Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

A Spaniard in charge of the Civil Guard in San Diego. The ensign has a bitter relationship with Father Salví, since he thinks Father Salví takes his position too seriously. To retaliate against Salví (who uses his religious authority to control the ensign), the ensign enforces curfews that make it difficult for the citizens of San Diego to attend church at the proper times. Given to excessive drinking and unnecessary displays of power, the ensign is married to a strong-willed Filipina woman named Doña Consolación, with whom he fights day in and day out.
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The Ensign Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character The Ensign appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 11: Sovereignty
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...is a constant struggle for power between the town’s priest, Father Salví, and its military ensign. Father Salví takes his job very seriously, but the ensign finds this characteristic aggravating, thinking... (full context)
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To undermine the friar, the ensign imposes a curfew that interferes with the citizens’ ability to attend church services at the... (full context)
Chapter 21: A Mother’s Tale
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...where she remains for several hours while the soldiers wait for further orders from the ensign, who seems to know nothing about the situation. When the ensign finally arrives, he quickly... (full context)
Chapter 24: In The Forest
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...group, he sees that the majority of the town is there, including his nemesis the ensign, the mayor, Don Filipo, and even Captain Basilio, who was Don Rafael’s enemy in a... (full context)
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During the dinner, Father Salví asks the ensign if he knows anything about a criminal who apparently attacked Father Dámaso on the road... (full context)
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...who they tell Ibarra is the same boatman he saved earlier that day. Because the ensign recently left the party, the sergeant explains the encounter that the ensign had with Elías... (full context)
Chapter 25: At the Philosopher’s House
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...his encounter with Elías—the boatman—from “the Muse of the Civil Guard,” his term for the ensign’s wife, Doña Consolación, whom Ibarra neglected to invite to his party. Insulted, Doña Consolación heard... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Sermon
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Father Dámaso begins the sermon in Latin before transitioning to Spanish, lightly demeaning the ensign and the Civil Guard. At one point, he pauses, but not because he wants to... (full context)
Chapter 34: The Banquet
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...then come to the table, each one announcing the same news to the governor, the ensign, and the mayor. Again, the friars are insulted by having been excluded. (full context)
Chapter 39: Doña Consolación
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While the town celebrates, the ensign’s house remains dark. Inside, Doña Consolación sleeps in an armchair in unbecoming clothing. That morning,... (full context)
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...she now sings sad songs that Doña Consolación hears. “Get her up here immediately!” the ensign’s wife orders her servants. When the madwoman arrives, Doña Consolación uses poor Tagalog to order... (full context)
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...and more blood from Sisa, taking a wicked pleasure in the deranged spectacle until the ensign comes in and puts his hand on the dancing woman’s shoulder, allowing her to stop.... (full context)
Chapter 40: Right and Might
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...of the Civil Guard approach him and ask him to stop the performance because the ensign and his wife “have had a fistfight and can’t sleep.” Don Filipo refuses to do... (full context)
Chapter 47: Two Ladies
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...for her on their way by. She becomes even angrier when they come upon the ensign and he doesn’t compliment her dress. As they go by the ensign’s house, they see... (full context)
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...the fight ends, Doña Victorina tells Don Tiburcio that he will have to challenge the ensign to a duel in order to defend her honor. When he doesn’t agree, she decides... (full context)
Chapter 51: Changes
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Back in town, Linares frets about Doña Victorina’s demand that he duel with the ensign. After reading a letter from Victorina—very poorly spelled and full of absurd claims—he wonders who... (full context)
Chapter 54: Quid Quid Latet
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Father Salví rushes to the ensign’s house and tells him that the town is in great danger. Before revealing the nature... (full context)
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In exchange for this information, Father Salví requests that the ensign let it be known that he—Salví—was the one to uncover the plot. The ensign assures... (full context)
Chapter 55: Catastrophe
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...the barracks, where guards have captured the rebels. He goes to the court, and the ensign declares that nobody is permitted to leave town that night. Ibarra makes haste to his... (full context)
Chapter 57: Vae Victis
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...is delighted to witness the interrogation and torture of the prisoners. The court—which includes the ensign, the mayor, and Father Salví—brings out Társilo for questioning. He says that Ibarra never contacted... (full context)
Chapter 58: The Accursed
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The ensign marches the prisoners, including Ibarra, into the streets. The townspeople insult Ibarra, calling him a... (full context)
Chapter 60: María Clara Weds
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...they’ll die of envy!” she says. The next night, Tiago hosts a party, where the ensign brags about the battle, portraying himself as a great hero. Indeed, he has been promoted... (full context)
Epilogue
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...nun that he shuts himself off from the world and becomes an opium addict. The ensign, basking in his newfound glory, goes to Spain, leaving behind Doña Consolación, who succumbs to... (full context)