Scythe

by

Neal Shusterman

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Scythe: Chapter 33 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Scythe Faraday writes in his journal that immortality robs people of their innocence and youth. He says that every time he gleans, he mourns for who he was as a boy. He longs to one day become that boy again.
This explains why Faraday quietly stepped away from his life as a scythe: he recognizes that gleaning does make him feel numb and old, and in a world where few come of age, staying emotionally young is compelling.
Themes
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Mortality and Life Theme Icon
Morality, Compassion, and Choices Theme Icon
Related Quotes
Citra carries Faraday inside and bandages his leg. He begins to wake and refuses to let her take him to a hospital—that would alert the Scythedom to the fact that he's alive, not gleaned. Half joking, he asks if Citra was so upset that he self-gleaned that she came to exact revenge. She explains that she thought he was Gerald Van Der Gans, and he says that was his childhood name. He asks again why Citra is here. Citra explains what happened since his disappearance. He explains that Curie is the only scythe who knows he's alive. A rainstorm moves through and Faraday says that Citra needs to sleep, as tomorrow they're going to study poisons—after all, Citra is still his apprentice.
This exchange reveals that Curie sent Citra to Faraday so that Citra could continue her training, in the hopes that if Curie can clear Citra's name at home, Citra will be allowed to take her final test and become a scythe. Faraday's willingness to resume Citra's training speaks to his sense of responsibility to Citra and to the Scythedom, which he certainly still feels connected to on some level and definitely doesn't want to see fall into Goddard's hands.
Themes
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Mortality and Life Theme Icon
Surveillance, Corruption, and Justice Theme Icon
Morality, Compassion, and Choices Theme Icon