Sons and Lovers

by

D. H. Lawrence

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Annie Morel Character Analysis

Annie Morel is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morel and the sister of William, Paul and Arthur. She is a practical girl and grows into a mature and sensible young woman. Annie takes a job as a schoolteacher and marries a good-natured young man called Leonard, who has a good position at work and of whom the family are fond. Annie sides with Mrs. Morel against Miriam, Paul’s girlfriend, whom both the women dislike. Annie, like Mrs. Morel, feels that Miriam is overly spiritual and refined and is a bad influence on Paul. Annie feels that Miriam takes all his attention away from the family, where his real loyalties should rest, and she blames Miriam for distracting Paul when Mrs. Morel first becomes ill. Annie helps Paul care for Mrs. Morel towards the end of the novel, when Mrs. Morel is dying. Annie is close to her mother and feels that, if she had been at home during the early stages of Mrs. Morel’s illness, her mother would have confided in her and she could have helped her get proper treatment. However, Annie’s relationship with Mrs. Morel does not have the intensity of the relationships between Mrs. Morel and William and Paul. By the time of Mrs. Morel’s death, Annie is worn out with her care and the strain of constantly seeing her mother in pain and is relieved when Paul decides to poison his mother to end her suffering.

Annie Morel Quotes in Sons and Lovers

The Sons and Lovers quotes below are all either spoken by Annie Morel or refer to Annie Morel. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of Sons and Lovers published in 2006.
Chapter 3 Quotes

It seemed queer to the children to see their mother, who was always busy about the house, sitting writing in her rapid fashion, thinking, referring to books, and writing again. They felt for her on such occasions the deepest respect. But they loved the ‘Guild.’ It was the only thing to which they did not grudge their mother: and that partly because she enjoyed it, partly because of the treats they derived from it. The guild was called by some hostile husbands, who found their wives getting too independent, the “clatfart” shop: that is, the gossip shop. It is true, from off the basis of the guild, the women could look at their homes, at the conditions of their own lives, and find fault.

Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

He watched with wicked satisfaction the drops of wax melt off the broken forehead of Arabella, and drop like sweat into the flame. So long as the stupid big doll burned, he rejoiced in silence. At the end, he poked among the embers with a stick, fished out the arms and legs, all blackened, and smashed them under stones.

“That’s the sacrifice of Missis Arabella,” he said. “An’ I’m glad there’s nothing left of her.”

Which disturbed Annie inwardly, although she could say nothing. He seemed to hate the doll so intensely, because he had broken it.

Related Characters: Paul Morel (speaker), Annie Morel
Page Number: 83
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Sons and Lovers LitChart as a printable PDF.
Sons and Lovers PDF

Annie Morel Character Timeline in Sons and Lovers

The timeline below shows where the character Annie Morel appears in Sons and Lovers. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
...worries that Mr. Morel will “make a holiday” of it, but the children, William and Annie, are extremely excited. (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
...after lunch, as soon as the “wakes” are set up. Mrs. Morel follows later with Annie, but she is unsettled by the noise and bustle of the fair. William is delighted... (full context)
Chapter 2 
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...back from school, he is upset to find that his father has left. He and Annie begin to cry, and Mrs. Morel tiredly berates them. As the evening wears on, Mrs.... (full context)
Chapter 4
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...like his mother. As a small boy, he is very close to his older sister, Annie, and follows her around, joining in her games. Annie’s favorite toy is a doll with... (full context)
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
Once William and Annie have both found jobs, it becomes Paul’s responsibility to go to the public house and... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
On Friday nights, Annie and Arthur go out with their friends, but Paul prefers to stay in and wait... (full context)
Chapter 6
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...the chance arises, he transfers to a boarding school and moves out of the house. Annie has already left, and has a job as a teacher, so Mrs. Morel finds that... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
...Louisa complains that she has lost her gloves and seems slightly amused by William’s family. Annie is so intimidated by Louisa that she acts like “the maid” and offers to help... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...always up early. When she finally does come down, William is annoyed that she treats Annie like a servant and that she is haughty and “glib” with his family. Louisa is... (full context)
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
...bed until they do. William eventually sends Louisa upstairs to the room she shares with Annie. He asks his mother irritably if she does not trust them and Mrs. Morel confirms... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...He finds that she still treats his family like her servants (one day, she asks Annie to wash her clothes for her, even though she has plenty of spares) and he... (full context)
Chapter 7
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
...up. She says that he and Miriam are too young to “court.” Paul complains that Annie has a boyfriend, but Mrs. Morel says that she trusts Annie more than she trusts... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
...walk to Hemlock Stone with Miriam and some of his friends. Miriam’s brother Geoffrey and Annie and Arthur go with them. That morning at breakfast, before they set out, Mrs. Morel... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
...change that comes over Paul and thinks that she changes his temperament for the worse. Annie agrees with her mother and Miriam’s distance from the family becomes more pronounced. Miriam does... (full context)
Chapter 8
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
At work, Paul is successful and well liked; he is promoted when Mr. Pappleworth leaves. Annie has moved back home and is engaged. On Friday nights, the miners divide up the... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
...and, half joking, insinuates that Mrs. Morel will blame Miriam if the loaves are ruined. Annie arrives home with her fiancé Leonard, who is kind to Miriam and does not join... (full context)
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
Women’s Work and Women’s Rights Theme Icon
Annie, Leonard, and Beatrice leave together, and Paul gives Miriam a French lesson. Every week, Miriam... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
...in the living room and Paul ignores her and assumes she is angry with him. Annie, however, tells Paul that his mother is ill. Annie found Mrs. Morel sitting in her... (full context)
Chapter 9
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
Annie and Leonard get married soon after this, and Arthur travels up for the wedding. Mrs.... (full context)
Chapter 11
Christianity, Propriety, and Physicality Theme Icon
One afternoon, as Paul watches Miriam sing while Annie plays the piano, he feels that she looks like a saint singing to God and... (full context)
Chapter 13
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...Blackpool with a friend and sends Mrs. Morel to Sheffield to have a holiday at Annie’s. (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
At the end of his time in Blackpool, Paul travels to Sheffield to join Annie and Mrs. Morel. He is in good spirits and looks forward to seeing them. When... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
Paul hopes that the tumor can be cured but, later, when he has dinner with Annie, she tells him that Mrs. Morel has a huge lump on her side. Annie discovered... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...cancer, but he must do an examination to be sure. When Paul arrives back at Annie’s, he carries Mrs. Morel downstairs and feeds her brandy. He is horrified and weeps over... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...says that he will cover these things. He returns to Sheffield that evening to help Annie care for Mrs. Morel. (full context)
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
 Nature and Industrialism Theme Icon
After staying for two months at Annie’s, Mrs. Morel travels home. Her health has not improved and has, instead, grown worse, and... (full context)
Chapter 14
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...hears about his mother’s illness, but Paul finds her touch a torment and pulls away. Annie lives at home with him to care for Mrs. Morel, and in the evenings they... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...drink, but she endures. As Christmas approaches and Mrs. Morel grows ever weaker, Paul and Annie feel that they cannot cope and that they will “go mad” with the strain. Annie... (full context)
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
A few nights later, Paul crushes the remaining morphia tablets into a glass of milk. Annie giggles hysterically when she sees this, and they take the drink to their mother. Mrs.... (full context)
Family, Psychology, and the Oedipus Complex Theme Icon
 Death, Grief, and Self-Destruction  Theme Icon
...and he feels that he cannot let her go. When the undertaker arrives, Paul and Annie watch over their mother and see that she is treated gently. Paul goes out that... (full context)