Out of This Furnace

Out of This Furnace

Joe is a Greek-Catholic Slovak and George Kracha’s best friend. He is also Dorta’s first husband and Andrei Sedlar’s brother-in-law. Kracha meets Dubik in White Haven, Pennsylvania, and Dubik helps Kracha settle in America. The two men become quick friends and roommates, and, for years, Dubik is the only person to whom Kracha reveals the truth about losing all of his travel money trying to woo Zuska. Dubik and Dorta move to Braddock before the Krachas, and Dubik begins working in the steel mill. When Kracha moves to Braddock, Dubik helps his friend secure a job in the mill. Dubik serves as a moderating influence over Kracha, advising him about work and suggesting that he be more sympathetic to Elena. Dubik’s importance in Kracha’s life makes him a tragic character, as a furnace explosion burns Dubik alive not long after Kracha settles in Braddock. He is the first significant character in the novel killed in the steel mill, and Kracha’s efforts to save his friend’s life by carrying him from the accident scene and bringing him to his home reveal Dubik’s ability to bring out the best in Kracha, who otherwise frequently succumbs to his own selfish impulses.

Joe Dubik Quotes in Out of This Furnace

The Out of This Furnace quotes below are all either spoken by Joe Dubik or refer to Joe Dubik. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the University of Pittsburgh Press edition of Out of This Furnace published in 1941.
Part 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

She had to work hard, cooking, washing, scrubbing; and what pleasure did she ever get? Women had a hard time of it, Dubik said. Put yourself in her place. How would you like to live her life, eh?

Page Number: 22
Explanation and Analysis:
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Part 1, Chapter 7 Quotes

I work, eat, sleep, work, eat, sleep, until there are times when I couldn't tell you my own name. And every other Sunday the long turn, twenty-four hours straight in the mill. Jezis!, what a life!

Related Characters: Joe Dubik (speaker), Djuro “George” Kracha, Joe Dubik, Andrej Sedlar
Related Symbols: Steel Mills
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:
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Part 1, Chapter 9 Quotes

These were the same people who snorted disrespectfully when they were reminded that in books and speeches Carnegie had uttered some impressive sounds about democracy and workers' rights.

Related Symbols: Steel Mills, Unions
Page Number: 39
Explanation and Analysis:
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Joe Dubik Character Timeline in Out of This Furnace

The timeline below shows where the character Joe Dubik appears in Out of This Furnace. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 2
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
The American Dream vs. Reality Theme Icon
...language is “understandably Slovak,” but with a noticeable Rusnak accent. The man’s name is Joe Dubik. He is a Greek-Catholic Slovak who tells Kracha that Kracha’s brother-in-law, Andrej Sedlar, is the... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 3
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
...of his money. Later, during an early springtime walk on the railroad tracks, Kracha tells Dubik the truth about how he blew his travel money on Zuska, a truth Dubik vows... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 4
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
Women’s Work Theme Icon
...is now listless and largely uninterested in his desires, but soon she becomes pregnant. Meanwhile, Dubik sends for his sweetheart, Dorta, to come to Pennsylvania from Slovakia. She arrives at Thanksgiving... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 5
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
The American Dream vs. Reality Theme Icon
...Plymouth, where their third daughter, Anna, is born. While Kracha continues toiling on the railroad, Dubik tires of the work, and decides to move with Dorta to Braddock to work in... (full context)
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
Women’s Work Theme Icon
Capital vs. Labor Theme Icon
Kracha misses his friend, and Dubik’s absence saddens Elena, as he frequently urged Kracha (to little avail) to sympathize with her... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 7
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
Kracha wishes to see his friend Dubik, but the Braddock mills run constantly. After receiving his first paycheck, he and Andrej travel... (full context)
Immigration and American Identity Theme Icon
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
The American Dream vs. Reality Theme Icon
...discuss the pros and cons of keeping boarders and the difficulty of finding a house. Dubik entertains the idea of settling on a small farm, but Kracha says he got his... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 8
Women’s Work Theme Icon
Mike Dobrejcak, the son of the carpenter in Dubik’s native village, writes that he is moving to Braddock, and asks Dubik to find him... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 9
Capital vs. Labor Theme Icon
Fed up with the chaos in Homestead, Kracha asks Dubik to secure him a job in the Braddock steel mill. The Krachas move to Braddock,... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 11
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
Capital vs. Labor Theme Icon
Dubik and Kracha walk to the steel mill on a steaming August day. Dubik tells Kracha... (full context)
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
Capital vs. Labor Theme Icon
Dubik tries to speak, but his scorched face cracks. He tells Kracha not to take him... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 12
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
The American Dream vs. Reality Theme Icon
Dubik’s horrific death weighs heavily on Kracha. A few weeks after the accident, he, Dorta, and... (full context)
Part 1, Kracha: Chapter 22
Women’s Work Theme Icon
...purchased Kracha’s old shop. Dorta also reminds Kracha that it is the third anniversary of Dubik’s death. Kracha says he would be “better off if [Dubik] had lived,” but Dorta does... (full context)
Part 4, Dobie: Chapter 16
Industrialization and Destruction Theme Icon
Capital vs. Labor Theme Icon
...gave their lives to the steel mills, people like Mike Dobrejcak, Mary Dobrejcak, Pauline, Joe Dubik, and Kracha, as well as “all the thousands of lives the mills had consumed as... (full context)