Snow Falling on Cedars

by

David Guterson

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Kabuo Miyamoto is a fisherman and the husband of Hatsue Miyamoto. Kabuo is accused of the murder of Carl Heine, another local fisherman. Kabuo struggles with anger and the power of fate throughout the novel. He killed four German soldiers during WWII, and he feels that the unfair murder trial is fate’s way of punishing him for these forced acts of violence. And, because his great-grandfather was a samurai, Kabuo spends much of the novel believing that he, too, is destined to be violent and angry. Kabuo often feels that he has no ability to influence of the course of his life. Because of this resignation, Kabuo maintains an unreadable demeanor. He initially believes this will orient the jury in his favor—that his calm face reflects a soul that is focused and moral. But Kabuo receives only prejudiced interpretations of his demeanor from the jury, whose racism is a product of their personal bigotries, as well as a widespread racist perception of individuals of Japanese descent during WWII. Kabuo loves his wife, Hatsue, and their two children, but he has been cold and alienated since coming back from the war. His alienations stems from psychological trauma he incurred as a soldier in WWII, but he also harbors resentment toward the Heine family for selling the strawberry field acreage his father had bought under the table from Carl Heine, Sr. before the war.

Kabuo Miyamoto Quotes in Snow Falling on Cedars

The Snow Falling on Cedars quotes below are all either spoken by Kabuo Miyamoto or refer to Kabuo Miyamoto. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism and Prejudice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of Snow Falling on Cedars published in 1995.
Chapter 2 Quotes

All in all, Art decided, Carl Heine was a good man. He was silent, yes, and grave like his mother, but the war had a part in that, Art realized. Carl rarely laughed, but he did not seem, to Art’s way of thinking, unhappy or dissatisfied.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr., Art Moran
Page Number: 16
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

Thus on San Piedro the silent-toiling, autonomous gill-netter became the collective image of the good man. He who was too gregarious, who spoke too much and too ardently desired the company of others, their conversation and their laughter, did not have what life required.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr., Art Moran
Page Number: 38-39
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

What could he say to people on San Piedro to explain the coldness he projected? The world was unreal, a nuisance that prevented him from focusing on the memory of that boy, on the flies in a cloud over his astonished face […] the sound of gunfire from the hillside to the east—he’d left there, and then he hadn’t left. […] It had seemed to Kabuo that his detachment from this world was somehow self-explanatory, that the judge, the jurors, and the people in the gallery would recognize the face of a war veteran […]. Now, looking at himself, scrutinizing his face, he saw that he appeared defiant instead.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:

Sitting where he sat now, accused of the murder of Carl Heine, it seemed to him he’d found the suffering place he’d fantasized and desired. For Kabuo Miyamoto was suffering in his cell from the fear of his imminent judgment. Perhaps it was now his fate to pay for the lives he had taken in anger.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 169
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

Art Moran looked into the Jap’s eyes to see if he could discern the truth there. But they were hard eyes set in a proud, still face, and there was nothing to be read in them either way. They were the eyes of a man with concealed emotions, the eyes of a man hiding something. “You’re under arrest,” repeated Art Moran, “in connection with the death of Carl Heine.”

Related Characters: Art Moran (speaker), Kabuo Miyamoto, Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 269
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

“I’m not talking about the whole universe,” cut in Hatsue. “I’m talking about people—the sheriff, that prosecutor, the judge, you. People who can do things because they run newspapers or arrest people or convict them or decide about their lives. People don’t have to be unfair, do they? That isn’t just part of things, when people are unfair to somebody.”

Related Symbols: Snow
Page Number: 326
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 24 Quotes

“The defense hasn’t made its case yet, but you’re all ready to convict. You’ve got the prosecutor’s set of facts, but that might not be the whole story—it never is, Ishmael. And besides, really, facts are so cold, so horribly cold—can we defend on facts by themselves?”

“What else do we have?” replied Ishmael. “Everything else is ambiguous. Everything else is emotions and hunches. At least the facts you can cling to; the emotions just float away.”

Related Characters: Ishmael Chambers (speaker), Helen Chambers (speaker), Kabuo Miyamoto
Page Number: 345
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 26 Quotes

“I’m not interpreting or misinterpreting,” Alvin Hooks cut in. “I merely want to know what the facts are—we all want to know what the facts are, Mrs. Miyamoto, that’s what we’re doing here.”

Related Symbols: The Courtroom
Page Number: 371
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 27 Quotes

“I’m an American,” Kabuo cut in. “Just like you or anybody. Am I calling you a Nazi, you big Nazi bastard? I killed men who looked just like you—pig-fed German bastards. I’ve got blood on my soul, Carl, and it doesn’t wash off very easily. So don’t you talk to me about Japs, you big Nazi son of a bitch.”

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto (speaker), Carl Heine, Jr.
Page Number: 404
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 28 Quotes

The citizens in the gallery were reminded of photographs they had seen of Japanese soldiers. The man before them was noble in appearance, and the shadows played across the planes of his face in a way that made their angles harden […]. He was, they decided, not like them at all, and the detached and aloof manner in which he watched the snowfall made this palpable and self-evident.

Related Characters: Kabuo Miyamoto, Alvin Hooks
Related Symbols: Snow, The Courtroom
Page Number: 412
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 29 Quotes

“The storm,” said the judge, “is beyond our control, but the outcome of this trial is not. The outcome of this trial is up to you now. You may adjourn and begin your deliberations.”

Related Characters: Judge Llewellyn Fielding (speaker), Kabuo Miyamoto
Related Symbols: Snow, The Courtroom
Page Number: 422
Explanation and Analysis:

“There are things in this universe that we cannot control, and then there are the things we can. Your task as you deliberate together on these proceedings is to ensure that you do nothing to yield to a universe in which things go awry by happenstance. Let fate, coincidence, and accident conspire; human beings must act on reason.”

Related Characters: Nels Gudmundsson (speaker), Kabuo Miyamoto
Related Symbols: Snow, The Courtroom
Page Number: 418
Explanation and Analysis:
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Snow Falling on Cedars PDF

Kabuo Miyamoto Character Timeline in Snow Falling on Cedars

The timeline below shows where the character Kabuo Miyamoto appears in Snow Falling on Cedars. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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The novel opens in a courtroom, which is filled to capacity. Kabuo Miyamoto, appearing detached and unreadable, sits at the defendant’s table. While some people think his... (full context)
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...a lost era of seagoing optimism.” Beyond this, the land is covered in cedar trees. Kabuo watches the snow fall and recalls that during the 77 days he’d been imprisoned—late September... (full context)
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...war. Ishmael has only one arm, having lost the other during the war. Ishmael knows Kabuo from high school. (full context)
Chapter 2
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...night, Moran tossed and turned all night, anguishing over his role as a witness in Kabuo’s trial. (full context)
Chapter 3
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Back in the courtroom, Nels Gudmundsson, Kabuo’s defense attorney, cross-examines Art Moran. Nels is 79 years old, “with a slow and deliberate... (full context)
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...uncertainty at all” about the matter. Art responds that yes, it’s possible, “but not likely.” Kabuo watches Nels silently. (full context)
Chapter 4
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...on Ship Channel Bank, and the fishermen recalling seeing several others, among them the Islander, Kabuo Miyamoto’s ship. When they were through with the fishermen, Art Moran and Ishmael left the... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...in the courtroom, the trial’s morning recess is underway. Hatsue Miyamoto talks to her husband, Kabuo. Hatsue has visited her husband each afternoon since his arrest. Hatsue is 31 years old... (full context)
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Back in the courtroom, Hatsue talks to her husband. She remarks on the snow. Kabuo notes that it reminds him of Manzanar, as snow usually does. The couple had been... (full context)
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...night together. As the snow fell outside on their wedding night, the couple made love. Kabuo smelled like earth to Hatsue, and it was then that realized she wanted a life... (full context)
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Back in the courtroom, Hatsue observes that Kabuo has grown distant since he returned from fighting in the war, which he’d enlisted for... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Back in the courtroom, Ishmael watches Hatsue talk to Kabuo. He forces himself to look away. When the court returns after the recess, it’s Carl... (full context)
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...weren’t particularly lucrative, but they supported the family for years. Etta reveals that she knows Kabuo Miyamoto because his family picked in their fields back before the war. She recalls that... (full context)
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...urges Hooks to move forward with Etta’s testimony. Through Etta’s testimony, the court learns that Kabuo was the Miyamotos’ first child: he was 12 in 1934. The Miyamotos’ thinking behind the... (full context)
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...from their seven acres. When Carl Jr. returned home, he saw Zenhichi and asked after Kabuo, with whom he was friendly. After Carl Jr. left to meet up with Kabuo, Zenhichi... (full context)
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...with her testimony, Etta recalls that Carl Jr. had returned later with fishing rod that Kabuo had loaned him. Without hesitation, Etta had instructed Carl to “take the fishing rod back... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...heard from the Miyamotos after this, and she reveals that she did, in July, 1945. Kabuo had come to her door inquiring after the property. “Well,” responded Etta, “I told you... (full context)
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Kabuo replied that he had talked to Ole, who had no idea that Carl Sr. had... (full context)
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...this confrontation, Etta recalls in her testimony, there was no further communication between her and Kabuo, except “dirty looks.” Etta tells the court that Kabuo gives her angry looks any time... (full context)
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...to ask what Etta saw in her son that would suggest he was afraid of Kabuo. Etta agrees that the term “family feud” could describe the conflict between the two men,... (full context)
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...that yes, it was clear; Ole hadn’t been aware of the Miyamotos’ seven acres until Kabuo came to see him in the summer of 1945, claiming that “Mrs. Heine robbed him,... (full context)
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Kabuo told Ole he wanted his family’s seven acres back, but Ole, had been unwilling to... (full context)
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Later the same day, Ole remembers, Kabuo came to his house to inquire after the land. Ole remembered that Kabuo had worked... (full context)
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...day to take down the “For Sale” sign on the land, and Ole told him Kabuo had been by, and explained “the way the politeness had gone out of” Kabuo’s face... (full context)
Chapter 11
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Kabuo eats in his jail cell after the trial’s noon recess. The room is small and... (full context)
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In his jail cell, Kabuo continues to look at his reflection. He wonders how he could begin to explain to... (full context)
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Kabuo knows that his face, so much more than his testimony and the testimonies of others,... (full context)
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Kabuo likes Nels. He remembers the first time they met in his jail cell. Kabuo right... (full context)
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Kabuo recalls that Nels repeated his point that they’d worry about innocence later. Then, he pulled... (full context)
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Now, in his jail cell, Kabuo resumes eating his lunch. He daydreams about wandering through the woods of San Piedro. Kabuo... (full context)
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Kabuo continues to think about Hatsue. He remembers seeing her before they’d been married, when they... (full context)
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Kabuo then remembers their budding romance in Manzanar. One night, after a long day of work... (full context)
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Kabuo continues to reminisce about Hatsue. He recalls her unhappy reaction when he told her he’d... (full context)
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In his jail cell, Kabuo’s thoughts turn to his father and his father’s katana, which he’d brought to the United... (full context)
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His father had also buried a photograph of Kabuo, taken at the San Piedro Japanese Community Center. In the photograph, Kabuo was dressed in... (full context)
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Kabuo remembers how his father had told him about his family’s samurai past. Kabuo’s great-grandfather had... (full context)
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Kabuo recalls how Zenhichi told him that although it was in his blood to be a... (full context)
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At present, as he sits in his jail cell, Kabuo feels trapped by his perception that his family’s warrior past has sealed his fate. Kabuo... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Outside Kabuo’s jail cell, it continues to snow. Ishmael Chambers walks outside and takes in the forces... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Before Fujiko confronts her daughter, a group of boys from the island, including Kabuo, come by the make repairs and improvements on the Imadas’ sorry excuse for a home.... (full context)
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Kabuo brings the drawers he made for the family’s room, and Fujiko invites him to stay.... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...pieces of mooring line rope that Art had collected as evidence. Exhibit A is from Kabuo’s boat, explains Art. It is old and matches the rest of Kabuo’s lines—except for one,... (full context)
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...which was found on Carl’s boat, isn’t like these fancy, new ropes. It’s more like Kabuo’s worn out ropes. This suggests that, at some point, Kabuo had been “tied up to... (full context)
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...with Carl’s relatives, who’d brought Art up to speed on Carl’s supposed bad blood with Kabuo Miyamoto. Feeling that the land feud was a reasonable lead to follow, Art had resigned... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...Heine’s body, Art Moran went to Judge Lew Fielding to obtain a warrant to search Kabuo’s boat. Fielding seemed surprised to hear Moran mention Kabuo, so Art explained the five main... (full context)
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...kendo infliction as an “off-the-cuff statement.” He hadn’t been convinced that this detail really incriminated Kabuo. As far as Etta was concerned, Fielding found her hatefulness to be problematic. (full context)
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...and then asked for a warrant for him to sign. Fielding allowed Art to search Kabuo’s boat, but not his home. (full context)
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Later that night, Kabuo Miyamoto made his way toward his boat, the Islander, which sat in the south dock.... (full context)
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Kabuo, nonetheless, went about prepping his boat for a night of fishing. He opened up his... (full context)
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Suddenly, Kabuo saw a seagull “perched arrogantly on the port gunnel” of his boat. It looked like... (full context)
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At this very moment, Art Moran and Abel Martinson appeared before Kabuo’s boat. Art instructed Kabuo to turn of the Islander’s power. Moran informed Kabuo that he... (full context)
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...the butt end—not where fish are pierced, but where the user’s hand would normally rest. Kabuo claimed that this sometimes happened—that fish blood got on one’s hands and was then transferred... (full context)
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Moran said his warrant allowed him to send the gaff in for testing. Kabuo insisted again on his innocence. Moran placed Kabuo under arrest, noting to himself that the... (full context)
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Art faced Kabuo, “look[ing] into the Jap’s still eyes to see if he could discern the truth there,”... (full context)
Chapter 19
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It’s now December 7, the morning of the second day of Kabuo’s trial. It’s freezing and snowing outside, but the courtroom is warm. Alvin Hooks calls Dr.... (full context)
...cannot, although he does say that the B-positive blood type is somewhat rare. In contrast, Kabuo’s blood type is O-negative. Thus, the blood on the gaff was neither animal blood nor... (full context)
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...scalp. Nels speculates that this is odd, as the prosecution’s theory seems to be that Kabuo hit Carl over the head with the gaff. (full context)
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Three fishermen testify that they’d seen Carl and Kabuo’s boats near one another on September 15, the night of Carl’s death, at Ship Channel... (full context)
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...man’s net. Thus, it would make sense that Leonard George would remember seeing Carl and Kabuo’s boats at Ship Channel Bank: he would’ve been on high alert so as not to... (full context)
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...Sergeant Victor Maples, who trains combat troops, to the stand. He testifies that he remembers Kabuo due to the kendo expertise he demonstrated during training. Kabuo was so skilled that, in... (full context)
Chapter 20
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On the afternoon of September 9, Kabuo had gone to the Heines’ house to talk to Carl Jr. about the land he’d... (full context)
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Susan Marie had stopped daydreaming, then, as Carl had returned alone. Kabuo wanted to buy the land, Carl revealed to his wife. He’d responded to Kabuo’s request... (full context)
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Carl told Susan Marie that he should just sell the land to Kabuo, as he knew that Susan Marie was never keen on moving back to work the... (full context)
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Susan Marie then reminded Carl of his childhood friendship with Kabuo. Carl said that the friendship was of the past, “Before the war came along.” One... (full context)
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The couple didn’t talk about Kabuo again after this. Susan Marie knew that was unacceptable “to open up her husband’s wounds... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...to the matter at hand. He asks Susan Marie about the conversation Carl had with Kabuo on September 9. She admits that she has “no firsthand knowledge of its content,” as... (full context)
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When Carl had come back from talking to Kabuo, Susan Marie agrees, he didn’t want to discuss their conversation. She also agrees that Carl... (full context)
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When Nels suggests that Carl had made Kabuo hopeful that he would seriously entertain selling him back the land, Susan Marie disagrees, though... (full context)
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Prompted by Nels, Susan Marie says she “suppose[s]” that Kabuo had seemed to be a childhood acquaintance of Carl’s. Nels also brings up the “dirty... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...need to document such a big storm, though he thinks that the storm shouldn’t “overshadow” Kabuo’s trial. (full context)
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Finally, in the back of Ishmael’s car, Hatsue addresses Ishmael: “Kabuo’s trial, is unfair […].” She urges Ishmael to write about the unfairness in the paper.... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...records. His thoughts of Hatsue have made him wonder if, perhaps, there’s evidence pertaining to Kabuo’s trial present among all the records and logs. He abandons his research for the storm... (full context)
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...a small gill-netting boat and toss even a big man overboard.” These logs prove that Kabuo couldn’t have murdered Carl. (full context)
Chapter 24
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...they get to discussing the trial. Helen considers it a “travesty” that they’ve likely arrested Kabuo because of his Japanese ancestry. She asks Ishmael for his opinion. Ishmael becomes cold and... (full context)
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Ishmael cites Kabuo’s “unmovable and stolid” posture in court, and how Kabuo seems not to care that he... (full context)
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Helen challenges her son. Didn’t Kabuo serve in the United States military, just as Ishmael did? Ishmael stubbornly refutes this, dismissing... (full context)
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...to make [Hatsue] beholden to him.” With Hatsue “beholden” to Ishmael, and with her husband, Kabuo, in jail, perhaps the star-crossed couple can finally reunite, Ishmael reasons. (full context)
Chapter 25
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...a geisha. Hatsue isn’t calm on the inside, though. She’s not confident in speaking for Kabuo, who “[is] a mystery to her, and [has] been ever since he’d returned from his... (full context)
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Hatsue remembers how Kabuo had been cold, aloof, and suffered from frequent “disturbing dreams.” Hatsue thought that having children... (full context)
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The land predicament was a huge problem for Kabuo. Half a year after war’s end, Hatsue, pregnant, woke to find Kabuo gone. Eventually, Kabuo... (full context)
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After that, they’d saved their money. Kabuo fished to support his family and save up money to buy back the strawberry field,... (full context)
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...Nels begins to question her as to whether it would be “fair” to propose that Kabuo was interested in buying back his family’s land. Yes, Hatsue answers; he’d been very interested.... (full context)
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But Kabuo hadn’t been upset, recalls Hatsue; rather, he’d been hopeful. Kabuo decided to talk to Carl... (full context)
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Still, Nels reminds Hatsue, there was the issue of Etta Heine: Kabuo and Etta weren’t on good terms. Hatsue agrees; in fact, she’d cautioned Kabuo to be... (full context)
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Hatsue tells Nels that she and Kabuo had waited, because “the next move was Carl’s.” Kabuo thought it “dishonorable” to approach Carl... (full context)
Chapter 26
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It’s Alvin Hooks’s turn to cross-examine Hatsue. He finds Hatsue’s “story” about Kabuo’s excitement towards the news that Carl had decided to sell him the seven acres “terribly... (full context)
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...think it might be useful for authorities to know about Carl’s battery dying, and about Kabuo helping him? Hatsue says they’d considered coming forward, but ultimately decided not to, because the... (full context)
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...appear suspect. She argues that there wasn’t time to come forward before Sheriff Moran arrested Kabuo. Hooks continues to act flabbergasted at the Miyamotos’ actions in an effort to get Hatsue... (full context)
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Gillanders thinks that Hatsue’s story—that Carl’s batteries had died, and that Kabuo had given him his spare—must be true. If Carl’s batteries were both dead, he wouldn’t... (full context)
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...after all, would require no battery. Finally, Nels expresses how unlikely it would be for Kabuo to be able to premeditate running into Carl, in such a compromised position, under such... (full context)
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...“hypothetical” situation Nels had proposed for Gillanders and that Gillanders had accepted as possible (that Kabuo had successfully boarded Carl’s ship on the open sea and loaned him a battery) by... (full context)
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“Hooks tells Gillanders to consider another possibility: that Kabuo wants to murder Carl; that Kabuo follows Carl out to sea, so as to know... (full context)
Chapter 27
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The snowstorm continues outside the courtroom, beating against the windows. Kabuo hasn’t been able to sense the snow from his windowless jail cell, though. In his... (full context)
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Kabuo recalls how, at first, Nels had taken Kabuo’s statement as the truth. But when he... (full context)
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Kabuo recalls that Nels had returned the next day with the sheriff’s report. He told Kabuo... (full context)
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When Kabuo remained silent, Nels seemed to sense Kabuo’s motivations for silence: “You figure because you’re from... (full context)
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Kabuo recalls the night of September 15: he checked his boat’s engine. He was determined to... (full context)
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Kabuo waited and listened to the radio. He heard the other gill-netters complain about the thickness... (full context)
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Kabuo drifted through the fog, laying on his fog horn from time to time in order... (full context)
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Kabuo told Carl he had two batteries. Carl responded that his boat ran D-8s. Kabuo’s boat... (full context)
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Kabuo reflected on how long he’d known Carl. He knew that Carl avoided speaking whenever possible.... (full context)
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Kabuo lifted one of his batteries from his battery well. He carried it to Carl. Carl... (full context)
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Before Kabuo could depart, Carl brought up the subject of the seven acres. He asked Kabuo what... (full context)
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...was out at sea, fighting you goddamn Jap sons a—” he began, in defense. But Kabuo interrupted him. “I’m an American,” he told Carl. Besides, he reminded him, Carl was of... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Back in the courtroom, Kabuo finishes relaying his testimony to Hooks. Hooks picks at his nails and, exasperatedly, asks Kabuo... (full context)
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Kabuo again reinforces what a tricky situation he was in. Hooks asks Kabuo if he was... (full context)
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Kabuo pauses before responding that the truth is that he helped Carl, as he just stated... (full context)
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Hooks directs his testimony at Moran’s search of Kabuo’s boat, drawing attention to the details of the search. Specifically, he cites the fact that... (full context)
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Kabuo pauses, and responds that he simply had a spare battery in his shed. He’d brought... (full context)
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But Hooks seems satisfied, and says he has no more questions for Kabuo. When Kabuo’s questioning is over, he stands up and makes sure that everyone sees that... (full context)
Chapter 29
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Alvin Hooks gives his closing statements. He claims Kabuo murdered Carl in cold blood. He emphasizes how much motive Kabuo would’ve had to murder... (full context)
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...goes through the night of the murder, step by step, emphasizing how patiently and carefully Kabuo  orchestrated the event. Enraged by Ole’s decision to sell the strawberry fields to Carl, Kabuo... (full context)
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...Nels delivers his statement “in measured tones, as soberly as he [could].” He outlines how Kabuo had gone to Ole Jurgensen and then Carl Heine about the land; how then fate... (full context)
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Nels emphasizes that the prosecution hasn’t provided any evidence that Kabuo] planned to commit murder. There were no witnesses to attest to Kabuo’s mental state before... (full context)
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...there is such a thing as fate.” It might’ve been fate that led Carl and Kabuo to come together under such a series of coincidences, and fate, ultimately, that led “an... (full context)
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...ends his statement by emphasizing the weight and power of the jury’s ability to choose Kabuo’s fate. (full context)
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...and he thinks he didn’t handle it well. He’s not comfortable with the fact that Kabuo’s life is on the line. (full context)
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...dismisses the jury to make their deliberations, he emphasizes that they must be certain that Kabuo is guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt” if they are to convict him. They must also... (full context)
Chapter 30
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...3:00 p.m., and the jury leaves the courtroom to begin their deliberations. Hatsue goes to Kabuo and tells him that he’ll be free: the jury will do the right thing. Kabuo... (full context)
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...his coat and again feels Milholland’s coast guard’s log. Hatsue again tells Ishmael how unfair Kabuo’s trial was. She tells Ishmael he needs to write about it “in [Arthur’s] newspaper.” Ishmael... (full context)
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...the midst of their deliberations. All but one of the twelve jurors have decided that Kabuo is guilty. Alexander Van Ness, the sole unconvinced member, stubbornly holds his ground. He wants... (full context)
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...Harold Jensen. Others believe the physical evidence found on the boats is damning. Others cite Kabuo’s supposedly guilty demeanor; they think he’s a liar. “Then […] what’s he hiding?” asks Van... (full context)
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...are interesting, but not applicable to the specific matter at hand—they don’t relate to whether Kabuo should hang or go free. (full context)
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...hypothetical situations to distinguish between reasonable and unreasonable doubt. Many still just don’t believe in Kabuo, personally. Alex Van Ness maintains that he is open to hearing what the other members... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...thought about another piece of evidence that could help her husband’s case: the lantern. When Kabuo testified, he’d mentioned that Carl had a lantern hung from his ship’s mast, as his... (full context)
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...from Carl’s cut hand. This suggests that Carl removed the lantern after he’d been with Kabuo and after he’d cut his hand on Kabuo’s gaff. The men turn to the “port... (full context)
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...with Judge Fielding. At 10:00 a.m., Fielding dismisses the jury and dismisses the charges against Kabuo. Ishmael returns to his newspaper office to write a story about the trial. He “trie[s]... (full context)
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Ishmael wonders whether Kabuo had initially found it “a fortuitous thing” to encounter Carl on the sea, since helping... (full context)
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Ishmael imagines the scene that unfolded the night of September 15: as Kabuo, having just parted ways with Carl, was occupied by happy thoughts of the strawberry farm... (full context)
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...thinks about the fog and the series of fateful events that led to Carl and Kabuo’s meeting, and to Carl’s eventual death. (full context)