Playing Beatie Bow

by

Ruth Park

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Playing Beatie Bow can help.
The protagonist of the novel, fourteen-year-old Abigail Kirk is a quiet and reserved girl who does not believe in love, and who shares little of herself with the world around her, always keeping herself guarded even with those she cares about. Abigail lives a relatively normal teenage existence—her parents are separated, as her father Weyland left Abigail and her mother Kathy for a younger woman some years ago, but before he left he installed Abigail and Kathy in a fine apartment in a high-rise tower. Abigail frequently babysits for her next-door neighbors, Vincent and Natalie Crown, and it is on a visit to the playground with the two of them that she first encounters a mysterious little girl with “furry” hair. Abigail, an accomplished seamstress, sews herself a green dress with a crochet yoke taken from a scrap bag at the Crowns’, and one afternoon—wearing her new dress out—decides to follow the mysterious furry girl through the streets of Sydney. Abigail does not realize that she is following the girl through time, though, and a disoriented Abigail finds herself lost in 1873, in the grimy, working-class Rocks district. As Abigail adjusts to her strange new circumstances, she is taken in by the Bow-Tallisker family, who believe Abigail when she cagily tells them that she is an amnesiac who cannot remember where she comes from. Adjusting to life in the 1800s is hard enough, but Abigail’s particular journey is complicated even further when she realizes that the Bows see her as the mysterious Stranger—an individual who, according to a prophecy seen by the foresighted Granny, who has the Gift of clairvoyance, will save the families and help ensure the Gift is carried on to the next generation. Abigail struggles against her seemingly cosmic duty, wanting only to return to her own time—but the longer she spends with the Bows and the Talliskers, the more they start to feel like family, and the deeper her feelings of love, respect, gratitude, and duty towards them grow. By the end of her journey, Abigail has done quite a lot of growing up—she has learned about the transformative power of love, the importance of familial duty, and the fickle but profound nature of time, history, and legacy.

Abigail Kirk Quotes in Playing Beatie Bow

The Playing Beatie Bow quotes below are all either spoken by Abigail Kirk or refer to Abigail Kirk. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Puffin Books edition of Playing Beatie Bow published in 1980.
Chapter 1  Quotes

Outside, [Abigail] was composed, independent, not very much liked. The girls at school said she was a weirdie, and there was no doubt she was an outsider. She looked like a stick in jeans and a tank top; so she would not wear them. If everyone else was wearing her hair over her face, Abigail scraped hers back. She didn’t have a boy friend, and when asked why she either looked enigmatic as though she knew twenty times more about boys than anyone else, or said she’d never met one who was half-way as interesting as her maths textbook. The girls said she was unreal, and she shrugged coolly. The really unreal thing was that she didn’t care in the least what they thought of her. She felt a hundred years older and wiser than this love-mad rabble in her class.

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:

[Abigail’s] chief concern was that no one, not even her mother, should know what she was like inside. Because maybe to adults the turmoil of uncertainties, extravagant glooms, and sudden blisses, might present some kind of pattern or map, so that they could say, ‘Ah, so that’s the real Abigail, is it?’ The thought of such trespass made her stomach turn over. So she cultivated an expressionless face, a long piercing glance under her eyelashes that Grandmother called slippery. She carefully laid false trails until she herself sometimes could not find the way into her secret heart. Yet the older she grew the more she longed for someone to laugh at the false trails with, to share the secrets. What secrets? She didn’t yet know what they were herself.

Page Number: 4-5
Explanation and Analysis:

The May holidays always made [Abigail] feel forlorn and restless. […] if her mother didn’t want her to help at the shop, she spent hours squashed into the corner of the brown armchair, which had once been a kindly bear and now was only a bear-shaped chair near a window which looked out on cranes and mast tops, on the deck of the Harbour Bridge and the pearly cusps of the Opera House rising through the gauzy murk like Aladdin’s palace. Mumping, her mother called it. But she was not doing that, or even thinking. Mostly she was just aware of something missing. When she was young she thought it was her father, for she had missed him miserably as well as hating him. […] But now she wasn’t a kid she knew that it wasn’t the absence of her father that caused the empty place inside. It was a part of her and she didn’t know what it was or why it was there.

Page Number: 5-6
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

“Oh, I know all you schoolgirls think you know every last word in the book about the relationships between a man and a woman; but love is a thing you have to experience before you know—” she hesitated, and then blurted out—“how powerful it can be.”

Related Characters: Katherine “Kathy” Kirk (speaker), Abigail Kirk, Weyland Kirk
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

Her eyes turned instinctively to the corner of the wall where it met the street. There lurked Natalie's little furry girl, looking cold and forlorn.

“She looks the way I feel,” thought Abigail. But how did she feel? Not quite lost but almost. Baffled. A sense of too many strange ideas crowding around her, a feeling of helplessness and difficulty with which she could not come to terms. She thought, “Maybe they're right. Maybe there is such a thing as being too young and inexperienced to know your own mind.”

Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

“What’s your name?”

“Beatie Bow.”

Abigail scowled. “Quit having me on, whoever you are. That’s the name of a kids’ game.”

“I ken that well enough. But it’s my name. Beatrice May Bow, and I’m eleven years of age, though small for it, I know, because of the fever.” Suddenly she grabbed Abigail’s arm. “Dunna tell, I’m asking you. Dunna tell Granny where you come from, or I’m for it. She’ll say I’ve the Gift and I havena, and don’t want it, God knows, because I’m afeared of what it does.”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Beatie Bow / “The little furry girl” (speaker), Granny Tallisker
Page Number: 38-39
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

“Do you have a good or a bad feeling about him, poor bairn?”

Granny sighed. “I hae no clear feelings any more, Dovey. They're as mixed up as folk in fog.”

“But you've no doubt that this little one here is the Stranger?”

The two women spoke in whispers, but Abigail heard them, for the night was almost silent. There was no sound of traffic except a dray's wheels rolling like distant thunder over the cobbles at the docks. She could hear the waves breaking on the rocks of Dawes Point and Walsh Bay.

“Aye, when I first saw her I had a flash, clear as it was when I was a lass. Poor ill-favoured little yellow herring of a thing. But still, it came to me then, she was the Stranger that would save the Gift for the family.”

Abigail was so indignant at the description of herself that she almost opened her eyes.

“And then there was the gown, forebye. I swear, Granny, I almost fainted when I set eyes on it. The very pattern that we worked out between us!”

“And not a needle lifted to it yet,” said Granny.

Related Characters: Granny Tallisker (speaker), Dorcas “Dovey” Tallisker (speaker), Abigail Kirk, Gibbie Bow
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 50
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

The first thing was their kindness. How amazingly widespread it was. […] They had taken responsibility for her, nursed and clothed her. Someone had given up her bed, probably Beatie; no one had complained when she was snappish and rude about Dovey's best clothes, about the lack of sanitation; no one had condemned her unsympathetic attitude towards Gibbie.

“I'm not kind,” said Abigail with a sickish surprise. “Look how I went on with Mum when she said she wanted us to get together with Dad again. Look what I did to Dad when I was little, punched him on the nose and made it bleed. Maybe I’ve never been really kind in my life.” […] These Victorians lived in a dangerous world, where a whole family could be wiped out with typhoid fever or smallpox, where a soldier could get a hole in his head that you could put your fist in, where there were no pensions or free hospitals or penicillin or proper education for girls, or even poor boys, probably. Yet, in a way, it was a more human world than the one Abigail called her own.

“I wish I could stay awhile,” she thought, “and find out why all these things are. But I can't think about any of this till I get home. Getting home, that’s what I have to plan.”

Page Number: 75-77
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

“I've nothing to do with it!” cried Abigail. “I came here without wanting to and I want to go home. I've a life of my own, and I want to live it. My mother, I miss her, don't you understand?” she said chokily. She thought fiercely, “I won't cry, I won't.” She waited for a moment, and then said quietly, “I'm not your mysterious Stranger. I'm just someone who came into your life here in some way that's a riddle to me. But I have to go home, I don’t belong here. You must see that.”

“We canna let you go,” said Mrs. Tallisker. She had relinquished Abigail's hand and was sitting up against her pillows. Except for her sunken eyes she looked almost like her own dignified strong self again.

[…]

“But we canna let you go until you have done whatever it is the Stranger must do to preserve the Gift.” Dovey was distressed. “Oh, dear Abby, it may only be for a little while and then we will help you go to your own place. We do understand what you feel, that you long for your ain folk, but we canna let you go . . . you are our only hope, you see.”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Granny Tallisker (speaker), Dorcas “Dovey” Tallisker (speaker)
Page Number: 107-108
Explanation and Analysis:

In a way she felt as she had felt when her father went away and left her. Fright, anger and helplessness, the sense of being nobody who could make things happen. But then she had been only ten. Four years of schooling her face to be expressionless, her thoughts to be her private property, had not gone to waste.

After her first despair, she thought, “I won’t let them beat me. If that dress is hidden around the house I’lI find it. Or I'll bribe Beatie, or coax Judah, into telling me where it is.”

She had learnt a lot about herself in this new rough world. Her own thoughts and conclusions of just a month before filled her with embarrassed astonishment when she reviewed them.

“What a dummo I was! I knew as much about real life as poor little Natty.”

Page Number: 115
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

“I just want to go home, you know,” whispered Abigail.

“You're as restless as a robin, child,” said Mrs Tallisker. 'But 'twill not be long now.”

There was a great difference in Mrs. Tallisker. She had, all at once, become older and smaller. Only a few weeks before she had towered, or so it seemed, over Abigail. Now Abigail was almost as tall. Her skin had crumpled more deeply, more extensively, like a slowly withering flower. She could not work as hard as before, but sat more often in the parlour with Gibbie, knitting thick grey socks for Judah.

“Aye,” she said with her sweet smile, as Abigail secretly stared at her, "tis a fearful effort to give out the Power when it has decided to leave. If I could do what I did for you, child, you can give me a little of your time, inna that fair enough?”

“Yes, of course,” said Abigail, but in her heart she was grudging.

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Granny Tallisker (speaker), Judah Bow, Gibbie Bow
Page Number: 119
Explanation and Analysis:

“’Tis here I live, do you see, in 1873, and my labour is here, and my own folk, and I'm thankful to God for both. So that's enough for me.”

“But men landing on the moon!” cried Abigail. “Don’t you think that's fantastic?”

“Damned foolishness, I call it,” [Judah] said, and flushed. “Your pardon, Abby, for a word Granny would thicken my ear for, but 'tis no more and no less. What good to man or beast is that bare lump of rock?”

“At least it makes the tides,” snapped Abigail, “and where would you be without them?”

He laughed. “True for you, but no man has to go there to press a lever or turn a wheel for that!”

Having failed to interest him in the future, she turned to the past, and asked him was he ever homesick for Orkney, as she knew Dovey was.

“Not I,” he said. “Why, 'tis the past, and dead and gone. I'm a New South Welshman now, and glad about it, aye, gey glad!” His eyes danced. “Ah, I'm glad to be alive, and at this minute, I tell ye!”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Judah Bow (speaker), Granny Tallisker
Page Number: 121
Explanation and Analysis:

For an instant she remembered her mother's dark dewdrop eyes, as she said, “You don't know how powerful love can be,” and she thought how strange it was that love had made her both callous and tender. She did not care if this child died. Though she had never liked him, she had not wanted to deprive him of his life. But now, if his death meant that Judah lived, then she did not care a jot if he died. At the same time she did what would have made her skin creep a day or so before: she put her arms around his shivering, bony little body and held him comfortingly.

Page Number: 125
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

“Stay awhile with us,” begged Dovey the next day, “for you're one of the family, Abby, true!”

“No,” said Abigail. “I have to go home; you know that.”

Her green dress looked strange to her; it had been so long since she had seen it. She saw it was not very well made; it was not worthy of the lace-like crochet. Abigail put on the dress. It fitted more tightly across the chest. My figure’s coming at last, she thought. Inside she was cold and without feeling, like a volcano covered with ice.

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Dorcas “Dovey” Tallisker (speaker)
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 160
Explanation and Analysis:

Abigail saw ahead of her the lamp that lit the steep stairs to the alley which ran down to the playground. Beatie kicked angrily at the kerbstone. Her face was undecided, back to its crabbed urchin look.

“I know you hate me because I fell in love with your brother. Well, he doesn't love me, never did and never will. And I did save Dovey for him.”

“’Twas no more than what you were sent for,” said Beatie churlishly.

Abigail lost her temper. “Oh, you know everything, don't you? Let me tell you, you sulky little pig, you know nothing about love, that's one thing. You have to experience it to know how powerful it is.”

Here she stopped, dumbstruck, remembering who had said the same words to her.

Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:

In a flash the study vanished and Abigail was on a ship. The waves ran along the side, leaping and hissing. They were as grey as marble. The ship rolled and creaked. There was a drumming from up in the air, where the wet sails flickered out showers of salty drops. But she felt no movement. Muffled in his pea-jacket, a woolen cap on his bright head, Judah sat on a roll of canvas, mending some ship's gear, or so she thought. He had not got older as Beatie had.

“Judah!” she cried joyfully, but he did not look up. The pulley and rope in his fingers changed to a knife and a little wooden figure he was whittling. Somehow she knew it was herself. With an exclamation she could not hear, he tossed it overboard, where it turned into Abby herself, clad in Dovey's blouse and serge skirt, rising stiffly up and down in the waves like a statue or a ship's figurehead.

“Oh, Judah,” sobbed Abigail, “how could you?”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Judah Bow
Page Number: 170
Explanation and Analysis:

It was amazing, terrifying, that all signs of the family's life could have so completely vanished, as if they had never been. It was as if time were a vast black hole which swallowed up all trace of human woes and joys and small hopes and tendernesses. And the same thing would happen to her and her parents.

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker)
Page Number: 173
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

“Now then, start from the very beginning and tell me about everything. Did you go to Oslo University? Did you have any romances with glamorous Norwegians?”

“Oh, three or four.” Abigail smiled. “They're irresistible people. Not serious though.”

“You'll die being back in this old mundane place,” said Justine.

“No, not at all. Oh, it seems a bit hot and bright after those northern countries, but I'm going to finish my degree at Sydney University. I'll soon get used to it, and everything that happened in the last four years will seem like a fairy-tale.”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Justine Crown (speaker)
Page Number: 186
Explanation and Analysis:

The Bible was a mighty volume. The green plush had hardly any pile left at all; the brass edges were black and bent. They had not been polished for many years.

“Justine had it at the top of the linen cupboard. It belonged to some old great-great aunt or such. She used to be headmistress at Fort Street School, you know the old building up near the Observatory that the National Trust has now?”

“So she made it, the little stirrer!” crowed Abigail. She beamed at Robert, who gaped at her.

'She wasn't any little stirrer; she was a perfect old tartar. Mother remembered her quite well; she was in an old ladies' home or something. Mother was petrified with terror of her, she said.”

“Old Miss Bow!” Abigail laughed marvelling. “Who would have guessed it? I guess that's how that kids’ game sprang up . . . terror lest Miss Beatie Bow would rise from the grave and give them all what for.”

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Robert Bow (speaker), Beatie Bow / “The little furry girl”
Page Number: 191
Explanation and Analysis:

“Natalie has something to do with this, hasn't she,” he pondered. “Because, after all, she's a Bow, and perhaps she has the Gift. And the crochet, because it came from the fingers of that Great-great-great-grandmother Alice from the Orkneys, was just enough to tip you over into the last century. She was right, you know: you were the Stranger of the Prophecy.”

Related Characters: Robert Bow (speaker), Abigail Kirk, Granny Tallisker, Natalie Crown
Page Number: 193
Explanation and Analysis:

“You would have liked Granny Tallisker,” said Abigail. She sighed. “You won't care for mine, she's even worse than she used to be.”

She was silent, thinking of that old woman, Alice Tallisker, her infinite goodness and strength, and how she had said that the link between Abigail and the Talliskers and Bows was no stronger than the link between that family and Abigail. The theory she had had when wandering The Rocks four years before - that time was a great black vortex down which everything disappeared - no longer made sense to her. She saw now that it was a great river, always moving, always changing, but with the same water flowing between its banks from source to sea.

Related Characters: Abigail Kirk (speaker), Granny Tallisker
Page Number: 195
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Playing Beatie Bow LitChart as a printable PDF.
Playing Beatie Bow PDF

Abigail Kirk Character Timeline in Playing Beatie Bow

The timeline below shows where the character Abigail Kirk appears in Playing Beatie Bow. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1 
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Fourteen-year-old Abigail Kirk was originally, as an infant, christened Lynette, a name which her mother Katherine regrets... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
...had become “a little witch,” the girl decided she wanted a witch’s name, and selected Abigail as her new name, despite her mother’s protestations. Abigail took the name and vowed that... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail, now fourteen, is a thin, plain girl who is studious and clever but reserved and... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The May holidays arrive—they always make Abigail feel “forlorn and restless,” and rather than helping her mother at her antiques shop she... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail has a close friendship with her mother. Back when their family all lived together in... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail, bored and lonely, gets up from her brown armchair and goes to visit the Crowns,... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail steels herself against the monstrous Vincent’s nagging and offers Justine to take the two to... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...to play with the other children gathered there, most of whom also live in Mitchell. Abigail observes the children “racing dementedly back and forth,” clearly playing some kind of group game.... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail and Natalie watch the game—a girl stands in the middle of a circle of children,... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...playing Beatie Bow catches someone, that person then becomes the next Beatie Bow. Natalie tells Abigail that the game does actually frighten many of the children who play it, since so... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Vincent approaches Abigail and asks if he can play once more—Abigail tells him that it is time to... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Inside the apartment, Abigail offers to stay until dinner so that she can entertain Natalie while Justine cooks and... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail and Natalie pick through a bag of fabric, testing swatches against Natalie’s teddy. Abigail tells... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail says goodbye to the Crowns and heads home, where she carefully washes and dries the... (full context)
Chapter 2
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
At breakfast, Kathy admires Abigail’s new dress, and chatters on and on happily. When Abigail asks her mother what she’s... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail asks her mother if she had just run into Weyland, but Kathy confesses that she... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail is shocked and disappointed to realize that her mother is considering Weyland’s proposal in earnest,... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
This is too much for Abigail—she is seized by jealousy and anger, and tells her mother that even though Kathy might... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Kathy taps on Abigail’s bedroom door and attempts to get her to come back out, but Abigail ignores her... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Later that afternoon, Abigail heads over to the Crowns’. She tells Justine she is bored, and offers to take... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
On the way down to the playground, Natalie tells Abigail that she was able to see the little furry girl on the playground from all... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Natalie suggests they go speak to the little girl. As they approach her, Abigail notices that she is probably eleven, but small for her age—she is barefoot, and the... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail returns to her own apartment, where she argues some more with her mother about Weyland’s... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
In the morning, there is a stony coldness between Kathy and Abigail, but Abigail nonetheless agrees to help out at the shop for the weekend. As the... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
When Abigail gets off the bus, she passes the playground. Darkness is falling, and many children are... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail follows the little girl down an unfamiliar alleyway, calling after her, promising that all she... (full context)
Chapter 3
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Though the little furry girl tries to lose Abigail as she winds through the streets and alleyways, Abigail pursues her—sometimes, when the little girl... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail finally catches up with the furry girl, but stops when she encounters a beggar with... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail pursues the furry girl to the doorway of a corner shop, and a familiar smell... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail awakens, but keeps her eyes shut, sensing that she is somewhere strange and foreign. She... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
As hands move over her head, Abigail stays still and keeps her eyes shut. She feels confused and sick, and has a... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
The sweet-faced girl offers Abigail a sip of posset—a drink made of hot milk curdled with alcohol—promising that it will... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail asks if a man with a sword really knocked her over in the street, and... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail asks where they are, and Beatie tells her that she is in the best room... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Beatie tells Abigail that she knows she shouldn’t have gone to watch the children’s game, but couldn’t help... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Judah offers Abigail a candy, and she sits up and accepts it. She looks around the room, and... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail asks to be helped over to the window, so that she can see where she... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Dovey tucks Abigail back in, lamenting the fact that the poor girl seems to have lost her memory.... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Judah and Granny go downstairs, and Dovey comes back over to Abigail to place a hand on her forehead. She assures her that she has no fever,... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
As Abigail listens to Beatie speak, she realizes that Natalie’s belief that the little furry girl was... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Beatie asks Abigail how the playing children all knew her name, but Abigail insists she doesn’t know. Beatie... (full context)
Chapter 4
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail is awoken twice during the night by the sounds of a child “whimpering forlornly” above... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...up. Dovey asks Granny if she has begun to doubt whether “this little one here”—meaning Abigail—is in truth “the Stranger.” (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Granny tells Dovey that she is certain about Abigail—she is the Stranger who will save the Gift for the family. Dovey agrees—she knew by... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail is pulled under into sleep, and is afraid that the two women have poisoned or... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail sits up. Her head feels better, but her ankle still pains her. She looks at... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Dovey comes into the room with fresh warm water for Abigail to wash up with. Dovey asks Abigail if she is able to remember anything about... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Granny comes into the room to check on Abigail, and when Abigail asks if she can get up and walk about the house, Granny... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Granny tells Abigail that all there is to read is the family Bible, but Abigail shakes her head.... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail lies in bed and listens to the sounds of the nineteenth-century Rocks district outside her... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Dovey is brushing Abigail’s hair when the two of them hear footsteps coming up the stairs. Dovey tells Abigail... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Uncle Samuel enters the room and apologizes to Abigail, insisting that sometimes he believes he is off fighting the Russians again, and goes into... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Dovey tells Beatie that Granny wants her to read the Bible to Abigail, and suggests she read her a nice passage before leaving the room with Uncle Samuel.... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Beatie tells Abigail she does not want to go against Granny, since Granny thinks Abigail is the Stranger,... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Beatie asks if people still die of fever and smallpox in the future, and when Abigail tells her they do not, Beatie cries, lamenting that her mother and the baby she... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Over the course of the next two days, Abigail learns a lot about the Bows and the Talliskers from Beatie herself. Dovey Tallisker is... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail asks Beatie to tell her next about the mysterious Gift, but Beatie says it’s a... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
On the third day, Abigail is allowed to get dressed and have Mr. Bow carry her downstairs. The clothing Abigail... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
As Mr. Bow carries Abigail downstairs, she thinks he looks strange, and wonders if another “spell” is coming on. Abigail... (full context)
Chapter 5
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
As Gibbie and Abigail sit by the fire, Gibbie tells Abigail that he is not long for the world—his... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail is well aware of the morbidity and fascination with death typical of the Victorian era... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Gibbie begins speaking aloud about the extravagant plans he has for his own funeral. Abigail warns Gibbie not to fixate on death, because if he actually died, he’d be leaving... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Gibbie does not want to play dominoes, so to pass the time, Abigail opens the window curtains and looks out on the dingy but bustling street. She is... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...to help clean up in the shop, as Mr. Bow has made a mess there. Abigail looks out into the street and realizes that she knows exactly where in the Rocks... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
...Bow inside and help him to a bench. The shop is still a mess, and Abigail offers to help get things in order. Mr. Bow sits in the corner as if... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...women salvage what they can of the ruined treats throughout the shop, and Dovey shows Abigail the many different kinds of candy Mr. Bow makes. Gibbie laments that no one will... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Granny helps Abigail back into bed and applies a healing poultice to her ankle. Over the course of... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail is amazed by the kindness not just of the family that has taken her in,... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
...the Victorian world is dangerous, rife with disease, war, and subpar education and social security, Abigail concedes that it is in many ways “a more human world” than Abigail’s own. Against... (full context)
Chapter 6
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The day Abigail runs away to go home begins like any other. She is dressed in Dovey’s plain... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
On the day Abigail tries to run away, her ankle has gone down to its normal size, and she... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail has had to field endless questions from Beatie about the future, however, but Beatie does... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
After Beatie has gone off to school and Granny and Dovey leave Abigail alone in the shop with the absent-minded Mr. Bow, Abigail seizes her chance and leaves... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
As Abigail passes the school where Beatie attends classes, she stoops low, hoping the child will not... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail looks down and sees a frightful, legless man with a bulging forehead grinning toothlessly up... (full context)
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
The sack is pulled off Abigail’s head—she is in a dark room that smells horrible, and in front of her is... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The people around her openly discuss buying, selling, sampling, and “nibbling” Abigail. The man with the husky voice, Barker, asks Abigail if she’ll be quiet if he... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail feels something moving beneath her on the ground, and realizes that she has fallen on... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
A pretty woman approaches Abigail and introduces herself as Emily, but tells Abigail that she goes by Maude, as the... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail looks around the room and immediately tries to think of ways she might get herself... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
...Doll was sent to live with her aunt Hannah in the colonies, and she tells Abigail that Hannah did her the favor of putting her to work so that she wouldn’t... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Doll is in a stupor or a trance as she tells her story, and Abigail takes the opportunity to get to her feet and go to the window, slowly working... (full context)
Chapter 7
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail, frightened, is about to duck out of the window and shut it when she hears... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail, Judah, and his shipmates scurry across the roofs of nearby buildings, and the boys are... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Judah takes Abigail upstairs and lays her down on her own bed. He asks Dovey how Granny is... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Dovey gets Abigail ready for bed and leaves her alone, but Beatie enters the room and sits at... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
In the morning, Abigail awakes to find Dovey kneeling at her bedside, praying that Abigail is still as “innocent... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail begs Dovey to confirm that she is the Stranger. When Dovey does, Abigail implores Dovey... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...when she was sick, and had a dream of a yellow fever rag on the door—Abigail startles to remember she, too, had that very same dream. Beatie confesses that she had... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...upstairs—it’s Gibbie, calling for the chamber-pot. Beatie offers to take it to Gibbie so that Abigail can go and see Granny. Dovey takes Abigail up to Granny’s room. The old woman... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Granny tells Abigail—and Dovey—that now is the time for truth. She asks Abigail if she indeed comes from... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail expresses her distaste for Granny’s talking about her family as if they are only pawns... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail attempts once again to convince the Tallisker women that she is not the Stranger—she was... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail, angry, leaves the room and goes downstairs. Dovey follows her down, and attempts to embrace... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail returns to Granny’s room and demands that Granny verify Dovey’s claim. Granny tells Abigail that... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail asks Granny why, if she herself has the Gift, she cannot see what is to... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Gibbie calls out for help again, and this time Abigail volunteers to go see to him. As she mounts the stairs to the attic, she... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail asks Gibbie if he has ever heard the story of Treasure Island, and volunteers to... (full context)
Chapter 8
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail feels slightly like she did when her father first left her and her mother. She... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail decides to not grow silent and distraught, and asks Granny how she can help around... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail inserts herself into the household routine, scrubbing and dusting the house and raking the shop... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail often works in the shop, and finds that Mr. Bow, despite his spells, is a... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail asks Mr. Bow about his time in the Crimean War, but he tells her he... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail has noticed a change in Granny—she has become older and smaller in the weeks since... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail begins noticing how Judah, a seaman who is often away, blusters in and out of... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...lively. Judah dreams of having his own ship one day, and shares his hopes with Abigail. During one of these conversations, as the two of them joke back and forth, Abigail... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Dovey is in bed and asleep when Abigail gets to the room—she undresses quickly and gets into her own bed, burying her face... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
When Abigail arrives in Gibbie’s room, he whines that he wants Dovey—he is scared of the lightning... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail asks Gibbie if he wants to hear more Treasure Island, but Gibbie is asleep in... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...more often. Though Dovey worries that a season of so much rain will bring sickness, Abigail is “filled with richness”—the enchanting calm of love has completely overtaken her. Just looking at... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...bed, and as Beatie sleeps like a log through the night, it is most often Abigail who now attends Gibbie when he cannot sleep at nights. Abigail realizes that Gibbie is... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
One afternoon, after running home to escape a rain storm, Beatie tells Abigail that she has to talk to her. Abigail has noticed that Beatie has been more... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail is shocked and hurt. Beatie goes on to explain that because it was Judah who... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail leaps up, seizes Beatie by the shoulders, and shakes her before dropping her on the... (full context)
Chapter 9
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail enters Granny’s room, where Granny is sitting in a chair. Granny puts aside her knitting... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail looks into Granny’s eyes and hears Granny’s voice, far away—when she looks down at herself,... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Granny tells Abigail that she must know now, through the vision, that the young can experience true love—and... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail sits at the kitchen table washing potatoes. When Beatie comes out of the parlor after... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
On Sunday, Dovey prepares a picnic basket for Judah, Beatie, and Abigail, but as they prepare for the outing, Abigail feels only anxiety. As the three head... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Beatie runs ahead of Judah and Abigail through the empty streets down to the shore. Judah tells Beatie to slow down, as... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail asks what the ships in the harbor transport, and as she and Judah find themselves... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Judah pulls the little boat into a craggy cove, and instructs Abigail in how to track the shellfish and dig for them. As Abigail wanders the shore,... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
...the rocks. Judah orders Beatie to get in the boat, but Beatie refuses to go. Abigail sides with Beatie, saying she doesn’t mind staying a while longer, but then Beatie turns... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail and Judah shove off from the shore. Out on the water, Judah admires the land... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail tells Judah that she loves him, but he does not answer her. Abigail quickly tells... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...of truth or simply to calm Beatie—tells her that there is nothing between himself and Abigail at all. (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
In the boat, Abigail attempts to put a hand on Beatie’s shoulder, but Beatie shakes her off, and says... (full context)
Chapter 10
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...home. Beatie sits with her hands over her ears the whole time, but Judah assures Abigail that Beatie has always been stubborn this way, and her fits have grown worse since... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail assures Judah that Beatie won’t say anything to Dovey, as Beatie does not want to... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail chases Beatie, calling after her not to tell Dovey, but Beatie only calls Abigail “Judas”... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Abigail runs toward the shop, and Beatie follows her. The inside is full of smoke, and... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail tells Beatie to help Granny outside—Abigail herself will go up and save Dovey. She finds... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail wraps a wet quilt around her head and goes back inside to get Gibbie. Though... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
...of the Chinese men uses a pallet to make a safe landing for Gibbie and Abigail to jump down onto, and though Gibbie once again refuses to go, Abigail pushes him... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Out on the street, the fire is under control, but the shop is gone. Abigail feels weak and faint. She spots Granny, Dovey, and Beatie across the street and urges... (full context)
Chapter 11
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
The Tallisker-Bows are taken in by the butcher and his wife. Abigail is fussed over and acclaimed for her bravery in saving everyone from the fire. The... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Granny tells Abigail that she has at last done what she was sent to do—she saved Dovey for... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Granny tells Abigail that it must be Beatie alone who accompanies her back to the place where she... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail tells Beatie there’s no reason for Beatie to still be angry at her, but Beatie... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
At the end of the lane, Abigail tells Beatie that she should go to her teacher and ask to be tutored privately.... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail asks Beatie to stop hating her—Judah doesn’t love her after all, and Abigail did end... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Beatie does not answer Abigail, and so Abigail bids her a glum goodbye before continuing down the stairs to the... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail sees the Mitchell building, and hears the bells of the Town Hall clock. She wonders... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail picks up a nearby newspaper and is relieved to see that the date is the... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
When Abigail gets out of the bath, her mother is home. Despite the fact that they have... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail and Kathy apologize to each other, and resolve to say not another word about Weyland... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
In her dreams, Abigail has horrible visions of Samuel Bow chained up in an asylum. She sees Beatie, older... (full context)
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
In the morning, Abigail goes with her mother to work at Magpies, the vintage shop. As Kathy sets to... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail tells her mother that she is going to take a walk around the Rocks. Before... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail heads up Argyle Street toward the Rocks, feeling as if she is going home. The... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail feels as if the empty place inside her is empty once again—she cannot bear to... (full context)
Chapter 12
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
A few days after Abigail’s return, Kathy brings Weyland home for dinner. He greets his daughter as “Lynnie” and embraces... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Weyland tells Abigail all about Norway, and she admits that she is excited for a new adventure. He... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Abigail’s long years of keeping her feelings to herself prove useful during this time—she knows that... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail still takes Natalie and Vincent to the playground sometimes, but the children have given up... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail is determined to find out what became of all the Bows, and she wants to... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Abigail walks home in a daze, feeling as if her body is moving without her mind’s... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The scene begins to lose its color and fade. Abigail sees Granny look around searchingly for a moment, as if she has heard something, but... (full context)
Chapter 13
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Four years later, Abigail Kirk is nearly eighteen years old, and the Kirk family has returned to Sydney after... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
For the first year after her return from the past, Abigail’s memories of the Bow family were “bitterly real” and caused her grief and longing, especially... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail tells her mother that she’s going to go next door and see if the Crowns... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail tells Justine that she thought her husband’s name was Bill, and asks who Robert is—Justine... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
As Abigail hugs Natalie, she wonders whether Natalie truly remembers their time together. Just then, Natalie leans... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Crowns converse with one another casually, and then Justine introduces Abigail to the young man—her brother, Robert Bow. The young man, upon meeting Abigail’s eye, exclaims,... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
While Natalie opens her presents with Vincent and her mother, Robert and Abigail talk with one another. Abigail can hardly focus on Robert’s words, though—she is too overcome... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
As Robert and Abigail converse, she finds it easy and natural to talk to him. Robert tells Abigail that... (full context)
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
When Abigail returns to her own apartment, her mother asks her who she has met over at... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
...with his family Bible in hand. As the two of them sit down to begin, Abigail notices the small ways in which he looks, after all, quite different from Judah. They... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
In the kitchen, Robert opens the Bible to a page bearing the Bow family tree. Abigail, without looking at it, immediately asks where Robert’s great-grandfather, Judah is on it—Robert replies that... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
The Wisdom and Power of Children  Theme Icon
Robert asks Abigail to calm down and tell him how she knows so many things about his family—things... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
...a child named Judith, but it died alongside Dovey and Granny during a smallpox outbreak. Abigail marvels aloud that getting Gibbie out of the fire, more than Dovey, was important to... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Abigail spends a quiet moment thinking about Granny Tallisker and her “infinite goodness and strength.” Abigail... (full context)
Family, Duty, and Connection Theme Icon
The Transformative Power of Love Theme Icon
Time and the Past Theme Icon
Kathy comes into the kitchen and asks Abigail what she and Robert are up to. Abigail coyly replies that they are “just playing... (full context)