Same Kind of Different as Me

Same Kind of Different as Me

by

Ron Hall and Denver Moore

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Denver Moore Character Analysis

Denver Moore is one of the two narrators of the story, the other being Ron Hall. Denver, a black man, works as a Louisiana sharecropper for the first three decades of his life, where he experiences extreme poverty, constant loss, racist violence and discrimination, and modern-day slavery, proving that such institutions are alive and well in the twentieth century. As a sharecropper, Denver never receives an education and so has few opportunities for self-betterment, but he escapes the sharecropping life when he hops on a train to Fort Worth, Texas. After many hard years living on the streets and a decade in prison—which develop him into a hardened, violent man—Denver arrives at Fort Worth’s Union Gospel Mission, a Christian homeless shelter, where he meets Ron and Deborah. Although Denver keeps his distance for a long time, he eventually befriends both of them, realizing how much they genuinely love and care for the homeless community. As Denver’s relationship with Ron and Deborah and his relationship with God grows, Denver begins to transform into loving and loyal friend and immensely compassionate figure. When Deborah is diagnosed with cancer, Denver becomes an enormous emotional support for Ron, buoying Ron’s own failing faith with Denver’s powerful belief in God’s wisdom and control. After Deborah’s death, Denver becomes Ron’s family, moving in with him, joining Ron in his work, and ultimately telling their story together and becoming an inspirational speaker. Through his transformation from modern slave and homeless man to national speaker and leader, Denver demonstrates the human potential inherent in every person and counters the common idea that homeless people have somehow earned their fate through their poor character, demonstrating that rather, they have most often been victimized by painful circumstances or oppressive systems.

Denver Moore Quotes in Same Kind of Different as Me

The Same Kind of Different as Me quotes below are all either spoken by Denver Moore or refer to Denver Moore. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Thomas Nelson edition of Same Kind of Different as Me published in 2006.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Folks say the bayou in Red River Parish is full to its pea-green brim with the splintery bones of colored folks that white men done fed to the gators for covetin their women, or maybe just lookin cross-eyed. Wadn’t like it happened ever day. But the chance of it, the threat of it, hung over the cotton fields like a ghost.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 3
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

The incident firmly fixed my image of homeless people as a ragtag army of ants bent in ruining decent people’s picnics.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

A lotta folks called [sharecropping] a new kinda slavery. Lotta croppers (even white ones, what few there was in Louisiana) didn’t have just one massa, thye had two. The first massa was the Man that owned the land you was workin. The second massa was whoever owned the store where you got your goods on credit. Someimes both a’ them was the same Man; sometimes it was a different Man.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

Purty soon [Bobby’s] people figured out we was friends, but they didn’t really try to keep us from associatin, ‘specially since I was the only boy on the place right around his age and he needed somebody to play with and keep outta trouble. They detected he was givin me food, so they put a little wood table outside the back door for met to eat on. After a while, once Bobby’d get his food, he’d come right on out and me and him’d sit at that little table and eat together.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Bobby
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 39-40
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

Things was a-changin. Uncle James took sick and died, and Aunt Etha moved away. Last time I seen her, she was cryin. I couldn’t figure out why God kept takin all the folks I loved the most.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Big Mama, Uncle James, Aunt Etha, BB
Page Number: 47
Explanation and Analysis:

Lookin back, I figure what them boys done caused me to get a little throwed off in life. And for sure I wadn’t gon’ be offerin to help no white ladies no more.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Ron Hall, Deborah Hall
Page Number: 50
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

It got to be the 1960s. All them years I worked for them plantations, the Man didn’t tell me there was colored schools I coulda gone to, or that I coulda learned a trade […] I didn’t know about World War II, the war in Korea, or the one in Vietnam. And I didn’t know colored folks had been risin up all around Louisiana for years, demandin better treatment.

I didn’t know I was different.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 64
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

In those days, a man in Angola without a knife was either gon’ wind up raped or dead. For the first few years I was there, at least forty men got stabbed to death and another bunch, hundreds of em, got cut up bad. I did what I had to do to protect myself.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker)
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

Another thought nagged at me, though. Could it possibly be something he saw in me—something he didn’t like? Maybe he felt like the target of a blow-dried white hunter searching for a trophy to show off to friends, one he bagged after a grueling four-month safari in the inner city. Meanwhile, if I caught him, what would I do with him?

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 24 Quotes

It was at Starbucks that I learned about twentieth-century slavery. Not the slavery of auction blocks, of young blacks led away in ropes and chains. Instead, it was a slavery of debt-bondage, poverty, ignorance, and exploitation. A slavery in which the Man, of whom Denver’s “Man” was only one among many, held all the cards and dealt them mostly from the bottom of the deck, the way his daddy had taught him, and his granddaddy before that.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore, Granddaddy / Jack Brooks
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 33 Quotes

[…] Sometimes we just have to accept the things we don’t understand. So I just tried to accept that Miss Debbie was sick and kept on prayin out there by that dumpster. I felt like it was the most important job I ever had, and I wadn’t gon’ quit.

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Ron Hall, Deborah Hall
Page Number: 140
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

The campfires and camaraderie worked magic on Denver as he began to know what it was like to be accepted and loved by a group of white guys on horseback with ropes in their hands. Exactly the kind of people he had feared all his life.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore
Page Number: 156
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 41 Quotes

“You asked the man how you could bless him, and he told you he wanted two things—cigarettes and Ensure. Now you trying to judge him instead of blessin him by blessin him with only half the things he asked for. […] Cigarettes is the only pleasure he got left.”

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Mr. Ballantine , Scott Walker
Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 51 Quotes

Quietly, I asked the nurse to remove the tubes and IVs that had bound her for a month. Then I asked the nurse to give us a few minutes alone, during which I held my dead wife and wept, begging God to raise her as Christ had raised Lazarus.

When He didn’t—and I truly believed he could—my heart exploded.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore, Deborah Hall
Page Number: 188
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 57 Quotes

And now that Deborah was gone, I had begun to suspect [Denver] felt like a hanger-on. I didn’t feel that way about him at all. In fact, during her illness and since her death, I had come to consider him my brother.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore, Deborah Hall
Page Number: 206
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 63 Quotes

What kind of man was the Man? For decades, one Man kept sharecroppers barefoot and poor, but let a little colored boy earn a brand-new red Schwinn. Another Man let an old black woman live on his place rent-free long after she’d stopped working in the fields. A third Man kept Denver ignorant and dependent, but provided for him well beyond the time he probably could have done without his labor.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 65 Quotes

“Mr. Ron, they’re livin better than I ever did when I was livin here. Now you know it was the truth when I told you that bein homeless in Fort Worth was a step up in life for me.”

Related Characters: Denver Moore (speaker), Ron Hall
Page Number: 225
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 66 Quotes

Still, I can’t deny the fruit of Deborah’s death—Denver, the new man, and the hundreds of men, women, and children who will be helped because of the new mission. And so, I release her back to God.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore, Deborah Hall
Page Number: 231
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Same Kind of Different as Me LitChart as a printable PDF.
Same Kind of Different as Me PDF

Denver Moore Character Timeline in Same Kind of Different as Me

The timeline below shows where the character Denver Moore appears in Same Kind of Different as Me. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver explains that prior to meeting Deborah, he had never had a real conversation with a... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
“That’s just how things was in Louisiana in those days,” Denver explains. Such racist violence happened in Mississippi too—a few years later, Emmett Till would be... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
During all the years that Denver works the fields in Red River Parish, he can hear a freight train passing through... (full context)
Chapter 3
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver explains that he never knew his mama and was raised by his grandparents PawPaw and... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver explains the concept of sharecropping: the Man owns the farm land and sells the clothing,... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver and his brother Thurman live with Big Mama and PawPaw in a three-room shack with... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
When Denver is around five or six years old, he wakes in the middle of the night... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver hears the fire spreading up the chimney and to the roof. Ducking below the smoke,... (full context)
Chapter 5
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver continues the story of his childhood. After Big Mama’s house burns down, someone takes Thurman... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
After BB dies, Denver and Thurman go to live with Uncle James and Aunt Etha, who are sharecroppers. Although... (full context)
Chapter 7
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
When Denver is seven or eight, he gets his first cotton sack. Every day, when he brings... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
One day, as Denver is walking home, a white boy named Bobby approaches him and asks him to ride... (full context)
Chapter 9
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Every Sunday, Denver and his family ride a wagon to church—which also functions as a social center—to hear... (full context)
Chapter 10
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Time passes and life changes for Denver. Uncle James dies, Aunt Etha moves away, and Denver and Thurman are separated and sent... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver remarks that the separation between white people and black people isn’t enforced just by the... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Bobby and his aunt drive Denver to his Auntie’s house, where he spends the next week in bed. The bruising goes... (full context)
Chapter 13
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. When Denver is eighteen or nineteen, a plantation owner gives Denver a... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver works the Man’s land for almost thirty years, never receiving a paycheck. He never realizes... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Denver catches word that Thurman is somewhere in California, making lots of money. One day, he... (full context)
Chapter 15
Homelessness Theme Icon
Denver and the other man ride their train to Dallas and catch another to Fort Worth,... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Living on the streets in Fort Worth, Denver learns the methods of hustling to make one dollar into a few dollars, bathing in... (full context)
Chapter 17
Homelessness Theme Icon
Denver explains that despite what many think, there is a code of honor in the “hobo... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
When three gang members try to rob Denver, he scares them off with a metal pipe, hops into his friend’s car (which had... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
In May 1968, Denver is sentenced to twenty years in Angola prison, the “darkest, most vicious prison in America.... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver is released from prison after ten years and returns to Fort Worth, where he winds... (full context)
Chapter 18
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
...is a lie. After a few months, Ron and Deborah finally learn his name is Denver, but he is “about as approachable as an electric cattle fence.” (full context)
Chapter 19
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. Ron and Deborah interfere with what was otherwise a controlled life. Despite... (full context)
Chapter 20
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
...thrill of anticipation of spending time at the Union Gospel Mission. Ron continues to see Denver, but even using Denver’s name seems to irritate him and he keeps his distance. (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
...up two carloads of homeless people, each dressed in the best things they could find. Denver is there too, wearing a suit. On the drive, Ron tries to make conversation but... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
After the evening has ended and everyone is loading back into the cars, Denver approaches Ron and apologizes for avoiding him after he and Deborah had just been trying... (full context)
Chapter 21
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. After watching Ron and Deborah all those months, Denver is convinced... (full context)
Chapter 22
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. When he tells Deborah about his breakfast date with Denver, she is ecstatic, and they both pray together that God would “show [them] how to... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver finally asks Ron what he wants from him, and Ron tells him that he only... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron doesn’t see Denver for another week, but when he spots him on the sidewalk he invites him for... (full context)
Chapter 23
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver admits that at first, he doesn’t like the idea of being Ron’s friend. For Denver,... (full context)
Chapter 24
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. Denver’s sincerity and seriousness with which he treats friendship makes a deep impression on Ron. Ron... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
During their coffee meetings, Ron learns about “twentieth-century slavery” and the way that Denver and people like him have been controlled through ignorance, debt bondage, and slavery by the... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
As Ron learns, he becomes enraged about the Man and hates him, telling Denver’s story to “anyone who would listen.” However, after some weeks, Ron realizes with shame that... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver proves to be a wealth of such practical insights. Ron gives Denver his phone number... (full context)
Chapter 25
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. He and Ron continue spending time together, with Denver showing Ron... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver first met Sister Bettie before Ron and Deborah came to the Union Gospel Mission. After... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Denver starts helping Sister Bettie feed other homeless people at the Lot—“one a’ the worst neighborhoods... (full context)
Chapter 26
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Ron and Denver’s friendship continues, but Denver feels guilty facing the people on the street he’s hurt or... (full context)
Chapter 27
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. Deborah invites Denver to a Christian wilderness retreat and constantly encourages... (full context)
Chapter 28
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
As Ron’s relationship with Denver grows, his art business also continues to expand. One day, Ron gets “the kind of... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
...is ecstatic, claiming that it has been an excellent weekend at the retreat, reporting that Denver played piano and sang to God in front of a crowd of people. Ron looks... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Finally, Denver calls from the hospital and Ron goes to see him. It turns out that Denver... (full context)
Chapter 30
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. When Deborah does not show up for Bible Study that week, Mary... (full context)
Chapter 32
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
...the homeless people, who are already gathered to pray for Deborah. When Ron notices that Denver is not there, Chef Jim tells him that he is sleeping. When Ron assumes that... (full context)
Chapter 33
Homelessness Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. Denver spends all night praying for Deborah next to the dumpster, where... (full context)
Chapter 35
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
...his narration. as Deborah is battling cancer, she tells Ron that she wants to see Denver get a driver’s license, since she feels bad she cannot see him as often at... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
...at a Christian camp, but needs her belongings driven down there. When Ron jokes that Denver could do it, Denver takes him seriously and Ron realizes that he must follow through.... (full context)
Chapter 36
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver knows he’s an honest man, but he is still surprised that Ron trusts him with... (full context)
Chapter 37
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron picks up his narration. When Denver does not arrive on schedule, Ron begins to panic, wondering if the temptation to run... (full context)
Chapter 38
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. Denver arrives back on Ron’s doorstep, with a huge smile, truck in perfect condition. He hands... (full context)
Chapter 40
Reconciliation Theme Icon
...a vengeance.” As spring comes, the family goes to their ranch at Rocky Top, taking Denver with them this year. While they are there, Ron invites him to a cowboy camping... (full context)
Christian Faith Theme Icon
...health continues to decline, as does her spirit. After church one day, Ron, Deborah, and Denver are visiting with Scott and Janina, friends of theirs. Denver announces that he needs to... (full context)
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Years before, Denver met Mr. Ballantine on the street, a sour old drunk whose family had rejected him.... (full context)
Chapter 41
Homelessness Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. Denver brings Scott with him to see Mr. Ballantine, but he worries... (full context)
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Mr. Ballantine, surprised that Scott paid for the cigarettes, asks Denver why someone would do something like that. Denver tells Mr. Ballantine it is because both... (full context)
Chapter 44
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. Carson informs Denver that Deborah is near death, so Denver goes... (full context)
Chapter 45
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. Ron is enveloped with grief, and so cannot remember everything that Denver told him, but is comforted by Denver’s assertion that Deborah won’t die until the right... (full context)
Chapter 47
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver come to their house the next morning and tells Ron that the night before, God... (full context)
Christian Faith Theme Icon
...Deborah continues to live, despite all of the doctors’ constant predictions, and Ron realizes that Denver’s visions have been more accurate so far than any of the medical experts. Denver visits... (full context)
Chapter 48
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
The next morning, Denver arrives at the house again, stating that he is there to deliver a message from... (full context)
Chapter 49
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. After his meeting with Ron and Carson, Denver goes to Deborah’s... (full context)
Chapter 52
Christian Faith Theme Icon
...Ron feels nothing but bitterness towards God. The memorial service ends and Ron leaves, but Denver stays behind with the pallbearers to lower the casket into the ground. (full context)
Chapter 53
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. After lowering Deborah’s casket into the ground, Denver sits on a... (full context)
Chapter 54
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
The following day, the family holds a larger memorial service at the church. Denver speaks, sharing his own life story, the love that Deborah showed him, and the powerful... (full context)
Chapter 56
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Denver picks up his narration. Don Shisler invites Denver to a National Philanthropy Day ceremony at... (full context)
Chapter 57
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. Denver receives another standing ovation at the National Philanthropy Day ceremony when he receives a philanthropy... (full context)
Reconciliation Theme Icon
That Thanksgiving, Ron and Denver sit at Rocky Top and reminisce as Ron tries to endure the pain of a... (full context)
Chapter 58
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Denver continues his narration. Although he was happy to go to Rocky Top with Ron, Denver... (full context)
Chapter 59
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Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron picks up his narration. Ron and Denver set to work building a stone wall around Deborah’s grave, large enough to hold a... (full context)
Chapter 60
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
Denver narrates that the following May, they dedicate the cemetery with a small ceremony. Denver stands... (full context)
Chapter 61
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Ron continues his narration. Ron and Denver begin discussing the idea of writing down their story together, but Ron feels as if... (full context)
Chapter 62
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Denver explains that he is anxious about returning to Red River Parish and the memories that... (full context)
Chapter 63
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Ron picks up his narration. The contrast between the Man’s large, elegant house and Denver’s tiny shack “disgust[s]” Ron. As they drive to Denver’s sister Hershalee’s old house, Ron considers... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Christian Faith Theme Icon
When Ron and Denver reach Hershalee’s shack, they enter, but immediately find that the small house has an eerie... (full context)
Chapter 64
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Denver picks up his narration. At first, Denver thinks the noise is just an animal or... (full context)
Chapter 65
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Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Ron picks up his narration. After their car returns to normal, Ron and Denver keep driving to look for another of Denver’s relatives, Aunt Pearlie May. They find her... (full context)
Chapter 66
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The following Sunday, Ron and Denver visit a church in a depressed part of Fort Worth, whose pastor heard of Denver’s... (full context)
Chapter 67
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Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
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Denver picks up his narration. Although Denver once feared Ron might abandon him, Ron asks Denver... (full context)
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Denver recalls how he used to worry about being different from others until he met Deborah... (full context)