Snow Falling on Cedars

by

David Guterson

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Snow Falling on Cedars can help.

Carl Heine, Jr. Character Analysis

The fisherman around whose murder trial the novel is centered. Carl Heine was friends with Kabuo Miyamoto, the accused, in childhood. The two grew distant after the war, due to Carl’s Mother, Etta’s, bigotry toward people of Japanese descent, but also because of Carl’s personal prejudices. Carl was WWII veteran and, like his mother, harbors prejudices against people of Japanese descent. Before Carl’s death, Kabuo approached the man, wanting to buy back his family’s land. Carl seemed to want to do the right thing and sell the land to Kabuo, but his prejudices initially held him back. When he was alive, Carl often struggled with expressing himself, and Kabuo feels he and Carl were very much alike in this respect. The reader ultimately discovers that Carl wasn’t murdered, but, rather, was tragically thrown from his ship and drowned in a most unlikely accident.

Carl Heine, Jr. Quotes in Snow Falling on Cedars

The Snow Falling on Cedars quotes below are all either spoken by Carl Heine, Jr. or refer to Carl Heine, Jr.. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of Snow Falling on Cedars published in 1995.
Chapter 2 Quotes

All in all, Art decided, Carl Heine was a good man. He was silent, yes, and grave like his mother, but the war had a part in that, Art realized. Carl rarely laughed, but he did not seem, to Art’s way of thinking, unhappy or dissatisfied.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr., Art Moran
Page Number: 16
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

Thus on San Piedro the silent-toiling, autonomous gill-netter became the collective image of the good man. He who was too gregarious, who spoke too much and too ardently desired the company of others, their conversation and their laughter, did not have what life required.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr., Art Moran
Page Number: 38-39
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

Carl Heine’s dark struggle, his effort to hold his breath, the volume of water that had filled the vacuum of his gut, his profound unconsciousness and final convulsions, his terminal gasps in the grip of death as the last of the air leaked out of him and his heart halted and his brain ceased to consider anything—they were all recorded, or not recorded, in the slab of flesh that lay on Horace Whaley’s examination table. It was his duty to find out the truth.

Related Characters: Carl Heine, Jr., Horace Whaley
Page Number: 55
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

Sitting where he sat now, accused of the murder of Carl Heine, it seemed to him he’d found the suffering place he’d fantasized and desired. For Kabuo Miyamoto was suffering in his cell from the fear of his imminent judgment. Perhaps it was now his fate to pay for the lives he had taken in anger.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 169
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

Art Moran looked into the Jap’s eyes to see if he could discern the truth there. But they were hard eyes set in a proud, still face, and there was nothing to be read in them either way. They were the eyes of a man with concealed emotions, the eyes of a man hiding something. “You’re under arrest,” repeated Art Moran, “in connection with the death of Carl Heine.”

Related Characters: Art Moran (speaker), Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 269
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 27 Quotes

“I’m an American,” Kabuo cut in. “Just like you or anybody. Am I calling you a Nazi, you big Nazi bastard? I killed men who looked just like you—pig-fed German bastards. I’ve got blood on my soul, Carl, and it doesn’t wash off very easily. So don’t you talk to me about Japs, you big Nazi son of a bitch.”

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto (speaker), Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 404
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Snow Falling on Cedars LitChart as a printable PDF.
Snow Falling on Cedars PDF

Carl Heine, Jr. Character Timeline in Snow Falling on Cedars

The timeline below shows where the character Carl Heine, Jr. appears in Snow Falling on Cedars. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...proceedings,” other people think it “veil[s] a fear of the verdict that [is] to come.” Carl Heine, the gill-netter for whose murder Kabuo is convicted, was well-known in the town; the... (full context)
Chapter 2
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...the morning of September 16 when his deputy, Abel Martinson, announced over the radio that Carl Heine’s fishing boat “had been sighted adrift in White Sand Bay.” Moran relates to the... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
The night before Carl’s death, Moran recalls, had been very foggy. He describes the morning he and Abel Martinson... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Art suggested that they check to see if Carl’s dinghy was over the reel; it was. After a quiet moment, Abel proposed that they... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
As the men searched for Carl, Art thought about the missing fisherman, whom he’d been fond of. Carl was of German... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...vast sea that surrounded them on all sides with a sense of fear—a fear that Carl’s death only perpetuates. (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
As the men prepared to bring up Carl’s net, Art considered whether he should warn Abel of the possibility that Carl would be... (full context)
Chapter 3
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...He also asks Moran to verify that there’d been a spare six-celled D-8 battery on Carl’s boat; there had been, and it’d been dead. There were also two D-8 batteries on... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Gudmundsson asks whether it’s possible that Abel and Moran might have given Carl the bump on his head in their attempts to bring him aboard the ship when... (full context)
Chapter 4
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...faces “appear quiet and even faintly reverent.” Ishmael Chambers recalls how he found out about Carl’s death the morning of September 16. He’d been in the newspaper office and called the... (full context)
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Ishmael stops daydreaming about Arthur and redirects his thoughts to the morning of Carl’s death. The morning of September 16, Ishmael had arrived at the Amity Harbor docks to... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...Art in talking to the fishermen, trying to learn more about the last night of Carl’s life. The fishermen offered that they’d seen Carl’s ship, the Susan Marie, out on Ship... (full context)
Chapter 5
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...the Island County coroner, testifies to Alvin Hooks. He describes the autopsy he performed on Carl’s corpse. He’d found a watch in Carl’s pocket, which had stopped at 1:47. Carl’s body... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
As he worked, Horace recalled Carl’s silence and unreadable temperament in life, noting that, though “the man seemed to have no... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Horace continued to examine Carl, as “it was his duty to find out the truth.” He then saw the wound... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...during the Pacific War. Horace admitted that, while “anything could have happened,” the wound on Carl’s head struck him as “funny.” Art agreed and asked Horace whether it’s possible someone hit... (full context)
Chapter 6
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...Nels emphasizes that, according to Horace’s testimony, the presence of the foam is proof that Carl died by drowning, not by murder, specifically—which is also what Horace stated in his autopsy... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...part of the autopsy report, in which Horace noted the presence of another wound, on Carl’s right hand. Horace reveals that the wound had been fresh. Nels then asks Horace about... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...in Nels’s interrogation and in Horace’s discomfort. He remembers the dread he felt driving to Carl’s house to inform Carl’s wife, Susan Marie, of Carl’s death, and his thoughts turn to... (full context)
Chapter 9
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
...Kabuo. He forces himself to look away. When the court returns after the recess, it’s Carl Heine’s mother’s turn to testify. Etta Heine is a weathered old woman who spent decades... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Carl Sr. had a heart attack and died in 1944. Alvin Hooks, the prosecutor, is excited... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...house: Zenhichi asked to speak with her husband, and the two men left the room. Carl Sr. returned, explaining that Zenhichi wanted to buy seven acres of his land. Etta insisted... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...to the witness stand to continue with her testimony. Etta tells Hooks that Zenhichi and Carl Sr. had worked out a “lease-to-own” contract for the land. Zenhichi would pay Carl $250... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...a lease; in reality, however, the lease agreement served as a legal loophole through which Carl Sr. could sell the seven acres to Zenhichi Miyamoto. At any rate, explains Judge Fielding,... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...their last installments: people of Japanese ancestry had been ordered to relocate to internment camps. Carl Sr. was appalled by this news, but Etta was less sympathetic: “They’re Japs,” she told... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...to figure out how they’d handle the land in light of the family’s forthcoming relocation. Carl Sr. expressed sympathy. Etta scoffed as Zenhichi tried to discuss payments and as he offered... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...her testimony: Zenhichi, she reveals, offered to pay the Heines $120 on the spot, but Carl Sr. refused to take it, as he knew that the Miyamotos would need that money... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Continuing with her testimony, Etta recalls that Carl Jr. had returned later with fishing rod that Kabuo had loaned him. Without hesitation, Etta... (full context)
Chapter 10
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Kabuo replied that he had talked to Ole, who had no idea that Carl Sr. had sold the seven acres to Zenhichi. Etta scoffed at the idea that she... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...that Kabuo gives her angry looks any time he sees her, and she says that Carl Jr. knew all about the feud and that was wary of Kabuo. Etta insists that... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...and decided to sell his land, putting it on the market shortly after Labor Day. Carl Heine Jr. had approached him first and Ole sold the land to Carl. Carl admitted... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...he’d already sold the land, Kabuo “stiffened.” His face was unreadable. Ole told Kabuo that Carl Heine had bought the land earlier that day. (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Carl Heine dropped by Ole’s house the next day to take down the “For Sale” sign... (full context)
Chapter 11
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...that his family’s warrior past has sealed his fate. Kabuo believes that being accused of Carl Heine’s murder and the unfair trial that followed was meant to be. He feels doomed... (full context)
Chapter 17
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
The next piece of rope (C) was found on Carl’s boat. It is new, and has an intricate, hand-braided knot at the ends, which is... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...was inspired to investigate something as small as “a new mooring line” after talking with Carl’s relatives, who’d brought Art up to speed on Carl’s supposed bad blood with Kabuo Miyamoto.... (full context)
Chapter 18
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
The evening of September 16, the day he discovered Carl Heine’s body, Art Moran went to Judge Lew Fielding to obtain a warrant to search... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...had taken five hours so far. He remembered Horace Whaley’s condescending “Sherlock Holmes” remark during Carl’s autopsy. He also remembered telling Susan Marie about Carl’s death earlier that day. Though Moran... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...“a proud, still face.” He placed Kabuo under arrest “in connection with the death of Carl Heine.” (full context)
Chapter 19
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...human blood, and that he identified it as B-positive. He checked this blood type against Carl Heine’s, and found that Heine’s blood was also B-positive. (full context)
Hooks asks Whitman whether he can say with certainty that the blood is Carl’s; he admits that he cannot, although he does say that the B-positive blood type is... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Nels directs Whitman’s attention to the second wound found on Carl’s corpse, on his hand. He asks whether it’s possible that the B-positive blood could’ve been... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Three fishermen testify that they’d seen Carl and Kabuo’s boats near one another on September 15, the night of Carl’s death, at... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...hit another man’s net. Thus, it would make sense that Leonard George would remember seeing Carl and Kabuo’s boats at Ship Channel Bank: he would’ve been on high alert so as... (full context)
Chapter 20
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...the afternoon of September 9, Kabuo had gone to the Heines’ house to talk to Carl Jr. about the land he’d recently purchased from Ole. Susan Marie let Kabuo into the... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
After the two men left, Susan Marie turned her thoughts to when she first met Carl. Her good looks could have guaranteed her any man on the island, but she’d wanted... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Susan Marie had stopped daydreaming, then, as Carl had returned alone. Kabuo wanted to buy the land, Carl revealed to his wife. He’d... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Carl told Susan Marie that he should just sell the land to Kabuo, as he knew... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Susan Marie then reminded Carl of his childhood friendship with Kabuo. Carl said that the friendship was of the past,... (full context)
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
After Carl’s passing, Susan Marie reflected again on her marriage. She considered again how largely sex had... (full context)
Chapter 21
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...directs his attention to the matter at hand. He asks Susan Marie about the conversation Carl had with Kabuo on September 9. She admits that she has “no firsthand knowledge of... (full context)
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
When Carl had come back from talking to Kabuo, Susan Marie agrees, he didn’t want to discuss... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
When Nels suggests that Carl had made Kabuo hopeful that he would seriously entertain selling him back the land, Susan... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...Susan Marie says she “suppose[s]” that Kabuo had seemed to be a childhood acquaintance of Carl’s. Nels also brings up the “dirty looks” that Kabuo “is supposed to have aimed at... (full context)
Chapter 23
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
...15 and 16. In a series of transmission logs, Ishmael discovers that, the night/morning of Carl’s death, a large ship called the S.S. West Corona had passed, off course, through the... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Ishmael pieces together the meaning of these logs: “that on the night Carl Heine had drowned, stopping his watch at 1:47, a freighter plowed through Ship Channel Bank... (full context)
Chapter 25
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
...her husband had returned home with bad news: Ole had already sold the land to Carl Heine. (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...Kabuo hadn’t been upset, recalls Hatsue; rather, he’d been hopeful. Kabuo decided to talk to Carl about the land. On September 9, Kabuo went to the Heines’ house to talk with... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
...his hopes up about buying back the land. But Kabuo had maintained that “Etta and Carl [were] two different people,” relates Hatsue. Because Carl had been Kabuo’s friend, Kabuo had reasoned,... (full context)
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Hatsue tells Nels that she and Kabuo had waited, because “the next move was Carl’s.” Kabuo thought it “dishonorable” to approach Carl before he’d had the chance to respond on... (full context)
Chapter 26
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...turn to cross-examine Hatsue. He finds Hatsue’s “story” about Kabuo’s excitement towards the news that Carl had decided to sell him the seven acres “terribly interesting.” Hooks tries to paint Kabuo’s... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...because it seemed in poor taste to tell people so soon after they’d learned of Carl’s death; what’s more, the accident changed things. She explains that their circumstances were no longer... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Hooks twists Hatsue’s words, suggesting that Carl’s death had been what prevented the couple from sharing the news. Hatsue asserts that it... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Hooks asks Hatsue why the couple hadn’t gone to the police when they learned of Carl’s death—did they think it might be useful for authorities to know about Carl’s battery dying,... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...Josiah insists that this would an unfeasible—if not impossible—method of attacking or killing another man. Carl’s large size, in particular, would make this method of attack extremely unlikely. (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Nels shifts focus to Carl’s battery troubles. Gillanders says it would be unlikely for a gill-netter to carry a spare... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Gillanders thinks that Hatsue’s story—that Carl’s batteries had died, and that Kabuo had given him his spare—must be true. If Carl’s... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Gillanders adds that the dangerous location of Carl’s boat—in the middle of the Ship Channel Bank—would have made it especially critical that Carl... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...proposed for Gillanders and that Gillanders had accepted as possible (that Kabuo had successfully boarded Carl’s ship on the open sea and loaned him a battery) by posing a different hypothetical... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
“Hooks tells Gillanders to consider another possibility: that Kabuo wants to murder Carl; that Kabuo follows Carl out to sea, so as to know where Carl’s boat is,... (full context)
Chapter 27
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...months before, he lied: he failed to disclose the fact that he’d seen and helped Carl Heine the night Carl was last seen alive. (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...[he was] concerned about.” Nels cited the evidence that the blood on the gaff matched Carl’s blood type, as well as the mooring lines found on Carl’s boat, and waited for... (full context)
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
...voice call out before him: “I’m dead in the water, drifting.” The voice belonged to Carl Heine. Kabuo stumbled upon Carl, “his batteries dead, adrift at midnight, in need of another... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Kabuo told Carl he had two batteries. Carl responded that his boat ran D-8s. Kabuo’s boat ran D-6s,... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Kabuo reflected on how long he’d known Carl. He knew that Carl avoided speaking whenever possible. Kabuo remembered, in particular, a moment from... (full context)
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Kabuo lifted one of his batteries from his battery well. He carried it to Carl. Carl said they could make it fit. Kabuo retrieved his gaff—they could use it to... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
Before Kabuo could depart, Carl brought up the subject of the seven acres. He asked Kabuo what he’d pay for... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
But Carl stopped joking and apologized for the big mess of the land, his mother, and the... (full context)
Chapter 28
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...with this story from the start. Kabuo tries to explain that he hadn’t heard about Carl’s death on September 16 until 1 p.m., and that, after that, it was only a... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Kabuo pauses before responding that the truth is that he helped Carl, as he just stated in his testimony. Hooks listens and then asks if Kabuo is... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...why it was that Kabuo still had two batteries in his boat after he’d loaned Carl one; Kabuo had mentioned nothing about purchasing an extra battery at the store that day,... (full context)
Chapter 29
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Alvin Hooks gives his closing statements. He claims Kabuo murdered Carl in cold blood. He emphasizes how much motive Kabuo would’ve had to murder Carl, citing... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...carefully Kabuo  orchestrated the event. Enraged by Ole’s decision to sell the strawberry fields to Carl, Kabuo decided to take matters into his own hands. He followed Carl’s boat to the... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...soberly as he [could].” He outlines how Kabuo had gone to Ole Jurgensen and then Carl Heine about the land; how then fate had brought the two boats together at Ship... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...planned to commit murder. There were no witnesses to attest to Kabuo’s mental state before Carl’s death. Above all, Nels emphasizes that the prosecution hadn’t proved Kabuo’s guilt “beyond a reasonable... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...that “perhaps there is such a thing as fate.” It might’ve been fate that led Carl and Kabuo to come together under such a series of coincidences, and fate, ultimately, that... (full context)
Chapter 32
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...that Art Moran, in his testimony, had remarked on a spilled cup of coffee on Carl’s cabin floor. Hatsue believes this is proof that “something” must have knocked both the coffee... (full context)
The Psychological Impact of War  Theme Icon
...evidence that could help her husband’s case: the lantern. When Kabuo testified, he’d mentioned that Carl had a lantern hung from his ship’s mast, as his batteries had died and he... (full context)
Duty vs. Desire Theme Icon
...time. Ishmael and Hatsue drive in Ishmael’s DeSoto. Ishmael thinks if they can go to Carl’s boat first, then they can go to the courthouse with all their new evidence (Milholland’s... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...up. Moran says they’re going to go down to Beason’s Cannery dock to look at Carl’s boat. Moran makes Hatsue get breakfast while the men go down to the docks to... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
The men arrive at Carl’s boat, the Susan Marie. There is no lantern on the mast. They look in Carl’s... (full context)
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Abel shines a light where Carl would’ve hung the lantern. There are “cut lashings of net twine visible there, loose ends... (full context)
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
...of what had happened.” He sees the Susan Marie, dead in the water. He sees Carl light and hang his lantern from the mast. He sees Kabuo’s boat, the Islander, approach... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Facts vs. Truth Theme Icon
Ishmael wonders whether Kabuo had initially found it “a fortuitous thing” to encounter Carl on the sea, since helping Carl might mean that Kazuo’s goal of owning and working... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...scene that unfolded the night of September 15: as Kabuo, having just parted ways with Carl, was occupied by happy thoughts of the strawberry farm and his family’s future, The S.S.... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
Over the radio, Carl heard the Corona decide, suddenly, to switch course—it would now plow right through Ship Channel... (full context)
Chance vs. Choice Theme Icon
...office, Ishmael thinks about the fog and the series of fateful events that led to Carl and Kabuo’s meeting, and to Carl’s eventual death. (full context)