Same Kind of Different as Me

Same Kind of Different as Me

by

Ron Hall and Denver Moore

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Same Kind of Different as Me: Chapter 35 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Ron continues his narration. as Deborah is battling cancer, she tells Ron that she wants to see Denver get a driver’s license, since she feels bad she cannot see him as often at the mission anymore. Due to several decades-old outstanding misdemeanors on Denver’s record, the process takes ten months and several phone calls, but Denver finally gets his license.
The act of getting a driver’s license seems particularly significant for Denver, since it is the first time he is described as receiving any sort of validation of who he is from the government. Being recognized as a legal driver seems a great contrast to his earlier life, when he was not even recognized as a free and autonomous person by the Man.
Themes
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Regan decides to move to Colorado to work at a Christian camp, but needs her belongings driven down there. When Ron jokes that Denver could do it, Denver takes him seriously and Ron realizes that he must follow through. Ron sets Denver up with $700 in cash, a $30,000 truck full of his daughter’s belongings, and a map with directions drawn out, and sends him on his way. As he watches Denver leave, he wonders if this is a mistake.
Ron’s growing trust in Denver is apparent, demonstrated by the fact that he sent Denver with so much money and expensive possessions at all, even if Ron does have his doubts. This act of trust on Ron’s part is a large risk, and thus represents a powerful gesture to Denver. Rather than thinking of Denver as a homeless vagrant, Ron treats him as a trusted friend.
Themes
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon