Same Kind of Different as Me

Same Kind of Different as Me

by

Ron Hall and Denver Moore

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Granddaddy / Jack Brooks Character Analysis

Jack Brooks is Ron and John’s grandfather and the owner of a Texas cotton farm, where Ron and John spend their childhood summers picking cotton. Jack Brooks is described as a hardworking honorable man who pays a fair wage to his workers, regardless of whether they are black or white, and even makes no-interest loans to poor black families to get them through hard winters. Because of this, Jack Brooks is widely respected in the black community of his town. Even so, as a white man and a farmer, Jack Brooks participates in and complies with the racial segregation and discrimination pervasive in the American South. As a character, Jack Brooks represents the closest corollary Ron has to the Man, even though he is not a sharecropper. Through Ron’s pain at realizing that his beloved Granddaddy is not so different from the Man who oppressed Denver, the narrative complicates the symbol of the Man, depicting him as a dynamic human being, as complex as any, possessing both noble and ignoble qualities.

Granddaddy / Jack Brooks Quotes in Same Kind of Different as Me

The Same Kind of Different as Me quotes below are all either spoken by Granddaddy / Jack Brooks or refer to Granddaddy / Jack Brooks. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Thomas Nelson edition of Same Kind of Different as Me published in 2006.
Chapter 4 Quotes

As far as I knew, their first names were “Nigger” and their last names were like our first names: Bill, Charlie, Jim, and so forth […] none of them were ever called by a proper first and last name like mine, Ronnie Ray Hall, or my granddaddy’s, Jack Brooks.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Granddaddy / Jack Brooks
Page Number: 22
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 24 Quotes

It was at Starbucks that I learned about twentieth-century slavery. Not the slavery of auction blocks, of young blacks led away in ropes and chains. Instead, it was a slavery of debt-bondage, poverty, ignorance, and exploitation. A slavery in which the Man, of whom Denver’s “Man” was only one among many, held all the cards and dealt them mostly from the bottom of the deck, the way his daddy had taught him, and his granddaddy before that.

Related Characters: Ron Hall (speaker), Denver Moore, Granddaddy / Jack Brooks
Related Symbols: The Man
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:
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Granddaddy / Jack Brooks Character Timeline in Same Kind of Different as Me

The timeline below shows where the character Granddaddy / Jack Brooks appears in Same Kind of Different as Me. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
...cotton. Like his mama, Ron and his brother John spend their summers farming cotton on Granddaddy’s farm, which they prefer to the alternative: following their daddy around as he disappears into... (full context)
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Ron and John inherit Granddaddy’s penchant for pranks, which often earns them beatings with a switch from their grandmother MawMaw’s... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Granddaddy slightly resembles the black shoeshine who lives in town, an old man whom everyone loves,... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
...particularly good or bad; many of the black people from across the tracks work for Granddaddy. He recalls, “As far as I knew, all their first names were ‘Nigger’ and their... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
Each morning, Granddaddy drives his truck across the railroad tracks and whoever wants to work that day climbs... (full context)
Chapter 6
Charity, Love, and Ego Theme Icon
Ron spends summers working on his Granddaddy’s farm until 1963, when he goes to college at East Texas State. His whole world... (full context)
Chapter 24
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Homelessness Theme Icon
Reconciliation Theme Icon
...“anyone who would listen.” However, after some weeks, Ron realizes with shame that his granddaddy Jack Brooks had not been so different from the Man. He did pay an actual wage, but... (full context)