Northanger Abbey

Northanger Abbey

Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) Character Analysis

Henry Tilney is the second son of General Tilney and is Catherine Morland’s love interest. Like Catherine’s father, he works as a parson in a rural community. He is witty, charming, and perceptive, with a much larger frame of reference and experience than Catherine has, but is also sincere and loyal. He is especially concerned for his sister Eleanor’s happiness and welfare. Unlike his father, he is unconcerned with becoming even richer than he is already.

Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) Quotes in Northanger Abbey

The Northanger Abbey quotes below are all either spoken by Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) or refer to Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Northanger Abbey published in 2003.
Volume 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

Isabella was very sure that he must be a charming young man and was equally sure that he must have been delighted with her dear Catherine, and would therefore shortly return. She liked him the better for being a clergyman, “for she must confess herself very partial to the profession” and something like a sigh escaped her as she said it. Perhaps Catherine was wrong in not demanding the cause of that gentle emotion—but she was not experienced enough in the finesse of love, or the duties of friendship, to know when delicate raillery was properly called for, or when a confidence should be forced.

Related Characters: Catherine Morland, Isabella Thorpe, James Morland, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney)
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:

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Volume 1, Chapter 10 Quotes

“You will allow, that in both, man has the advantage of choice, woman only the power of refusal; that in both, it is an engagement between man and woman, formed for the advantage of each; and that when once entered into, they belong exclusively to each other till the moment of its dissolution; that it is their duty, each to endeavour to give the other no cause for wishing that he or she had bestowed themselves elsewhere, and their best interest to keep their own imaginations from wandering towards the perfections of their neighbours, or fancying that they should have been better off with any one else.”

Related Characters: Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) (speaker), Catherine Morland, John Thorpe
Page Number: 74
Explanation and Analysis:

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Volume 1, Chapter 14 Quotes

But Catherine did not know her own advantages—did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances are particularly untoward. In the present instance, she confessed and lamented her want of knowledge; declared that she would give any thing in the world to be able to draw; and a lecture on the picturesque immediately followed, in which his instructions were so clear that she soon began to see beauty in every thing admired by him, and her attention was so earnest, that he became perfectly satisfied of her having a great deal of natural taste.

Related Characters: Narrator (speaker), Catherine Morland, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney)
Page Number: 106-107
Explanation and Analysis:

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Volume 2, Chapter 4 Quotes

“My dear Miss Morland,” said Henry, “in this amiable solicitude for your brother's comfort, may you not be a little mistaken? Are you not carried a little too far? Would he thank you, either on his own account or Miss Thorpe's, for supposing that her affection, or at least her good-behaviour, is only to be secured by her seeing nothing of Captain Tilney? Is he safe only in solitude?—or, is her heart constant to him only when unsolicited by any one else?—He cannot think this—and you may be sure that he would not have you think it. I will not say, 'Do not be uneasy' because I know that you are so, at this moment; but be as little uneasy as you can. You have no doubt of the mutual attachment of your brother and your friend; depend upon it therefore, that real jealousy never can exist between them; depend upon it that no disagreement between them can be of any duration. Their hearts are open to each other, as neither heart can be to you; they know exactly what is required and what can be borne; and you may be certain, that one will never tease the other beyond what is known to be pleasant.”

Related Characters: Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) (speaker), Catherine Morland, Isabella Thorpe, James Morland, Frederick Tilney (Captain Tilney)
Page Number: 144
Explanation and Analysis:

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

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Volume 2, Chapter 9 Quotes

“If I understand you rightly, you had formed a surmise of such horror as I have hardly words to—Dear Miss Morland, consider the dreadful nature of the suspicions you have entertained. What have you been judging from? Remember the country and the age in which we live. Remember that we are English, that we are Christians. Consult your own understanding, your own sense of the probable, your own observation of what is passing around you—Does our education prepare us for such atrocities? Do our laws connive at them? Could they be perpetrated without being known, in a country like this, where social and literary intercourse is on such a footing; where every man is surrounded by a neighbourhood of voluntary spies, and where roads and newspapers lay every thing open? Dearest Miss Morland, what ideas have you been admitting?”

Related Characters: Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) (speaker), Catherine Morland, General Tilney, Mrs. Tilney
Related Symbols: Old Buildings / Northanger Abbey
Page Number: 186
Explanation and Analysis:

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Volume 2, Chapter 10 Quotes

Charming as were all Mrs. Radcliffe's works, and charming even as were the works of all her imitators, it was not in them perhaps that human nature, at least in the midland counties of England, was to be looked for. Of the Alps and Pyrenees, with their pine forests and their vices, they might give a faithful delineation; and Italy, Switzerland, and the South of France, might be as fruitful in horrors as they were there represented. Catherine dared not doubt beyond her own country, and even of that, if hard pressed, would have yielded the northern and western extremities. But in England it was not so; among the English, she believed, in their hearts and habits, there was a general though unequal mixture of good and bad. Upon this conviction, she would not be surprized if even in Henry and Eleanor Tilney, some slight imperfection might hereafter appear and upon this conviction she need not fear to acknowledge some actual specks in the character of their father, who, though cleared from the grossly injurious suspicions which she must ever blush to have entertained, she did believe, upon serious consideration, to be not perfectly amiable.

Related Characters: Catherine Morland (speaker), Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney), General Tilney, Eleanor Tilney (Miss Tilney)
Page Number: 188
Explanation and Analysis:

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Volume 2, Chapter 11 Quotes

He went; and, it being at any time a much simpler operation to Catherine to doubt her own judgment than Henry's, she was very soon obliged to give him credit for being right, however disagreeable to her his going. But the inexplicability of the General's conduct dwelt much on her thoughts. That he was very particular in his eating, she had, by her own unassisted observation, already discovered; but why he should say one thing so positively, and mean another all the while, was most unaccountable! How were people, at that rate, to be understood? Who but Henry could have been aware of what his father was at?

Related Characters: Catherine Morland, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney), General Tilney
Page Number: 198
Explanation and Analysis:

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Volume 2, Chapter 15 Quotes

She was assured of his affection; and that heart in return was solicited, which, perhaps, they pretty equally knew was already entirely his own; for, though Henry was now sincerely attached to her, though he felt and delighted in all the excellencies of her character and truly loved her society, I must confess that his affection originated in nothing better than gratitude, or, in other words, that a persuasion of her partiality for him had been the only cause of giving her a serious thought. It is a new circumstance in romance, I acknowledge, and dreadfully derogatory of an heroine's dignity; but if it be as new in common life, the credit of a wild imagination will at least be all my own.

Related Characters: Narrator (speaker), Catherine Morland, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney)
Page Number: 227
Explanation and Analysis:

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The General, accustomed on every ordinary occasion to give the law in his family, prepared for no reluctance but of feeling, no opposing desire that should dare to clothe itself in words, could ill brook the opposition of his son, steady as the sanction of reason and the dictate of conscience could make it. But, in such a cause, his anger, though it must shock, could not intimidate Henry, who was sustained in his purpose by a conviction of its justice. He felt himself bound as much in honour as in affection to Miss Morland, and believing that heart to be his own which he had been directed to gain, no unworthy retraction of a tacit consent, no reversing decree of unjustifiable anger, could shake his fidelity, or influence the resolutions it prompted.

Related Characters: Catherine Morland, John Thorpe, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney), General Tilney
Page Number: 230-231
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Volume 2, Chapter 16 Quotes

To begin perfect happiness at the respective ages of twenty-six and eighteen, is to do pretty well; and professing myself moreover convinced, that the General's unjust interference, so far from being really injurious to their felicity, was perhaps rather conducive to it, by improving their knowledge of each other, and adding strength to their attachment, I leave it to be settled by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.

Related Characters: Catherine Morland, Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney), General Tilney
Page Number: 235
Explanation and Analysis:

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Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) Character Timeline in Northanger Abbey

The timeline below shows where the character Henry Tilney (Mr. Tilney) appears in Northanger Abbey. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Volume 1, Chapter 3
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
...introduced by the ballroom’s master of the ceremonies to a twenty-four or twenty-five-year-old man named Mr. Tilney , with whom she dances. After dancing, Mr. Tilney and Catherine sit and talk, and... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Mr. Tilney parodies the usual small talk of strangers who become acquainted in Bath, asking Catherine about... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...Allen interrupts their conversation by asking Catherine to help fix a pin in her sleeve. Mr. Tilney engages Mrs. Allen in a detailed conversation about fabrics, saying that he sometimes buys them... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...before a gentleman does, the Narrator says it “cannot be ascertained” whether Catherine dreamt about Mr. Tilney even before he had ever dreamt of her, which would probably be improper. Mr. Allen... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 4
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Catherine eagerly looks for Mr. Tilney the next day in the “Pump-room,” but he is nowhere to be seen. More luckily,... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 5
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...at the theater, Catherine nods pleasantly across the room to Isabella, while also looking for Mr. Tilney . She looks for him again the next day, which the Thorpes and Allens spend... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 6
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...think of one man. Catherine says that Isabella should not encourage her to think about Mr. Tilney because he may never return. Isabella says she is sure Catherine would be miserable if... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...then after Catherine responds Isabella notes that Catherine's description matches the description she gave of Mr. Tilney exactly. Isabella describes the complexion she prefers in a man, then says that Catherine must... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 8
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...occurs in the life of a heroine, observes the Narrator. After ten minutes, Catherine sees Mr. Tilney across the room, but he does not see her. Mr. Tilney is talking to a... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Mr. Tilney gives Catherine a smile of recognition, then approaches her party along with Mrs. Hughes, a... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
...and dogs. Catherine is not comforted in her loss of an opportunity to dance with Mr. Tilney , and looks back at him frequently. Catherine is also separated from Isabella and James... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...Catherine points Miss Tilney out to Isabella, who exclaims at her beauty and asks where Mr. Tilney is. When James tries to join the conversation, Isabella scolds, saying that they are not... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
John has walked away and Catherine hopes Mr. Tilney will ask her to dance again, so she returns to the older women, hoping to... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
...offer to walk about and tease people. The rest of the night, she hardly sees Mr. Tilney or Miss Tilney, and Isabella gives her very little attention. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 9
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...Allen ran into Mrs. Hughes in the Pump-room and then walked on the Crescent with Mr. Tilney and Miss Tilney. Mrs. Allen talked to Mrs. Hughes a great deal, but can remember... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 10
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...attract all the men. Her brother is already in love with Catherine, she says, and Mr. Tilney has proved he loves her by having come back to Bath. She asks if Mr.... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...conversation is very common, they both speak with uncommon sincerity. Catherine talks about how well Mr. Tilney dances, explains why she could not dance with him at the ball, and asks about... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...she fears will ask her to dance again, making it impossible for her to accept Mr. Tilney ’s offer if he asks her. Isabella says that, despite how improper it may seem,... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
Once John is gone, Mr. Tilney says he nearly got quite angry at John for interrupting them on the way to... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
Mr. Tilney asks Catherine if she is enjoying Bath as much as she was when he first... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...dance, Catherine sees a handsome older man looking at her, and who then whispers to Mr. Tilney . She worries that there is something odd in her appearance drawing his attention. Mr.... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...Catherine chats with Miss Tilney and they agree to take a country walk together with Mr. Tilney the next day, if it does not rain. The Tilneys are to call for Catherine... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 11
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...they ride by and asks Catherine who it is; Catherine turns and sees Eleanor and Henry Tilney walking down the street. Catherine shouts for John to stop the carriage so that... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 12
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
During the fifth act, however, Catherine sees Henry Tilney. He bows at her without smiling. Very distressed, Catherine feels no angry pride, only... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 13
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...thinks it is very unkind of Isabella to draw everyone’s attention to her feelings for Mr. Tilney . (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 14
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
The next morning, Henry (Mr. Tilney), Eleanor (Miss Tilney), and Catherine take their country walk. Catherine comments that a... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...no longer pity the writers of histories for writing books used to torture little children. Henry says that she is using the words “torment” as a synonym for “instruction,” and she... (full context)
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Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
Henry and Eleanor begin to discuss the landscape from the point of view of those who... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...of London. Eleanor is alarmed, thinking that Catherine is still talking about current events, but Henry understands that Catherine is not predicting that there will be a riot, but instead anticipating... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 1
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...to herself that she did not have a nice time. She feels less well-acquainted with Henry and Eleanor at the end of her visit than she did before. She feels that... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
...Tilney had ignored her. Catherine denies these characterizations of the visit, but Isabella says that Henry Tilney is unworthy of Catherine, and adds that she and her brother would never treat... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
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...let Isabella’s assessment influence her, and she is happy to be asked to dance by Henry and warmly greeted by Eleanor that night at a ball. Also at the ball is... (full context)
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Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
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Captain Tilney asks Henry to ask Catherine if she thinks Isabella would object to dancing with him. Catherine says... (full context)
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Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
Catherine is very shocked to see Isabella dance with Captain Tilney. Henry Tilney observes her surprise but says that he is not surprised at all. Afterwards, Isabella... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 2
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
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Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
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...engagement can come about, but she hardly thinks of more than the pleasure of seeing Henry Tilney sometimes and speculates very little about the future. She joyfully tells Eleanor Tilney that... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...the prospect of staying in an abbey as she is about spending more time with Henry Tilney. She hopes that she will learn that the building was the scene of some... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 4
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
Catherine speaks to Henry Tilney and asks him to tell Captain Tilney that Isabella is engaged to James. Henry... (full context)
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...agrees that Isabella’s behavior has been bad, but insists that Isabella loves James very much. Henry will not explain explicitly what he thinks his brother’s aims are, only saying that he... (full context)
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
Loyalty and Love Theme Icon
...express more affection towards Catherine than she does towards James, but Catherine thinks of what Henry Tilney said, and decides that perhaps this is just how James and Isabella’s relationship operates. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 5
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...she heads to Northanger Abbey, Catherine at first feels very uncomfortable among the Tilneys. Although Henry and Eleanor are kind to her, Catherine feels that the General’s constant concern for her... (full context)
Wealth and Respectability Theme Icon
Experience and Innocence Theme Icon
...Tilney suggests that Catherine should ride the rest of the way to Northanger Abbey with Henry in his open carriage. She thinks of what Mr. Allen said about young people riding... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
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Henry tells Catherine that he is very glad she is coming to spend time with his... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
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Smiling, Henry asks if Catherine has a very high opinion of the abbey. She says she does,... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 6
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
...and sees that it is modern and comfortable, not at all resembling the one that Henry described. She hurries to get ready, so as not to displease the General by being... (full context)
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
...she notices a cabinet. Although the cabinet is black and yellow, not black and gold, Henry’s description rushes back to her and she hurries to examine the cabinet. She struggles to... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 7
Novels and the Heroine Theme Icon
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
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...the furnishings are in the room. She thinks that she would be very embarrassed if Henry Tilney were to find out how carried away she has been. Catherine goes into the... (full context)
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...that Eleanor taught her to admire them. She says she never cared about flowers before. Henry says a taste for flowers is good for women because it tempts them to spend... (full context)
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Henry prepares to leave for Woodston and they all gather to see him off. Catherine asks... (full context)
Sincerity and Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...ready for a walk with Catherine and Eleanor. Catherine is disappointed. She thinks that without Henry there to explain the landscape, she will not know what is picturesque. She tells Eleanor... (full context)
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...and says that she misses her mother terribly, especially because she has no sister. Although Henry visits often, she is often alone. Catherine remarks that Eleanor must miss Henry very much,... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 9
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...without Eleanor there to see what she is doing. Wanting to make this exploration before Henry returns the next day, she decides to go immediately. Entering, she sees a cheerful and... (full context)
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...to return to her room when she hears footsteps coming and is surprised to see Henry ascend the stairs. They are astonished to find each other there. Catherine, very embarrassed, says... (full context)
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Catherine begins to say that it is late and she must dress for dinner, but Henry counters that it isn’t late. For the first time, Catherine wishes to be away from... (full context)
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Catherine looks more directly into Henry’s eyes than she ever has before. Henry explains that his mother’s illness was sudden, although... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 10
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...night, Catherine feels completely disillusioned. She knows that she has embarrassed herself in front of Henry. She thinks he must despise her for her absurd curiosity and the terrible crime she... (full context)
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...in Italy and France, but that in England people are neither villains nor angels. Even Henry and Eleanor, she reflects, may have imperfections, and certainly the General, even if he is... (full context)
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Catherine gasps in astonishment while reading, and both Henry and Eleanor are concerned about what kind of news she has received. She cries over... (full context)
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Catherine joins Henry and Eleanor, then sits in silence, unsure what to say. Eleanor asks if her family... (full context)
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Catherine lets both brother and sister read James’s letter. Henry is very surprised, but says that, if it is true, he will not envy Frederick’s... (full context)
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Henry sarcastically says that Eleanor should prepare for a sister-in-law who is “open, candid, artless, guileless,... (full context)
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Catherine says that perhaps Isabella will be loyal to Frederick. Henry says she will certainly be loyal unless she meets a baronet. Catherine concedes that Isabella... (full context)
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...by anyone in her life. She worries about how James will recover from this loss. Henry asks her if she herself feels that she has lost a very dear friend and... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 11
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Catherine, Henry, and Eleanor speak frequently about the possibility that Frederick and Isabella will marry. Henry and... (full context)
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Catherine thinks that Henry ought to warn his father about what has occurred between her brother and Isabella so... (full context)
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...concerned that Catherine should enjoy herself and decides that they should bring her to visit Henry at his parsonage in Woodston. He says he is sure Catherine will not mind if... (full context)
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Catherine is disappointed to have Henry leave early and feels out of sorts. She is sure that Captain Tilney’s letter will... (full context)
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...too captivated to pay attention to him. Forgetting her restraint, Catherine proclaims a room in Henry’s home “the prettiest room she ever saw” and earnestly asks why it is not yet... (full context)
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...ever seen. She notices that the General makes no remark on how fancy a meal Henry has prepared. By the end of their visit, Catherine feels sure that the General wishes... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 12
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Catherine reads the letter aloud to Henry and Eleanor and denounces Isabella, saying she wishes she had never known her. She congratulates... (full context)
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Catherine thinks it is right of Henry to stand up for Frederick, and Henry says that if she were to truly stand... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 13
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...is spent happily. Catherine feels unconstrained in his absence, and has a wonderful time with Henry and Eleanor, but wonders if she might be overstaying her welcome. She wonders if the... (full context)
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Henry is obliged to leave Northanger for a couple of nights, but with the General’s absence,... (full context)
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...incivility is hard to believe. She will not even be able to say goodbye to Henry. She thinks that, despite what Eleanor said, she must have somehow offended the General. Catherine... (full context)
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...eat so that Eleanor will not feel so bad, but compares yesterday’s breakfast spent with Henry to the sad breakfast today, and can hardly swallow a bite. Eleanor begs Catherine to... (full context)
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...asks that Eleanor say goodbye to “her absent friend.” She cannot bring herself to speak Henry’s name, but runs from the hall and jumps into the carriage, which immediately rides off. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 14
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...Woodston. She remembers how the General had seemed so much to want her engagement to Henry and wonders what she could have done. She is sure Henry did not tell his... (full context)
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...but to be honest, while also writing a letter she would not be embarrassed for Henry to read. In the end, she decides to write a very brief note, expressing gratitude... (full context)
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...meet again in a few years. This is not comforting to Catherine, who thinks that Henry Tilney will likely forget her in a few years, although she will never forget him. (full context)
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...met the Thorpes when they had no acquaintances. Mrs. Allen also talks about how agreeable Mr. Tilney was, to which Catherine cannot reply. (full context)
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...Catherine’s feelings. Catherine feels her entire happiness rests with the Tilneys. She silently thinks that Henry must by this time have heard about what happened to her. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 15
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...Morland returns to the room, she is surprised to find a strange young man there. Henry Tilney rises to meet her, saying that he had come to make sure Catherine had... (full context)
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Eventually Mrs. Morland runs out of small talk and everyone falls silent. Mr. Tilney , for the first time addressing Catherine, asks if the Allens are home and, blushing,... (full context)
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Henry wants to explain his father’s conduct, but is more eager to explain his own feelings.... (full context)
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...a very brief visit at the Allens. On their walk back to the Morlands’ home, Henry explains that his father had told him two days before that she had been sent... (full context)
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Henry explains that the General had mistakenly believed Catherine to be very rich, and had therefore... (full context)
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Henry did not explain all of this to Catherine at that moment, but he told her... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 16
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...as soon as the General should give his. They do not demand the General’s money. Henry Tilney is sure of a fortune regardless of the General’s consent, and it is clear... (full context)
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...remaining pages that it will soon end, the Narrator remarks, and so they cannot share Henry and Catherine’s anxiety. But how could the General be brought around? It was Eleanor’s marriage... (full context)
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Eleanor and her husband, a Viscount, help persuade the General to accept Henry’s marriage to Catherine. It also helps that Catherine is not nearly as poor as John... (full context)