North and South

North and South

by

Elizabeth Gaskell

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John Thornton Character Analysis

Thornton is a successful, self-made manufacturer in Milton and Margaret’s eventual love interest. About 30 years old, he is “neither exactly plain, nor yet handsome,” and is “not quite a gentleman,” according to Margaret. He has a resolute, inflexible personality, though he can show warmth and kindness to individuals. Thornton’s father committed suicide following some foolish financial gambles when Thornton was very young, forcing the boy to find work in a draper’s shop and support Mrs. Thornton and his sister Fanny on a very small income. Even then, he formed the habit of scrupulously saving money, enabling him to work his way up to his current prominence. Despite his success, he is aware of the deficits in his education, so he hires Mr. Hale to tutor him in the classics. When he first meets Margaret, he is struck by her queenly bearing, yet equally put off by what he interprets as her prideful air of superiority. Because of his own success, he believes that any decent poor person should be able to raise himself in a similar fashion; failure to do so, in his view, indicates poverty of character. His antagonistic view of the classes earns Margaret’s scorn. After Margaret physically defends him during the strikers’ riot, though, he confesses his love to her and proposes marriage, but is haughtily rejected. Though their friendship is strained by the rejection and their frequent arguments over trade, Thornton also calls off the investigation into Leonards’ death in order to spare Margaret, though he questions her virtue until he finally learns the whole truth of the matter. After Margaret leaves Milton, Thornton’s mill fails, due to aftereffects of the strike and his own overambitious mistakes. However, he refuses to join in Watson’s risky speculations and makes sure he pays everyone he owes. Instead, he decides to pursue experimental practices which involve much closer cooperation with workers. Margaret agrees to use her fortune, which she inherited from Mr. Bell, to help Thornton regain Marlborough Mills, and they finally admit their love for one another.

John Thornton Quotes in North and South

The North and South quotes below are all either spoken by John Thornton or refer to John Thornton. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Nostalgia and Identity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of North and South published in 1996.
Chapter 10 Quotes

“It is one of the great beauties of our system, that a working-man may raise himself into the power and position of a master by his own exertions and behavior; that, in fact, every one who rules himself to decency and sobriety of conduct, and attention to his duties, comes over to our ranks; it may not be always as a master, but as an overlooker, a cashier, a book-keeper, a clerk, one on the side of authority and order.”

“You consider all who are unsuccessful in raising themselves in the world, from whatever cause, as your enemies, then, if I understand you rightly,” said Margaret in a clear, cold voice.

“As their own enemies, certainly,” said he…

Related Characters: Margaret Hale (speaker), John Thornton (speaker)
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

“Given a strong feeling of independence in every Darkshire man, have I any right to obtrude my views, of the manner in which he shall act, upon another…merely because he has labor to sell, and I capital to buy?”

“Not in the least,” said Margaret, determined just to say this one thing; “not in the least because of your labor and capital positions, whatever they are, but because you are a man, dealing with a set of men over whom you have, whether you reject the use of it or not, immense power; just because your lives and your welfare are so constantly and intimately interwoven. God has made us so that we must be mutually dependent. We may ignore our own dependence, or refuse to acknowledge that others depend upon us in more respects than the payment of weekly wages; but the thing must be, nevertheless.”

Related Characters: Margaret Hale (speaker), John Thornton (speaker)
Page Number: 122
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

“Mr. Thornton,” said Margaret, shaking all over with her passion, “go down and face them like a man. Save these poor strangers, whom you have decoyed here. Speak to your workmen as if they were human beings. Speak to them kindly. Don’t let the soldiers come in and cut down poor creatures who are driven mad. I see one there who is. If you have any courage or noble quality in you, go out and speak to them, man to man.”

Related Characters: Margaret Hale (speaker), John Thornton, John Boucher
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:

If she thought her sex would be a protection,—if, with shrinking eyes she had turned away from the terrible anger of these men, in any hope that ere she looked again they would have paused and reflected, and slunk away, and vanished, she was wrong. Their reckless passion had carried them too far to stop—at least had carried some of them too far; for it is always the savage lads, with their love of cruel excitement, who head the riot—reckless to what bloodshed it may lead…

“For God’s sake! Do not damage your cause by this violence. You do not know what you are doing.”

Related Characters: Margaret Hale (speaker), John Thornton
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 39 Quotes

“Yo’ve called me impudent, and a liar, and a mischief-maker, and yo’ might ha’ said wi’ some truth, as I were now and then given to drink. An’ I ha’ called you a tyrant, an’ an oud bull-dog, and a hard, cruel master; that’s where it stands. But for th’ childer. Measter, do yo’ think we can e’er get on together?”

“Well!” said Mr. Thornton, half-laughing, “it was not my proposal that we should go together. But there’s one comfort, on your own showing. We neither of us can think much worse of the other than we do now.”

Related Characters: John Thornton (speaker), Nicholas Higgins (speaker)
Page Number: 319
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

“If we do not reverence the past as you do in Oxford, it is because we want something which can apply to the present more directly. It is fine when the study of the past leads to a prophecy of the future. But to men groping in new circumstances, it would be finer if the words of experience [from history] could direct us how to act in what concerns us most intimately and immediately; which is full of difficulties that must be encountered; and upon the mode in which they are met and conquered—not merely pushed aside for the time—depends our future. Out of the wisdom of the past, help us over the present. But no! People can speak of Utopia much more easily than of the next day’s duty; and yet when that duty is all done by others, who so ready to cry, ‘Fie, for shame!’”

Related Characters: John Thornton (speaker), Mr. Bell
Page Number: 327
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 51 Quotes

“I have arrived at the conviction that no mere institutions, however wise…can attach class to class as they should be attached, unless the working out of such institutions bring the individuals of the different classes into actual personal contact. Such intercourse is the very breath of life…I would take an idea, the working out of which would necessitate personal intercourse; it might not go well at first, but at every hitch interest would be felt by an increasing number of men, and at last its success in working come to be desired by all, as all had borne a part in the formation of the plan; and even then I am sure that it would lose its vitality, cease to be living, as soon as it was no longer carried on by that sort of common interest which invariably makes people find means and ways of seeing each other, and becoming acquainted with each other’s characters and persons…We should understand each other better, and I’ll venture to say we should like each other more.”

Related Characters: John Thornton (speaker), Margaret Hale, Mr. Colthurst
Page Number: 421
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 52 Quotes

“They are from Helstone, are they not? I know the deep indentations round the leaves. Oh! Have you been there? When were you there?”

“I wanted to see the place where Margaret grew to what she is, even at the worst time of all, when I had no hope of ever calling her mine. I went there on my return from Havre.”

“You must give them to me,” she said, trying to take them out of his hand with gentle violence.

“Very well. Only you must pay me for them!”

Related Characters: John Thornton (speaker), Margaret Hale
Related Symbols: Nature and the Countryside
Page Number: 425
Explanation and Analysis:
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John Thornton Character Timeline in North and South

The timeline below shows where the character John Thornton appears in North and South. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4
Class Antagonism Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
...many a man at Oxford is.” In particular, Mr. Bell has recommended his tenant Mr. Thornton, who seems to be an intelligent man. Mr. Hale hopes that his life will be... (full context)
Chapter 7
Personal Character, Environment, and Change Theme Icon
...can search for a house, and so that Mr. Hale can meet his pupil, Mr. Thornton. On the approach to Milton, they see a “deep lead-colored cloud” hanging over the horizon.... (full context)
Female Agency and Strength Theme Icon
...the hotel for lunch and goes to speak to the landlord, Margaret discovers that Mr. Thornton has been waiting for them in the hotel. Margaret goes in to see him with... (full context)
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Personal Character, Environment, and Change Theme Icon
When Margaret tells Thornton about the house they are renting, he knows the place. Now having seen Margaret, “with... (full context)
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After Thornton and Margaret make halting attempts at conversation, Mr. Hale returns, and Thornton revises his opinion... (full context)
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When Margaret further describes Thornton as a “tradesman,” Mr. Hale corrects her, saying that the Milton manufacturers are very different... (full context)
Chapter 8
Class Antagonism Theme Icon
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...schooling early in order to enter trades, and some of them young men who, like Thornton, want to resume their disrupted education. Mr. Thornton is Mr. Hale’s oldest pupil and also... (full context)
Chapter 9
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The next day, Mr. Hale announces, to Mrs. Hale’s dismay, that he has invited Mr. Thornton to tea for that night. Based on her earlier interaction with him, Margaret wryly describes... (full context)
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Meanwhile, in the Thornton house, Mr. Thornton is having a conversation with his mother. Mrs. Thornton sniffs at the... (full context)
Chapter 10
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When Thornton arrives at the Hales’, he is struck by the fact that, although his own drawing-room... (full context)
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Margaret, too, observes Thornton, and notices the difference in both appearance and character between him and Mr. Hale. Her... (full context)
Class Antagonism Theme Icon
Mr. Hale and Mr. Thornton are discussing the steam-hammer. Thornton describes the advance of industry as “the war which compels,... (full context)
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...with such a “sullen sense of injustice” in their expression as Milton’s poor do. Mr. Thornton regrets having hurt her feelings, but suggests that, if he does not understand the South,... (full context)
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Thornton goes on to admit that, in their early days, Milton’s manufacturers were dizzied by their... (full context)
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...inquires whether it is necessary to conceive of the relationship between classes as a “battle.” Thornton believes it to be “as much a necessity as that prudent wisdom and good conduct... (full context)
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One of the benefits of the industrial system, Thornton explains, is that a worker can raise himself to the level of master through his... (full context)
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Thornton feels that the only way to explain his meaning is to tell the Hales something... (full context)
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Thornton does not feel that his present fortune has come about through luck, merit, or talent,... (full context)
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When Thornton leaves, he approaches Margaret to shake hands. She is not prepared for this and bows... (full context)
Chapter 11
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After Thornton leaves, Margaret remarks that she liked Thornton’s account of being a shop-boy better than anything... (full context)
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Mr. Hale fills in some of what Thornton had declined to share—namely, that his father had committed suicide after engaging in wild financial... (full context)
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...position as a Milton manufacturer.” When Mr. Hale asks what she means, Margaret says that Thornton measures everything by the standard of wealth, judging others because they lack his own character... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Though Thornton has asked her to, Mrs. Thornton is reluctant to call on Mrs. Hale and Margaret.... (full context)
Class Antagonism Theme Icon
Personal Character, Environment, and Change Theme Icon
...rack her brain to sustain a conversation with Fanny, who was very young during the Thorntons’ years of poverty and seems to know little of hardship or struggle. The subject of... (full context)
Chapter 15
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The next day Mr. Hale and Margaret walk to the Thorntons’ to return Mrs. Thornton’s call. When they arrive at Marlborough Mills, they must walk past... (full context)
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When Mrs. Thornton comes in, Margaret gives a halting account of Mrs. Hale’s illness, not wanting to distress... (full context)
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The three discuss Mr. Thornton’s love of his studies with Mr. Hale. Mrs. Thornton says that study of the classics... (full context)
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When Margaret suggests that a variety of interests helps to avoid rigidity of mind, Mrs. Thornton says that Thornton only needs to pursue one interest: “to hold and maintain a high,... (full context)
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Mr. Hale and Margaret are aware that they had never heard of Mr. Thornton until Mr. Bell had mentioned his name, and that Mrs. Thornton’s world “was not their... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton retorts that Bell can know little of Thornton, since he lives “a lazy life in... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton mentions that a strike has been threatened in Milton. Margaret asks what the people are... (full context)
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Margaret asks whether this environment of struggle does not make Milton very rough. Mrs. Thornton says that of course it does, and she describes a time that she was forced... (full context)
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That evening, Mr. Thornton visits the Hales, bringing the address of a doctor Mrs. Thornton has recommended. Mr. Hale... (full context)
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Margaret mentions that she finds Milton “strange.” When Thornton asks why, she explains that she has never seen “a place before where there were... (full context)
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...antagonism between the employer and the employed” that he has observed, and even inferred from Thornton’s own statements. Mr. Thornton considers this and responds that he considers his interests to be... (full context)
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Thornton says that he does consider the workers to be like children, though he does not... (full context)
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Mr. Thornton argues that he would not feel justified in taking too great an interest in the... (full context)
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Thornton continues to argue that he has no right to press his views on independent Darkshire... (full context)
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Thornton asks whether Margaret is ever conscious of being influenced by others, and whether that influence... (full context)
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...in pursuit of their rights, I may safely infer that the master is the same.” Thornton, miffed, replies that she is just like everyone else who fails to understand the industrial... (full context)
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...of despotism with your respect for other men’s independence of character.” Irritated by her tone, Thornton reiterates that he chooses to be “the unquestioned…master” of his men during working hours, and... (full context)
Chapter 18
Religious Diversity and Conscience Theme Icon
...and anxious for his wife. They have received an invitation to a dinner at Mrs. Thornton’s, and Mrs. Hale is insistent that Margaret and Mr. Hale should go without her. (full context)
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At the Thorntons’ the next evening, Mrs. Thornton, John Thornton, and Fanny discuss the dinner RSVPs. Mrs. Thornton... (full context)
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After pacing awhile, Thornton abruptly tells Mrs. Thornton that he wishes she would like Margaret. Surprised, she asks whether... (full context)
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Thornton changes the subject to the strike, which he’s certain is imminent. He explains what he... (full context)
Chapter 19
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...gloom has descended on Milton because of the strike. Mr. Hale often talks with Mr. Thornton about the underlying economic principles of the strike. When Margaret listens to these conversations, she... (full context)
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Margaret is both grateful for Thornton’s compassion for her dying mother and resentful of his knowledge of Mrs. Hale’s condition. She... (full context)
Chapter 20
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Mr. Hale and Margaret go to the Thorntons’ dinner party. Margaret is struck by the excessive ornament, “a weariness to the eye,” and... (full context)
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When Mr. Thornton comes in, he is struck anew by Margaret’s dignified beauty. During the dinner, Margaret, too,... (full context)
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After dinner, Thornton approaches Margaret. They begin to discuss the question of what constitutes a “gentleman.” Thornton thinks... (full context)
Chapter 21
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Margaret and Mr. Hale talk about Thornton as they walk home. Mr. Hale thinks that Thornton looked anxious that evening. Margaret is... (full context)
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Margaret replies that Thornton is the first manufacturer that she’s had the opportunity to know, so it’s not surprising... (full context)
Nostalgia and Identity Theme Icon
...Mrs. Hale rallies slightly over the next few days. Dr. Donaldson sends Margaret to the Thorntons’ to inquire about a water-bed Mrs. Thornton might lend them to enhance Mrs. Hale’s comfort. (full context)
Chapter 22
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In the Thorntons’ drawing-room, Margaret sits alone for a while until Fanny comes in. Fanny explains that Thornton... (full context)
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When Thornton comes in, he has a look of defiance on his face that makes him seem... (full context)
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When the crowds knock the gate down, Fanny faints, and Mrs. Thornton carries her from the room. Margaret, however, won’t leave Thornton’s side. Out the window, Margaret... (full context)
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Thornton reassures Margaret that the soldiers will arrive soon “to bring [the crowd] to reason…the only... (full context)
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Thornton’s face clouds over as he listens to her, and he agrees. Margaret bolts the door... (full context)
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...go away peaceably. A man asks if the Irish workers will be sent packing. When Thornton says, “Never, for your bidding,” the crowd lets loose in angry hooting. Margaret sees the... (full context)
Female Agency and Strength Theme Icon
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...begin to retreat, but not before a man shouts, “Th’ stone were meant for thee [Thornton]; but thou wert sheltered behind a woman!” (full context)
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As the crowd vanishes, Margaret briefly comes to, but swoons again. Thornton carries her into the house. He confesses his love to the insensible Margaret: “No one... (full context)
Female Agency and Strength Theme Icon
While Mrs. Thornton goes for a doctor, one of the serving-maids bathes Margaret’s forehead and tells Fanny, who... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Mr. Thornton returns, after securing a good meal and a priest to help pacify the Irish workers.... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton successfully dissuades Thornton from going to see Margaret that night. Later that night, however, Thornton... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton says that Margaret obviously does care for Thornton, and admits that she likes Margaret better... (full context)
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...is too tired to go to her. She feels ashamed for “disgracing” herself by defending Thornton as she did. She thinks that she could not have shown such courage for anyone... (full context)
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Thornton sends the water-bed for Mrs. Hale, as well as a message specifically asking how Margaret... (full context)
Chapter 24
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The next morning, Margaret resolves not to think about the Thornton family, planning to visit Bessy instead. Soon, however, Mr. Thornton arrives and asks to see... (full context)
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Margaret stands before Thornton like someone “falsely accused of a crime that she loathed and despised.” When Thornton begins... (full context)
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Unable to keep the tenderness from his voice, Thornton tells Margaret that he chooses to believe he owes her his life—“to the one whom... (full context)
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...She would more readily have sympathized with any other man in the crowd than with Thornton. (full context)
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Thornton scorns her “misplaced sympathies,” now believing that her “innate sense of oppression” motivated Margaret’s noble... (full context)
Chapter 25
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Margaret can’t help comparing Thornton’s proposal to that of Henry Lennox the year before. The biggest difference, she thinks, is... (full context)
Chapter 26
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Mr. Thornton stumbles away from the Hales’ house overwhelmed with heartbreak, feeling as though Margaret had become... (full context)
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Mr. Thornton walks briskly through the fields, reflecting on what a fool he’s been and how little... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton has sat in her dining room all day, bracing herself for news of her son’s... (full context)
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When Thornton gets home, he tells Mrs. Thornton that no one cares for him but her. When... (full context)
Chapter 27
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After Thornton returns from his countryside foray, his mind is clearer, and he immerses himself once again... (full context)
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Thornton warmly presents the fruit basket to a delighted Mrs. Hale, but quickly leaves without acknowledging... (full context)
Chapter 28
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...things, so that they might better understand one another’s point of view. Margaret doubts that Thornton could be persuaded. Hearing Thornton’s name, Higgins complains that Thornton ought to have made sure... (full context)
Chapter 29
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Mr. Thornton enters as she says this, and Margaret feels embarrassed that she may have offended him.... (full context)
Chapter 31
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When Frederick idly mentions getting a glimpse of Thornton at the door and thinking him “a shopman,” Margaret feels annoyed and wants to correct... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...early at the train station and have a tender last exchange. Suddenly they spot Mr. Thornton riding past, scowling. Margaret also notices a young man staring impertinently at her when she... (full context)
Chapter 33
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...Bell is too ill to come to the funeral, and Margaret is upset that Mr. Thornton proposes to accompany Mr. Hale instead. (full context)
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After the funeral, Mr. Thornton approaches Dixon to ask how Mr. Hale and Margaret are doing. He is disappointed to... (full context)
Chapter 35
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Meanwhile, Mr. Hale and Thornton have a quiet and consoling chat that knits them more firmly together in friendship—Thornton, “man... (full context)
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As Thornton leaves the Hales’, he meets the police inspector, whom Thornton had helped to get his... (full context)
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Thornton goes home and agonizes over the events—has Margaret behaved improperly or not? What kind of... (full context)
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Thornton sends a note to the police inspector: “There will be no inquest,” since the dead... (full context)
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Margaret’s relief is clouded by the realization that Thornton had seen her at the train station and now believes her “degraded”—“she suddenly found herself... (full context)
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...the truth—a failure of her trust in God, she believes, resulting in this abasement before Thornton. (full context)
Chapter 37
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Margaret’s thoughts return to Thornton and her disgrace in his eyes. She feels strangely disappointed when Thornton doesn’t appear for... (full context)
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Margaret asks Higgins if he would consider asking Thornton for work. Higgins says it would “tax [his] pride,” and he wouldn’t do it for... (full context)
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Margaret says that if only Higgins would speak to Thornton as he does to them, and if only Thornton would listen “with his human heart,... (full context)
Chapter 38
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What Margaret doesn’t know is that Thornton’s change of opinion about her is not just due to the fact that she lied,... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton has heard about Margaret’s presence at the train station scuffle. She believes that Margaret has... (full context)
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Mrs. Thornton feels more bitter than ever towards Margaret. She even feels “a savage pleasure” at the... (full context)
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When Mrs. Thornton arrives at the Hales’, Margaret has just finished relating Mrs. Hale’s last days in a... (full context)
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Instead, Mrs. Thornton speaks of the “indiscretion” of walking after dark with a young man. Margaret immediately turns... (full context)
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Meanwhile, Higgins keeps his promise to Margaret, waiting for hours to speak to Thornton. Thornton’s business is running behind because of disruptions related to the strike, and he is... (full context)
Chapter 39
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As Margaret goes over her conversation with Mrs. Thornton, she is distressed all over again to realize that Thornton must believe Frederick to have... (full context)
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...finds him playing with some of the Boucher children; he describes his unsatisfactory conversation with Thornton but repeats that he would “break stones on the road” before he’ll allow these children... (full context)
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Thornton is equally uncomfortable at unexpectedly seeing Margaret. He has come to Higgins because he believes... (full context)
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Higgins speaks fiercely to Thornton at first, but Thornton says that he has spoken as he had no right to... (full context)
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Thornton follows Margaret when he sees her coming out of the Bouchers’ house. He tells her... (full context)
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...that the Lennoxes might move back to Harley Street. Unable to escape from hearing about Thornton or from her own confusing feelings, she finds herself yearning for the “placid tranquility of... (full context)
Chapter 40
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Thornton procrastinates about coming to the Hales’ and conducting business with his landlord, Bell, because he’s... (full context)
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Thornton is irritated by Bell’s playful tone. He argues that “we are a different race from... (full context)
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...that Milton men do, in fact, reverence the past; they are “regular worshippers of Thor.” Thornton replies that Milton men think differently about the past than Oxford scholars do: “to men... (full context)
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Later that evening, when Bell comments on Thornton’s irritability and lack of humor, Margaret comes to his defense, saying Thornton wasn’t himself. Later,... (full context)
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The winter passes monotonously after Bell’s visit. Higgins works steadily for Thornton, commenting to the Hales that Thornton is like “two chaps”—one the master of industry, the... (full context)
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Thornton, meanwhile, seldom visits the Hales anymore, to Mr. Hale’s regret. One evening he abruptly asks... (full context)
Chapter 41
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...in her own problems, beginning by chatting with Martha, her serving-maid, who reports that Fanny Thornton is soon to be married to a rich manufacturer. (full context)
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Margaret visits Higgins next, who reports that his new master, Thornton, is “good enough to fight wi’, but too good…to be cheated.” He has one of... (full context)
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On the train, Bell unexpectedly sees Thornton. Thornton is silent with shock at the news of Mr. Hale’s death and wonders, trembling,... (full context)
Chapter 42
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...Milton, to retrieve Margaret. Margaret finally finds the relief of tears on her aunt’s shoulder. Thornton inquires at the house, without seeing Margaret, and invites Mr. Bell to stay with him.... (full context)
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As Bell, Thornton, and Mrs. Thornton chat at the Thorntons’ house, Bell makes a passing reference to Frederick,... (full context)
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Thornton talks about his acquaintance with Higgins—“a strange kind of chap”—and the brainstorm Thornton had to... (full context)
Chapter 43
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...taking with her a drinking-cup to remind her of Bessy. Then she reluctantly visits Mrs. Thornton, who shows greater warmth now that Margaret is leaving, and apologizes for her manner the... (full context)
Chapter 46
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...to the police inspector. She explains that in her haste to protect Frederick, she gave Thornton reason to suspect ill of her. She begs Mr. Bell to speak to Thornton about... (full context)
Chapter 48
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...to hope for news that Mr. Bell has gone to Milton and spoken to Mr. Thornton, and that the trip to Spain might yet happen. Finally, she receives a letter announcing... (full context)
Chapter 49
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...of London) instead. Her heart continues to ache over the unresolved issue between herself and Thornton, but she assumes it is too late to be fixed.  She finally sets this anxiety... (full context)
Chapter 50
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...Milton. Due to speculative financial ventures, some Milton businesses face the prospect of failure. Even Thornton is “hard pressed.” He has aspired to make a name for himself internationally, but like... (full context)
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Until Thornton got to know Higgins, he and his fellow townsmen and factory workers have led parallel... (full context)
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Thornton’s business has been damaged by the strike and by the fact that much of his... (full context)
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One day Higgins asks Thornton whether he’s heard anything of Margaret recently and notices how Thornton’s face lights up at... (full context)
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One morning, after a sleepless night poring over his books, Thornton unburdens himself to Mrs. Thornton, explaining that he no longer dreads any outcome for his... (full context)
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Thornton at last has to give up his business. His brother-in-law Watson’s speculation succeeds spectacularly, and... (full context)
Chapter 51
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When Margaret comes in, Edith informs her that Henry has invited Thornton to dinner. Margaret tries to get out of the dinner-party, but Edith insists that she’s... (full context)
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Later that evening, Lennox hears Mr. Colthurst asking questions that might embarrass Thornton and tries to intercept the conversation. But Thornton doesn’t shrink from acknowledging that he’s been... (full context)
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Thornton explains his newfound conviction that “no mere institutions, however wise…can attach class to class as... (full context)
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When questioned, Thornton explains that he doesn’t expect such practices to prevent strikes, but merely to “render strikes... (full context)
Chapter 52
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...Henry tells Edith to stop hoping that he and Margaret will marry. He is bringing Thornton with him the next day for another meeting. (full context)
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The next day Thornton comes, though without Lennox. Margaret hurries in late, flustered. She tells Thornton she is sorry... (full context)
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Margaret hides her face as Thornton repeats her name. Finally, the third time, she hides her face on his shoulder, and... (full context)
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Thornton says he has something to show her, and withdraws some dried roses from his pocket-book.... (full context)