Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

by

Becky Albertalli

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Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda: Chapter 33 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
On Monday, Simon spots Bram in English class and thinks he looks adorable sitting next to Garrett. Garrett compliments Simon's performance and explains that Bram made him go to the play three times. Simon has no idea what to say, so he asks if Bram did the reading. Mr. Wise calls the class to order and Simon tries to pay attention, but he can't concentrate. He looks onto Bram's book and their knees touch as they read. After class, Abby comments that she didn't know Simon and Bram were good friends.
Though it's somewhat unclear if Bram is out to Garrett, it's definitely clear that Garrett and Bram have a very close friendship, and that Garrett is willing to support Bram, even for something as seemingly trivial as seeing the school play three times. This reinforces the importance of treating others' requests with kindness and as though they're important.
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Bram shows up at Simon's locker right before lunch and suggests they go off campus. Only seniors are allowed to do so, but they decide to risk it. In Bram's car, he gives Simon free rein of the music. Bram pulls into a spot at the local grocery store and tells Simon to go find a pint of milk. Simon ignores texts from Abby and does as he's told. When he and Bram reconvene, Bram has gotten mini Oreo cups and spoons.
Bram's shopping list is a way for him to show Simon how closely he's been paying attention and how much he cares for him. This again shows Simon the importance of truly getting to know people, as this makes Simon feel seen in a way he hasn't felt before.
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They eat in the car. Simon says, "Abraham," and then leans in to kiss Bram. After they kiss, they turn back to their Oreos. Simon asks if Bram is ready to be out to people at school, and Bram says he's all in if Simon wants to be his boyfriend. Simon grins. That night, both Bram and Simon change their Facebook statuses. Simon declines to call Alice and tell her about it and instead, calls Bram. They joke about posting kissing selfies on Facebook.
By recognizing their relationship on Facebook, Bram and Simon are able to show each other and the rest of their friends how much they care about each other. This is also a major announcement of their identities as gay young men, which shows them coming even more fully into their mature identities.
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The next day, Abby asks Simon what's going on with Bram. Simon blushes, and Abby tells him he's cute and sends him away. At lunch, Simon leads Bram to the auditorium. They lock themselves in the dressing room, kiss for a while, and then settle in to talk. Bram says that according to Blue’s dad, Casanova was bisexual. Simon feels very in love and texts Bram that he misses him as soon as he gets home.
Bram's dad's mention that Casanova was bisexual comes across as a way for his dad to try to show Bram that he does truly care about him and who he is as a person. Casanova's autobiography does contain some veiled references to exploits with men, which offers hope that Bram's dad is more accepting than Bram initially thought.
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Mom notices that Simon is in an unusually good mood, but Simon declines to explain why. He hears Nora get home and is surprised to see that Leah drove Nora home. Mom insists that Simon can't go outside to talk to her since he's still grounded, but agrees to let him go in exchange for five minutes on Simon's Facebook to look at Bram. Before Leah can say anything, Simon jumps into the passenger seat. Leah tells Simon to get out, but he refuses and asks her to take him to Waffle House. She angrily agrees.
The negotiation between Mom and Simon suggests that both of them are holding up their end of their agreement, which shows that Simon's family is indeed capable of changing for the better. Simon's insistence on speaking with Leah shows that he's finally taking it to heart that he must have hard conversations with people in order to maintain his relationships with them.
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Simon tries to apologize and asks if their friendship is over. Leah accuses Simon of being platonically obsessed with Abby and calls Abby an upgraded female best friend. She refuses to listen when Simon assures her that she's his best friend. Simon explains that he came out to Abby first because Leah and Nick know him too well, and he doesn't have that history with Abby. He says that let him try on being gay with her first, and then it just got harder and harder to bring up with Leah. Simon asks Leah what happened with her dad. She says he left for a nineteen-year-old and didn't come back. Simon is distraught that he went six years without asking. He starts to sob and apologizes for everything. Leah even cries a little bit.
Leah's admissions show that what she's most insecure about is that Abby is taking over her place as Simon's best friend, though it's important to note that Simon and Abby have been able to have more of the tough conversations the novel insists are necessary. This indicates that Leah will also need to make some changes in order to make her friendship with Simon fulfilling for both of them. Simon's decision to ask about Leah's dad shows that he finally understands the importance of recognizing his friends.
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