Stamped

by

Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Stamped can help.
Antiracists are activists who fight to change racist policies and debunk racist ideas. They believe that all racial groups are fundamentally equal, so they strive to create a society that reflects this equality. But most people aren’t born antiracists. Instead, everyone has the choice to be an antiracist, assimilationist, or segregationist—and Kendi and Reynolds encourage their readers to be antiracists.

Antiracists Quotes in Stamped

The Stamped quotes below are all either spoken by Antiracists or refer to Antiracists. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Little, Brown Books for Young Readers edition of Stamped published in 2020.
Introduction Quotes

The segregationists and the assimilationists are challenged by antiracists. The antiracists say there is nothing wrong or right about Black people and everything wrong with racism. The antiracists say racism is the problem in need of changing, not Black people. The antiracists try to transform racism. The assimilationists try to transform Black people. The segregationists try to get away from Black people. These are the three distinct racial positions you will hear throughout Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You—the segregationists, the assimilationists, and the antiracists, and how they each have rationalized racial inequity.

Related Characters: Ibram X. Kendi (speaker)
Page Number: xiii
Explanation and Analysis:

The first step to building an antiracist America is acknowledging America's racist past. By acknowledging American racist past, we can acknowledge America's racist present. In acknowledging America's racist present, we can work toward building an antiracist America.

Related Characters: Ibram X. Kendi (speaker)
Page Number: xv
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 1 Quotes

Segregationists are haters. Like, real haters. People who hate you for not being like them. Assimilationists are people who like you, but only with quotation marks. Like…“like” you. Meaning, they “like” you because you’re like them. And then there are antiracists. They love you because you’re like you.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker)
Page Number: Chapter 1: The Story of the World’s First Racist 3
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

But not everyone was kissing Du Bois’s assimilationist feet. There was a resistant group of artists that emerged in 1926 who called themselves the Niggerati. They believed they should be able to make whatever they wanted to express themselves as whole humans without worrying about White acceptance. […] They wanted to function the same way as the blues women, like Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith, who sang about pain and sex and whatever else they wanted to. Even if the images of Blackness weren’t always positive. W. E. B. Du Bois and his supporters of uplift suasion and media suasion had a hard time accepting any narrative of Black people being less than perfect. Less than dignified. But the Niggerati were arguing that, if Black people couldn’t be shown as imperfect, they couldn’t be shown as human.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker), W. E. B. Du Bois
Page Number: 148
Explanation and Analysis:

It was 1933. Du Bois’s life as an assimilationist had finally started to vaporize. He just wanted Black people to be self-sufficient. To be Black. And for that to be enough. Here he argued that the American educational system was failing the country because it wouldn’t tell the truth about race in America, because it was too concerned with protecting and defending the White race. Ultimately, he was arguing what he’d been arguing in various different ways, and what Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Marcus Garvey, and many others before him had argued ad nauseam: that Black people were human.

Page Number: 150
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

King closed the day with what’s probably the most iconic speech of all time—“I Have a Dream.” But there was bad news. W. E. B. Du Bois had died in his sleep the previous day.

Indeed, a younger Du Bois had called for such a gathering, hoping it would persuade millions of White people to love the lowly souls of Black folk. And, yes, the older Du Bois had chosen another path—the antiracist path less traveled—toward forcing millions to accept the equal souls of Black folk. It was the path of civil disobedience that the young marchers […] had desired for the March on Washington, a path a young woman from Birmingham’s Dynamite Hill was already traveling and would never leave.

Page Number: 164-165
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

[Malcolm X’s] ideological transformation, from assimilationist to anti-White separatist to antiracist, inspired millions. He argued that though White people weren’t born racist, America was built to make them that way. And that if they wanted to fight against it, they had to address it with the other racist White people around them. He critiqued Black assimilationists. Called them puppets, especially the “leaders” who had exploited their own people to climb the White ladder. Malcolm X stamped that he was for truth—not hate—truth and truth alone, no matter where it was coming from. His autobiography would become antiracist scripture. It would become one of the most important books in American history.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker), Malcolm X
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 25 Quotes

Angela Davis. She was the conference’s closing speaker. She was certainly the nation’s most famous Black American woman academic. But, more important, over the course of her career, she had consistently defended Black women, including those Black women who even some Black women did not want to defend. She had been arguably America’s most antiracist voice over the past two decades, unwavering in her search for antiracist explanations when others took the easier and racist way of Black blame.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker), Angela Davis
Page Number: 216-217
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 28 Quotes

Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi founded #BlackLivesMatter as a direct response to racist backlash in the form of police brutality. From the minds and hearts of these three Black women—two of whom are queer—this declaration of love intuitively signified that in order to truly be antiracists, we must also oppose all the sexism, homophobia, colorism, ethnocentrism, nativism, cultural prejudice, and class bias teeming and teaming with racism to harm so many Black lives. […] In reaction to those who acted as if Black male lives mattered the most, antiracist feminists boldly demanded of America to #SayHerName, to shine light on the women who have also been affected by the hands and feet of racism. Perhaps they, the antiracist daughters of Davis, should be held up as symbols of hope, for taking potential and turning it into power. More important, perhaps we should all do the same.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker), Angela Davis
Page Number: 242-243
Explanation and Analysis:
Afterword Quotes

[It all] leads back to the question of whether you, reader, want to be a segregationist (a hater), an assimilationist (a coward), or an antiracist (someone who truly loves).
Choice is yours.
Don’t freak out.
Just breathe in. Inhale. Hold it. Now exhale slowly:
N O W.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker)
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:
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Stamped PDF

Antiracists Term Timeline in Stamped

The timeline below shows where the term Antiracists appears in Stamped. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Introduction
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...if it suggests that one racial group is superior to another, and an idea is antiracist if it suggests that all racial groups are inherently equal. Europeans first invented racist ideas... (full context)
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
...existed in the U.S., and three groups have always fought over them: segregationists, assimilationists, and antiracists. Segregationists and assimilationists blame Black people for inequity, while antiracists blame racism. Segregationists want to... (full context)
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...if they learn about American history. Then, they can work together to build an equitable, antiracist society. (full context)
Chapter 1: The Story of the World’s First Racist
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...tolerate other groups, but only when they adapt to mainstream white culture. The third is antiracists, who just love other people, period. Of course, people—including the reader—can switch between these identities... (full context)
Chapter 3: A Different Adam
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...from “a different Adam.” Meanwhile, in 1688, a group of Pennsylvania Mennonites developed the first antiracist idea by publishing a pamphlet against race-based oppression. (full context)
Chapter 10: The Great Contradictor
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...saw. All in all, Jefferson was sometimes a segregationist and sometimes an assimilationist—but never an antiracist. (full context)
Chapter 13: Complicated Abe
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Americans usually think of Abraham Lincoln as an antiracist “Great Emancipator,” but the truth is much more complicated. Like Jefferson, he was “antislavery and... (full context)
Chapter 14: Garrison’s Last Stand
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...watch from the sidelines. Even though this was a mistake, he was still a great antiracist, because he showed people that slavery was a moral question, not a political one. (full context)
Chapter 18: The Mission Is in the Name
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
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But Marcus Garvey still didn’t think Du Bois was antiracist enough. He noticed that Du Bois thought of himself as better than other Black people... (full context)
Chapter 19: Can’t Sing and Dance and Write It Away
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...focus on impressing white people with their art. But he clashed with a group of antiracist artists who called themselves the “Niggerati.” Led by Langston Hughes, the “Niggerati” thought that Black... (full context)
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...history book about Reconstruction and criticized the U.S. education system. He was finally becoming an antiracist, and he was making the same argument as so many other Black activists: “that Black... (full context)
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How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...suasion, Du Bois finally decided to quit. He started teaching at Atlanta University and advocating antiracist socialism. He saw how the Great Depression affected Black people particularly hard, and Franklin D.... (full context)
Chapter 20: Home Is Where the Hatred Is
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...“Whites only” lunch counters and founded the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which was an antiracist activist group. In 1963, King led a series of protests and wrote his famous “Letter... (full context)
Chapter 21: When Death Comes
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
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...killed four of her childhood friends. Her activist parents had raised her to be an antiracist, and at Brandeis University in Boston, she got to meet some of her idols, like... (full context)
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...whether the bill would do anything. Angela Davis agreed. Why would a racist government enforce antiracist laws? (full context)
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...X was assassinated. Leaders like James Baldwin and Martin Luther King, Jr. honored him, and antiracists everywhere mourned him. Alex Haley published Malcolm X’s influential autobiography, which showed how he went... (full context)
Chapter 22: Black Power
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Americans responded to the Voting Rights Act with new kinds of racist violence and antiracist rebellion. Black people in Los Angeles’s Watts neighborhood rebelled in response to police violence. Meanwhile,... (full context)
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...Black students protested to create Black Studies departments at colleges and universities. They built an antiracist coalition with white anti-war protestors and Latinx activists. But the Black Power movement had its... (full context)
Chapter 23: Murder Was the Case
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...Ali. Finally, Alex Haley published Roots: The Saga of an American Family, an incredibly popular antiracist story about slavery and its legacy. The TV version became the most-watched show of all... (full context)
Chapter 27: A Bill Too Many
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Antiracists kept fighting—the U.N. even held a worldwide antiracist conference in Durban, South Africa in September... (full context)
Chapter 28: A Miracle and Still a Maybe
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...primary elections, the media was busy criticizing Michelle Obama’s body and scrutinizing Obama’s relationship with antiracist pastor Jeremiah Wright. In his eloquent “A More Perfect Union” speech, Obama responded to these... (full context)
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But antiracists will always keep fighting. In response to police violence, the antiracist Black women Alicia Garza,... (full context)
Afterword
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...the media. But everyone can choose whether to be a segregationist, an assimilationist, or an antiracist. (full context)