Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot Blacks

by

Horatio Alger

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Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot Blacks Quotes

Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot Blacks published in 1990.
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Chapter 1 Quotes

“Oh, I’m a rough customer,” said Dick. “But I wouldn’t steal. It’s mean.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker)
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:

Another of Dick's faults was his extravagance. Being always wide-awake and ready for business, he earned enough to have supported him comfortably and respectably. There were not a few young clerks who employed Dick from time to time in his professional capacity, who scarcely earned as much as he, greatly as their style and dress exceeded his. But Dick was careless of his earnings.

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:

I hope my young readers will like him as I do, without being blind to his faults. Perhaps, although he was only a boot-black, they may find something in him to imitate.

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter
Page Number: 8
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

Now, in the boot-blacking business, as well as in higher avocations, the same rule prevails, that energy and industry are rewarded, and indolence suffers. Dick was energetic and on the alert for business, but Johnny was the reverse. The consequence was that Dick earned probably three times as much as the other.

Related Symbols: Bootblacking Box, Restaurants
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

“I’m in luck,” thought our hero complacently. “I guess I’ll go to Barnum’s to-night, and see the bearded lady, the eight-foot giant, the two-foot dwarf, and the other curiosities, too numerous to mention.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker)
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:

“I’m afraid you haven’t washed your face this morning,” said Mr. Whitney […]

“They didn’t have no wash-bowls at the hotel where I stopped,” said Dick.

“What hotel did you stop at?”

“The Box Hotel.”
“The Box Hotel?”
“Yes, sir, I slept in a box on Spruce Street.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Mr. Whitney (speaker), Frank Whitney
Related Symbols: The Suit
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

When Dick was dressed in his new attire, with his face and hands clean, and his hair brushed, it was difficult to imagine that he was the same boy.

Related Symbols: The Suit
Page Number: 22
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

Dick succeeded in getting quite a neat-looking cap, which corresponded much better with his appearance than the one he had on. The last, not being considered worth keeping, Dick dropped on the sidewalk, from which, on looking back, he saw it picked up by a brother boot-black who appeared to consider it better than his own.

Related Symbols: The Suit, Bootblacking Box
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

Turning towards our hero, he said, “May I inquire, young man, whether you are largely invested in the Erie Railroad?”

Related Symbols: The Suit, Restaurants
Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

“Did you ever read the Bible?” asked Frank, who had some idea of the neglected state of Dick’s education.
“No,” said Dick. “I’ve heard it’s a good book, but I never read one. I ain’t much on readin’. It makes my head ache.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Frank Whitney (speaker)
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:

“Some boys is born with a silver spoon in their mouth. Victoria’s boys is born with a gold spoon, set with di’monds; but gold and silver was scarce when I was born, and mine was pewter.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Frank Whitney
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

Though Frank did not know it, one of the queen’s palaces is far from being as fine a looking building as the Fifth Avenue Hotel. St. James’ Palace is a very ugly-looking brick structure, and appears much more like a factory than like the home of royalty. There are few hotels in the world as fine-looking as this democratic institution.

Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

“I know his game,” whispered Dick. “Come along and you’ll see what it is.”

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Frank Whitney
Page Number: 43
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

I ain’t got no mother. She died when I wasn’t but three years old. My father went to sea; but he went off before mother died, and nothin’ was ever heard of him. I expect he got wrecked, or died at sea.

Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

There isn’t but one thing to do. Just give me back that money, and I’ll see that you’re not touched. If you don’t, I’ll give you up to the first p’liceman we meet.

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Frank Whitney
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

Save your money, my lad, buy books, and determine to be somebody, and you may yet fill an honorable position.

Related Symbols: The Suit
Page Number: 72
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

I’ll make a bargain with you. I can’t read much more’n a pig; and my writin’ looks like hens’ tracks. I don’t want to grow up knowin’ no more’n a four-year-old boy. If you’ll teach me readin’ and writin’ evenin’s, you shall sleep in my room every night.

Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

Mr. Henderson, this is a member of my Sunday school class, for whose good qualities and good abilities I can speak confidently.

Related Characters: Mr. Greyson (speaker), Henry Fosdick
Related Symbols: The Suit
Page Number: 127
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 24 Quotes

Dick read this letter with much satisfaction. It is always pleasant to be remembered, and Dick had so few friends that it was more to him than to boys who are better provided. Again, he felt a new sense of importance in having a letter addressed to him. It was the first letter he had ever received. If it had been sent to him a year before, he would not have been able to read it. But now, thanks to Fosdick's instructions, he could not only read writing, but he could write a very good hand himself.

Page Number: 160
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 25 Quotes

I've give up sleepin' in boxes, and old wagons, findin' it didn't agree with my constitution. I've hired a room in Mott Street, and have got a private tooter,

who rooms with me and looks after my studies in the evenin'. Mott Street ain't very fashionable; but my manshun on Fifth Avenoo isn't finished yet, and I'm afraid it won't be till I'm a gray-haired veteran. I've got a hundred dollars towards it, which I've saved from my earnin's. I haven't forgot what you and your uncle said to me, and I'm trying to grow up 'spectable.

Page Number: 165
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 27 Quotes

“…you were ‘Ragged Dick.’ You must drop that name, and think of yourself now as—”

“Richard Hunter, Esq.” said our hero, smiling.

“A young gentleman on the way to fame and fortune,” added Fosdick.

Related Characters: Richard “Ragged Dick” Hunter (speaker), Henry Fosdick (speaker)
Related Symbols: Bootblacking Box
Page Number: 178
Explanation and Analysis:
No matches.