correct one wrong by committing another, nor is one pardoned by useless weeping or by giving alms to the church.” He gave this example: “If I kill the head of a family, if I make a woman into a destitute widow and happy children into helpless orphans, will I have satisfied eternal justice if I let them hang me, or confide my secret to someone who has to keep it to himself, or give alms to the priests, who need it the least, or buy myself a papal pardon, or weep night and day? And what about the widow and children? My conscience tells me I should replace as much as possible the person I have murdered and dedicate myself completely and for my whole life to the welfare of the family whose misfortune I have created. And even then, even then, who will replace the love of a husband and father?”

Related Characters: Señor Guevara (speaker), Juan Crisóstomo Ibarra y Magsalin (Ibarra), Father Dámaso, Don Rafael Ibarra
Page Number: 26
Explanation and Analysis:

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To be a heretic anywhere is a great disgrace, especially at that time, when the mayor made a great show of his religious devotion and prayed in the church with his servants and said the rosary in a great loud voice, perhaps so that everyone could hear him and pray with him. But to be a subversive is worse than being a heretic and killing three tax collectors who know how to read, write, and sign their names. Everyone deserted him. His papers and books were confiscated. They accused him of subscribing to the Overseas Mail, of reading the Madrid newspapers, of having sent you to German Switzerland, of having been in possession of letters and a portrait of a condemned priest, and who knows what else! They found accusations in everything, even of his wearing a peninsular-style shirt. If he had been anyone other than your father, he would have been set free almost immediately, especially since a doctor had attributed the death of the unfortunate tax collector to a blockage. But because of his wealth, his confidence in justice, and his hatred of anything that was not legal or just, they ruined him.

Related Characters: Señor Guevara (speaker), Juan Crisóstomo Ibarra y Magsalin (Ibarra), Father Dámaso, Don Rafael Ibarra, The Mayor
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

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Señor Guevara Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character Señor Guevara appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: A Gathering
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...mill about, groups of soldiers, European travelers, and priests speak to one another. An old lieutenant in the Civil Guard engages in conversation with a quiet but argumentatively cunning Dominican friar... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...says, “The governors support the heretics against God’s own ministers!” This seems to unnerve the lieutenant, who begins to stand and asks Dámaso to clarify. “I mean that when a priest... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
As Father Dámaso and the lieutenant approach the possibility of a fistfight, Father Sibyla intervenes with philosophical and diplomatic reasoning. The... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Continuing with his story, the lieutenant says that Father Dámaso exhumed this distinguished man’s body from the cemetery. The Captain General... (full context)
Chapter 2: Crisóstomo Ibarra
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Puzzled, Ibarra turns around to find the lieutenant behind him. “Young man,” says the lieutenant, “are you Don Rafael Ibarra’s son?” Ibarra confirms... (full context)
Chapter 3: Dinner
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...seat. At one point, unable to make a decision, they offer the seat to the lieutenant, saying, “Lieutenant, here we are in the world, not in the church. Here the seat... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...his glass and says “I give you Spain and the Philippines!” Everybody follows suit. The lieutenant, though, drinks but doesn’t repeat the phrase. (full context)
Chapter 4: Heretic and Subversive
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
As Ibarra walks home that night, the lieutenant catches up to him. His name is Señor Guevara, and he explains the circumstances of... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Lieutenant Guevara explains that around the time Don Rafael refused to go to confession, there was a... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
Continuing his story, Guevara explains that Don Rafael rushed the collector to the courthouse, but it was too late.... (full context)
Chapter 60: María Clara Weds
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
Overhearing a conversation about Ibarra’s fate, the lieutenant Señor Guevara angrily juts in, saying that it is only because Ibarra trusted the wrong... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
One of the people speaking with Señor Guevara brings up the point that one of the bandits said Ibarra was the ringleader of... (full context)
Isolation Theme Icon
On his way out, Señor Guevara stoops to whisper to María Clara, who has been listening to his conversation about Ibarra.... (full context)