Stamped

by

Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

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In the 1950s and 1960s, Malcolm X was an influential Black civil rights activist and Nation of Islam minister. Although he was originally an assimilationist and then an anti-white separatist, he became an antiracist at the height of his popularity in the early 1960s. Today, he’s often viewed as a militant, radical alternative to Martin Luther King Jr., but the truth is far more complicated. Reynolds and Kendi explain that he advocated self-defense, not violence, and he and Dr. King agreed on most major issues at the end of their lives, when both became antiracists. Even after his assassination in 1965, Malcolm X inspired the Black Power movement and activists like Angela Davis.

Malcolm X Quotes in Stamped

The Stamped quotes below are all either spoken by Malcolm X or refer to Malcolm X. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Little, Brown Books for Young Readers edition of Stamped published in 2020.
Chapter 21 Quotes

[Malcolm X’s] ideological transformation, from assimilationist to anti-White separatist to antiracist, inspired millions. He argued that though White people weren’t born racist, America was built to make them that way. And that if they wanted to fight against it, they had to address it with the other racist White people around them. He critiqued Black assimilationists. Called them puppets, especially the “leaders” who had exploited their own people to climb the White ladder. Malcolm X stamped that he was for truth—not hate—truth and truth alone, no matter where it was coming from. His autobiography would become antiracist scripture. It would become one of the most important books in American history.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker), Malcolm X
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:
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Stamped PDF

Malcolm X Character Timeline in Stamped

The timeline below shows where the character Malcolm X appears in Stamped. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 20: Home Is Where the Hatred Is
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
...mistake of confusing antiracists with anti-white Black separatists, which lost him support. Around this time, Malcolm X was becoming popular as an antiracist alternative to Dr. King. (full context)
Chapter 21: When Death Comes
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
...University in Boston, she got to meet some of her idols, like James Baldwin and Malcolm X . She was studying abroad in France when she learned about the bombing. President Kennedy... (full context)
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
...by continuing to discriminate, while saying that discrimination didn’t exist. Black Americans and activists like Malcolm X questioned whether the bill would do anything. Angela Davis agreed. Why would a racist government... (full context)
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
...his reelection, President Johnson turned against civil rights groups like the SNCC, which started following Malcolm X by focusing on Black empowerment and pride. Then, Malcolm X was assassinated. Leaders like James... (full context)