Strangers in Their Own Land

Strangers in Their Own Land

by

Arlie Russell Hochschild

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Strangers in Their Own Land can help.

Arlie Russell Hochschild Character Analysis

The author is a renowned American sociologist and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. Hochschild travels to Louisiana over five years in an effort to understand the emotional underpinnings of Tea Party conservatism. Her previous work similarly emphasized the emotions that underlie and surround policies and the changing American lifestyle. In Strangers in Their Own Land she deliberately approaches Louisiana conservatives with an attention to the feelings that drive political behavior and gradually comes to understand the conservative deep story. While Hochschild continues to believe that progressive policies are Louisianans’ best option, she nevertheless comes to understand how the fiercely individualistic sense of honor that stems from their endurance self combines with their feeling of exclusion from identity politics to create an understandable (if historically decontextualized and ultimately misguided) shift to the right.

Arlie Russell Hochschild Quotes in Strangers in Their Own Land

The Strangers in Their Own Land quotes below are all either spoken by Arlie Russell Hochschild or refer to Arlie Russell Hochschild . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the The New Press edition of Strangers in Their Own Land published in 2016.
Preface Quotes

As a sociologist I had a keen interest in how life feels to people on the right—that is, in the emotion that underlies politics. To understand their emotions, I had to imagine myself into their shoes. Trying this, I came upon their “deep story,” a narrative as felt.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: xi
Explanation and Analysis:

We, on both sides, wrongly imagine that empathy with the “other” side brings an end to clearheaded analysis when, in truth, it’s on the other side of the bridge that the most important analysis can begin.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Sharon Galicia
Page Number: xiii
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 1 Quotes

Looking out the window of the truck, it’s clear that Mike and I see different things. Mike sees a busy, beloved, bygone world. I see a field of green.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Mike Schaff
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:

How can a system both create pain and deflect blame for that pain?

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:

But first, the people.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 16
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

In the life of one man, Lee Sherman, I saw reflected both sides of the paradox—the need for help and a principled refusal of it.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Lee Sherman, PPG Management
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

The Arenos didn't simply remember the good old days of a clean Bayou d'Inde. They remembered against the great forgetting of industry and state government. This institutional forgetting altered the private act of mourning. And not just that. It altered the Arenos’ very identity. They had not left Bayou d'Inde. They were stayers. They didn't want to leave, and even if they had wanted to, they couldn't afford to. The polluting companies had given them no money to enable them to move. And the value of their house had now fallen, for who would want to live on Bayou d'Inde Pass Road, even in a home as beautifully kept up as theirs? The Arenos had become stay-at-home migrants. They had stayed. The environment had left.

Page Number: 49
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

At least the authors of the protocol were honest in what was a terrible answer to the Great Paradox. “You got a problem? Get used to it.”

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Mike Schaff
Page Number: 111
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

Churches typically ask parishioners to tithe—to give 10 percent of their income. For many this is a large sum, but it is considered an honor to give it. They pay taxes, but they give at church.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Madonna Massey
Page Number: 121
Explanation and Analysis:

As a powerful influence over the views of the people I came to know, Fox News stands next to industry, state government, church, and the regular media as an extra pillar of political culture all its own.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:

The Tea Party listener felt Christiane Amanpour was implicitly scolding her. The woman didn't want to be told she should feel sorry for, or responsible for, the fate of the [sick or starving] child. Amanpour was overstepping her role as a commentator by suggesting how to feel. The woman had her feeling guard up.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 128
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

As an ideal, the American Dream proposed a right way of feeling. You should feel hopeful, energetic, focused, mobilized. Progress—its core idea—didn't go with feeling confused or mournful.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 140-141
Explanation and Analysis:

You are a stranger in your own land. You do not recognize yourself in how others see you. It is a struggle to feel seen and honored. And to feel honored you have to feel—and feel seen as—moving forward. But through no fault of your own, and in ways that are hidden, you are moving backward.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 144
Explanation and Analysis:

Missing from the image of blacks in most of the minds of those I came to know was a man or woman standing patiently in line next to them waiting for a well-deserved reward.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 148
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

“I don't mind somebody being gay if they want to be gay. Just be a regular person, go to work, mow the lawn, fish. You don't have to be shouting it from the mountaintops. Don't make me change and don't call me a bigot if I don't.”

Related Characters: Janice Areno (speaker), Arlie Russell Hochschild
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:

Sometimes Team Players had to suck it up and just cope.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Janice Areno
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

Jackie's lesson ran counter to the deep story; one shouldn't wish too much for what seems like the next step toward the American Dream. That was grabbing. On the other hand, she had struggled hard emotionally not to grab for it.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Jackie Tabor
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

“We need Mikes.” Don't be a Cowboy in enduring pollution, he seemed to say. Be a Cowboy fighting it.

Related Symbols: The Bayou Corne Sinkhole
Page Number: 195
Explanation and Analysis:

Without a national vision based on the common good, none of us could leave a natural heritage to our children, or, as the General said, be “free.” A free market didn't make us a free people, I thought. But I had slipped way over to my side of the empathy wall again.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Russel Honoré
Page Number: 201-202
Explanation and Analysis:

The “federal government” filled a mental space in Mike's mind—and the minds of all those on the right I came to know—associated with a financial sinkhole.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Mike Schaff
Related Symbols: The Bayou Corne Sinkhole
Page Number: 202
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

How do you join the identity politics parade and also bring it to a halt?

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 212
Explanation and Analysis:

For the Tea Party around the country, the shifting moral qualifications for the American Dream had turned them into strangers in their own land, afraid, resentful, displaced, and dismissed by the very people who were, they felt, cutting in line. The undeclared class war transpiring on a different stage, with different actors, and evoking a different notion of fairness was leading those engaged in it to blame the “supplier” of the impostors—the federal government.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

While economic self-interest is never entirely absent, what I discovered was the profound importance of emotional self-interest—a giddy release from the feeling of being a stranger in one’s own land.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Donald Trump
Page Number: 228
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

Louisianans are sacrificial lambs to the entire American industrial system. Left or right, we all happily use plastic combs, toothbrushes, cell phones, and cars, but we don't all pay for it with high pollution. As research for this book shows, red states pay for it more—partly through their own votes for easier regulation and partly through their exposure to a social terrain of politics, industry, television channels, and a pulpit that invites them to do so. In one way, people in blue states have their cake and cat it too, while many in red states have neither. Paradoxically, politicians on the right appeal to this sense of victimhood, even when policies such as those of former governor Jindal exacerbate the problem.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Bobby Jindal
Page Number: 232
Explanation and Analysis:
Afterword Quotes

Disaggregated, such smaller narratives hung free, maybe to gather in some new way downstream. And to all this was the background presence of a powerful truth—life had been hard for them and it could get a lot worse.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 256
Explanation and Analysis:

The history of the United States has been the history of whites cutting ahead of blacks, first of all through slavery, and later through Jim Crow laws and then through New Deal legislation and the post-World War II GI Bill, which offered help to millions of Americans with the exception of those in farm and domestic work, occupations in which blacks were overrepresented. And racial discrimination continues today.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 260-1
Explanation and Analysis:

For the most part, the real line cutters are not people one can blame or politicians [one] can thunder against. That’s because they’re not people. They’re robots. Nothing is changing the face of American industry faster than automation, and nowhere is that change more stark than in the cornerstone of Louisiana’s industrial wealth, oil.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker)
Page Number: 261
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Strangers in Their Own Land LitChart as a printable PDF.
Strangers in Their Own Land PDF

Arlie Russell Hochschild Character Timeline in Strangers in Their Own Land

The timeline below shows where the character Arlie Russell Hochschild appears in Strangers in Their Own Land. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Preface
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Alarmed at the increasing political hostility between the American left and right, liberal sociologist Arlie Hochschild started researching this book in an attempt to understand conservatives. While most researchers approach polarization... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
This is Hochschild’s first book about politics, but she has used the same “close-up approach” in the past.... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
One of the people Hochschild followed on her journey was Sharon Galicia, a boisterous single mother who sold medical insurance... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild thanked Sharon as much for the window into her life as for her precious “gift... (full context)
Chapter 1 – Traveling to the Heart
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Louisiana native Mike Schaff drives Hochschild around the old plantation where he grew up, showing her where his family and community... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Mike Schaff proclaims his loyalty to the Tea Party. Hochschild first met him at an environmental rally where he was speaking. A few years before,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild suggests that her confusion might stem from an “empathy wall” between her and Mike. (An... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild notes that “partyism” (prejudice based on political party) is now the greatest dividing line in... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
But Hochschild argues that “this split has widened because the right has moved right, not because the... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees Louisiana as an “extreme example” of the phenomenon she calls the Great Paradox: although... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...also receive more money from the federal government than blue (Democratic) states, but many Louisianans Hochschild meets—including Mike Schaff—want to keep that federal money away. Like Schaff, many Louisianans deny climate... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild considers Alec MacGillis’s popular explanation for the Great Paradox: MacGillis thinks that everyone votes in... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild explains how the growth of Southern conservatism since the 1970s has made the region “the... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild was lucky to find a contact in the southwest Louisiana town of Lake Charles: Sally... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild examines common theories about “the rise of the right.” Liberal scholars suspect that corporate donors... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...scholars believe that the Tea Party emerged from specific Southern regional traditions and cultural values. Hochschild agrees that the South prides itself on resistance to the federal government and that its... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...political beliefs—the “story that feels as if it were true” on each side of the aisle—Hochschild believes she can understand “the shoulds and shouldn’ts of feeling,” as well as Republican politicians’... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild’s research started with focus groups in Sally Cappel’s kitchen, which built into a broader network... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild’s subjects varied widely in areas like their commitment to church, adherence to mainline Tea Party... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild compares the list of registered student organizations at Louisiana State University—which focus on religion, agriculture,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Before setting off for Louisiana, Hochschild re-read the “Tea Party bible,” Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged. Rand argued that “greed is good”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild remembers meeting gospel singer Madonna Massey at a Republican Women of Southwest Louisiana meeting. Madonna... (full context)
Chapter 2 – “One Thing Good”
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
82-year-old Lee Sherman waits for Hochschild on his front porch and greets her with “a welcoming smile.” In his youth, Sherman... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
...the 1980s after leaving PPG, but now he is an activist for the Tea Party. Hochschild wonders how Sherman squares his opposition to regulation with his past environmentalism and suggests that... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Lee Sherman tells Hochschild about a public meeting organized to address the contamination. PPG and state officials sat together... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
...to regulate itself, but he came to reject federal regulation as a solution for pollution. Hochschild sees “both sides of the Great Paradox” in Sherman: “the need for help and a... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild sees three main reasons Tea Party voters reject government intervention: religion, taxes, and honor. Lee’s... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...be seeking vindication against the government, just like he did against PPG. Both wronged him, Hochschild suggests, but at least PPG gave him a good paycheck and a place to show... (full context)
Chapter 3 – The Rememberers
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sits in the living room of 77-year-old Harold Areno, “a gentle Cajun pipefitter” who takes... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...turtles, cows, chickens, goats, sheep, and even hogs (which Harold notes “can stand almost everything”). Hochschild compares the Arenos’ land to “the scene of a slow-motion crime” and she sees “both... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...it on the riverbanks. Seeing that the government had failed the Arenos in this regard, Hochschild them whether they want stricter pollution regulations, and Harold says yes. He and Annette recognize... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...down and he suggests that the oil industry’s advertising is “trying to make us forget.” Hochschild argues that the Arenos “remembered against” a “larger institutional forgetting” that prevented them from leaving... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild also met other “rememberers,” like the nameless Forest Service worker who set up plaques memorializing... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...media reinforces the “basic feeling around town” that nostalgia is a barrier to economic progress. Hochschild sees this as a kind of structural amnesia, a term coined by anthropologist E.E. Evans-Pritchard... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
On her way out, Hochschild asks the Arenos about a lawsuit they have filed against 22 polluting companies. They have... (full context)
Chapter 4 – The Candidates
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild attends campaign event thrown by Republican representative Charles Boustany, who is running against Tea Party... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild feels that she is “backing into the deep story” by noticing what that story excludes.... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild is “struck by what both candidates avoid saying.” They fail to mention the state’s widespread... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild interviews “three dozen retired plant workers” who remember when Louisiana used to consistently vote for... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild meets gubernatorial candidate Russel Honoré, an Army general who led the Hurricane Katrina rescue effort... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild and Honoré travel to the town of Gonzales, which lies within “one of the most... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild realizes how easy it is to “forget or ignore the problems with Louisiana’s environment.” But... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...moratorium and most did not think differently about global warming or pollution after the spill. Hochschild finds the same attitudes near Lake Charles: many Louisianans believe government regulation is unnecessary because... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild considers the possibility that Louisianans’ frustration with the drilling moratorium might simply be an extension... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild contrasts these light regulations on drinking and shooting with the severe restrictions Louisiana places on... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Louise, a Louisiana mother who lives near petrochemical plants, told Hochschild how she anxiously watches for signs of another accident. Another man suggested that “they don’t... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild returns to her drive with Honoré. She asked him to answer one of the most... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Reflecting on the meetings she had attended during the campaign, Hochschild notes that Louisianans worry “a great deal about freedom in the sense of freedom to”... (full context)
Chapter 5 – The “Least Resistant Personality”
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Over coffee in Baton Rouge, Hochschild meets Dr. Paul Templet, a chemical physicist from the area who used to teach at... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild wonders whether lawmakers might prioritize oil because it brings in so much tax revenue. While... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild and Dr. Templet start on “a second round of coffee and a second layer of... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild calls Louisiana’s strategy for economic growth the “low road” approach: by creating conditions that make... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild and Templet order yet another round of coffee, and she asks him about the idea... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild hypothesizes that conservatives might not know about this consensus due to the “growing dominance of... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...if Louisiana is an “oddball oil state” rather than the true “heart of the right,” Hochschild reads a “startling” study demonstrating that red states are more polluted than blue states; her... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild wonders why companies like PPG would specifically choose to build plants in Louisiana. She discovers... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...low educational attainment and lacking a “culture of activism;” and working in “nature exploitative occupations.” Hochschild realizes that these all the Louisiana residents she has been studying fit the description. She... (full context)
Chapter 6 – Industry: “The Buckle in America’s Energy Belt”
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild sits in the office of Westlake, Louisiana mayor Bob Hardey, who shows her the video... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild describes Westlake as “a sprawling gray expanse of smokestacks rising from immense steel-girded fortresses” that... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hardey drives Hochschild around town, showing her the restaurants, churches, shops, and schools that sustain everyday life in... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild summarizes the century-long history of expanding oil extraction in the region. New fracking technology promises... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...that mean “today’s not a good day to be outside” for people with respiratory problems. Hochschild wonders whether any of this is really necessary—in a “strange cycle,” Sasol is making plastic... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild summarizes the oil policies of Huey Long, Louisiana’s governor during the Great Depression, who taxed... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...school but “discovered [he] could do things” while working at the Phillips 66 petrochemical plant. Hochschild suggests that he wonders, “why couldn’t blacks and legal immigrants do the same?” Other locals... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild examines a “Regional Impact Study” Sasol conducted during the construction, which suggested that the scientists... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild notes that nobody at the groundbreaking ceremony mentioned the Condea Vista ethylene dichloride leak in... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild starts to think that Bob Hardey, one very powerful person with the “least resistant personality”... (full context)
Chapter 7 – The State: Governing the Market 4,000 Feet Below
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Hochschild meets Mike Schaff in his 350-person town of Bayou Corne. Like him, Schaff’s neighbors enjoy... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...deep underground, started to collapse and suck down the 4,000 feet of earth above it. Hochschild wonders “how a free-market economy in a highly regulation-averse culture” can deal with private corporations... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...residents, many of whom were still homeless and frustrated. Jindal speeds through his remarks, which Hochschild says “conveys mastery, urgency, busyness, and, perhaps, avoidance.” He promises to appoint a commission to... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild meets Mike Schaff at his home on Crawfish Street. He apologizes for his lawn’s poor... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Mike talks nostalgically about Bayou Corne’s tight-knit community as he shows Hochschild around the abandoned town. Other residents she interviewed felt the same way: their community was... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...knew they were drilling near a weak cavern wall that could lead to a sinkhole. Hochschild remarks that the problem was “that the state government had barely been present at all,”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild cites an EPA report that named Louisiana the worst implementer of federal environmental protection laws... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild notes that official environmental reports were “nearly unreadable” and often contradictory. As an example of... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
When Hochschild mentions this report to Mike, he is unsurprised: “there it is again, more bad government.”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild still cannot wrap her head around how Mike thinks “a total free-market world and local... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild asks Mike whether he is grateful for anything federal government has done for him—he cites... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild wonders “what image of the government was at play” in Mike’s mind, and she compares... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
But Hochschild sees another, deeper cause behind Mike’s feelings about government. This is the idea that “the... (full context)
Chapter 8 – The Pulpit and the Press: “The Topic Doesn’t Come Up”
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Upon meeting Madonna Massey at Starbucks in Lake Charles, Hochschild immediately notes “how many people seem happy to see her.” They complement Madonna’s clothes and... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild has “explored industry and the state” as key institutions in the “social terrain” of Louisiana,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild visits the Masseys’ Living Way Pentecostal Church, where Madonna’s husband, Glenn, is the pastor. She... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
The Masseys’ church “focuses on human healing,” a role Hochschild suggests that “psychotherapy and meditation, as well as family and friendship” fill in other cultures.... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...the environmental catastrophes that people like the Arenos and Mike Schaff are facing. Massey tells Hochschild that she is “so for capitalism and free enterprise” but hates regulations that decide “the... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...church with her success, and many others in her congregation feel the same way. But Hochschild notes that “there were rich churches and poor churches,” as well as white churches and... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild learns that Louisiana’s “religious community appreciates the outdoors” but notes that she cannot find information... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
The churches Hochschild visited emphasized “a person’s moral strength to endure” above “the will to change the circumstances... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Internet depictions of the rapture, Hochschild realizes, show a minority of “svelte, well-dressed adults” rising up to Heaven. She suggests such... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Over tea, Madonna Massey shows Hochschild the conservative pundits, politicians, church leaders, and news sources she follows on Twitter. Fox News,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Yet Hochschild notes that “none of the people I talked to” echoed the “extreme language” of Fox,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...surveillance operation” approved by the company’s president. Mother Jones magazine—a progressive publication that none of Hochschild’s interviewees had ever encountered—broke the story in 2008, but Louisiana newspapers barely mentioned it, and... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild reflects on a general trend she has discovered in Louisiana environmental politics: everyone suffers from... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild returns to the idea of structural amnesia, suggesting that Louisianans focus on problems like people... (full context)
Chapter 9 – The Deep Story
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Behind the stories she is hearing, Hochschild sees a deep story. A deep story is a “feels-as-if story” rather than a story... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild likens this deep story to waiting in line for the American Dream that lies just... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees this deep story as a “response to a real squeeze,” namely the tension between... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild met a 63-year-old man with a “cherubic smile” whom she calls Bill Beatifo. Beatifo was... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild sends her story to the people she has met, and they strongly affirm her picture... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Many of Hochschild’s Louisiana acquaintances feel sympathy fatigue. At first, they are sympathetic to marginalized groups, but they... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild sees race as a critical undertone to the Tea Party’s resentment. Many of her acquaintances... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild offers a different, sociological definition of racism as “the belief in a natural hierarchy that... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild explains that many of her older white Tea Party interviewees only encountered black people through... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Gender also plays a key role in the Tea Party’s deep story—every woman Hochschild interviewed had needed to work at some point in their lives, but most would have... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Although Hochschild recognizes that the right seldom uses the term, she conceives the feeling of being cut... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...in reality, they miss the way corporations are gaining more power and paying workers less. Hochschild thinks this explains why conservative small business owners support policies like new bankruptcy and contract... (full context)
Chapter 10 – The Team Player: Loyalty Above All
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild visits Janice Areno, who is clearly a Republican, as her office is filled with elephant... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Janice drives Hochschild from her office to her old school in Sulphur, Louisiana. She talks about her “poor... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild describes “three distinct expressions of this endurance self.” She calls these three varieties the Worshipper,... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Janice and Hochschild go to Janice’s church, where they drop off plates and cups for a fundraising dinner... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...of school. She is proud to have never taken money from the federal government, which Hochschild explains was a common “source of honor” in Louisiana. She complains about all the people... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
...to give them milk, which supposedly helped protect against the health dangers of aluminum fumes. Hochschild suggests that she has “a company perspective.” (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild asks whether she thinks there should be welfare for children in poverty, but Janice proposes... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
...in the Middle East, Janice argues, people would “solve their own differences” and create democracies. Hochschild notes that many Louisianans panicked after Obama’s election, when they started to suspect that “he... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Janice also thinks there are too many federal workers—many of the people Hochschild interviewed estimated that around 40% of Americans work for the government, but the real number... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild asks about industrial pollution; Janice mentions the devastated Bayou d’Inde and how it saddens her.... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
She tells Hochschild a “shocking” story about her nephew Dicky, who came face-to-face with pollution, and Hochschild insists... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Janice drives Hochschild to her “barn,” the dream retirement home she has been building from scratch.  She has... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild notices “how the deep story makes sense” for Janice, as someone who has “made it... (full context)
Chapter 11 – The Worshipper: Invisible Renunciation
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie Tabor, an exuberant stay-at-home mother, guides Hochschild through her home. In the living room, she mentions that her husband Heath built the... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...burning in 2010 but never worried about its effects on his food, and Jackie shows Hochschild a picture of her ten-year-old son featured in a children’s fishing magazine. (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...and the children she cares for full-time. She declares that she “came from nothing!” and Hochschild explains that her childhood taught her to sometimes “give up wanting something very badly.” Jackie... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Jackie told Hochschild about her love for nature—unlike Janice, who “quickly moved on” when Hochschild mentioned environmental pollution,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild explains that Jackie’s childhood might explain her loyalty to oil. Once, she was “nineteen, jobless,... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie asks whether she can take Hochschild “on an adventure,” and the two drive around to Jackie’s three previous houses. The first... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild explains how Jackie became “an obedient Christian wife” who puts her husband’s desires before her... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees each different house as “a step on a ladder to the American Dream,” but... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees Jackie as a Worshipper who had “developed a worshipful attitude and a capacity for... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
To Hochschild’s surprise, Jackie says she is named after Jacqueline Kennedy. She still admires her namesake but... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...government, Jackie remains loyal to the Constitution and the American flag. At a school function, Hochschild recalls Jackie’s son reading from a Bible passage before “America the Beautiful” played over a... (full context)
Chapter 12 – The Cowboy: Stoicism
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
...Fay Brantley’s Sunday dinner in Longville, just north of Lake Charles. Mike Tritico has invited Hochschild to the dinner, and the onion is Cappy’s “half joke and half serious” way of... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...Sundays for polite arguments about politics, religion, and the environment, held at gender-segregated tables. But Hochschild is permitted to sit at the men’s table, so she can hear Mike argue with... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild first describes Donny as “a retired telephone company worker who hates regulators.” He grew up... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...there. Mike accuses Donny of having the mindset that has caused the region’s health issues; Hochschild sees that the room is focused on their conversation and “the two are approaching a... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...the guests switch to dessert, Mike accuses Donny of parroting the chemical companies’ ideology. In Hochschild’s words, Mike thinks that Donny “embraces their right to take risks with our lives.” And,... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild notes that Donny and Mike’s debate reflects a broader trend about Louisianans’ fears of pollution.... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...honor as a function of bravery, but Mike “wanted to reduce the need for bravery.” Hochschild argues that Mike’s environmental activism—which once led to construction workers driving him off the highway—is... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild suggests that, in terms of regulation, “Louisiana is a Cowboy kind of state” that carries... (full context)
Chapter 13 – The Rebel: A Team Loyalist with a New Cause
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild sees a variety of handmade signs in the crowd of 150 protestors at the state... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild talks about the 1980 drilling disaster at Lake Peigneur, just a few miles from Bayou... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...EPA and make insurance companies, rather than the government, take charge of drilling regulations. But Hochschild worries that this was exactly the arrangement at Bayou Corne—in fact, the insurance company sued... (full context)
Chapter 14 – The Fires of History: The 1860s and the 1960s
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild wonders about the historical influences that have led to the Tea Party’s rise. Clearly, it... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild sees oil as “the new cotton.” Oil barons have even bought old cotton plantations, and... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild meets a period actor who plays a Confederate soldier at the Oak Alley Plantation, which... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild next argues that, amid the cultural changes in the 1960s and 1970s, “a long parade... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...moment” of this period was the 1964 Freedom Summer, when students and civil rights workers—including Hochschild and her husband—traveled South to register voters, teach informal classes, and otherwise help advance black... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild’s friends in the Tea Party adopted parts of this 1960s and 1970s culture while rejecting... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild asks where this population of Southern whites could find another source of pride. Their work... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Many of Hochschild’s friends in Louisiana worried about Syrian refugees coming to the United States after 2015. Lee... (full context)
Chapter 15 – Strangers No Longer: The Power of Promise
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
During the last years of Hochschild’s research in Louisiana, something monumental happened. On one of these later trips, she went to... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees that “the scene had been set for Trump’s rise” for three reasons: white conservatives... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
It is the day before the Louisiana Republican primary, and Hochschild attends Donald Trump’s rally in New Orleans. Supporters bus in from around the state and... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild calls Trump an “emotions candidate” because he focuses on provoking emotional responses from supporters rather... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild argues that this release from the rules of political correctness created a “high” that conservatives... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
On her last visit, about half of Hochschild’s friends in Louisiana backed Trump. Janice Areno and Donny McCorquodale were ardent supporters; Mike Schaff... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Many Louisianans appreciate Trump’s business success, exhibiting a faith in capitalism that Hochschild contrasts with the turn to socialism during the Great Depression. They also appreciate his outward... (full context)
Chapter 16 – “They Say There Are Beautiful Trees”
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
But Hochschild’s acquaintances in the Louisiana Tea Party still voted for him and opposed his successor, Democrat... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild sees the left and right, as well as urban blue areas and rural red ones,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Despite this interdependence, Hochschild remarks that she “was humbled by the complexity and height of the empathy wall” throughout... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Back in California, Hochschild looks out on the San Francisco Bay and remembers that there are environmental problems in... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...people’s deeply-held values rather than the “bad angels of their nature,” as liberals might expect. Hochschild concludes the short letter by asking liberals to “consider the possibility that in their situation,... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
In her letter to right-wing Louisianans, Hochschild explains that many progressives are just as disgruntled with American government as they are, and... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
In the same letter, Hochschild compares Louisiana to Norway, which has a similar population and also runs on an oil-based... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild explains that the left and right focus on different class conflicts that follow from their... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Hochschild walks around Berkeley, wondering what her Louisiana friends would think of her liberal enclave. Would... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
...took a trip to Israel and opened a stationary bicycle gym in Lake Charles. On Hochschild’s last visit, Janice Areno joked that she was “a green person” when her air conditioner... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...near his childhood home and the enormous Atchafalaya Basin National Wildlife Refuge, where he took Hochschild out fishing. But he has “gone from the frying pan to the fire”—a fracking company... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
The last time Hochschild visited the Arenos, Harold told her that the water may be getting clearer. He gazed... (full context)
Afterword to the Paperback Edition
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...was published in September 2016, just months before Donald Trump’s election. In the following year, Hochschild returned to Louisiana three times to check in on her friends and acquaintances there. Hochschild... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild wonders whether Trump’s policy agenda intentionally takes after Louisiana’s. Ultimately, Governor Jindal left the state... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Most of the mail Hochschild received after publishing Strangers in Their Own Land came from worried liberals who “despaired of... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
After the election, Hochschild repeatedly visited Sharon Galicia, who initially favored Ted Cruz but warmed up to Donald Trump... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...toxin monitors rather than bureaucracy to enforce environmental regulations and simply abolish state regulatory agencies. Hochschild sees this plan as “advocating for an honest, well-functioning federal government.” (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild brings her son David to meet Mike—the men “were polar opposites in nearly every way,”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Lee Sherman has stayed in touch with Hochschild by phone. Lee adores Donald Trump, watches 14 hours of Fox News a day, and... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...it. The man was Ray Bowman, a former plant worker and union president who told Hochschild he was tasked with collecting dead fish when he worked for Citgo decades before. He... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...visitors cannot get to their house because “a company flagman could halt traffic for hours.” Hochschild followed them to church one Sunday, where the minister warned the congregation about communists and... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Janice Areno wears a jersey reading “ADORABLE DEPLORABLES” to a dinner Hochschild hosts in Lake Charles and later mails one to her in Berkeley. (The line is... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
A year after Hochschild first published this book, white nationalists and neo-Nazis assembled for a “Unite the Right” rally... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild explains that the events in Charlottesville were “rekindling a nationwide racism that had never disappeared.”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
But Hochschild’s interviewees “also had feelings for which they found no place in the liberal world.” They... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild concludes that Louisianans’ hostility to “unitary,” explicit racism is undermined by the racist “subnarratives” they... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...dwindling for everyone besides the wealthiest Americans. Back in a wealthy residential section of Berkeley, Hochschild notes that property values have risen so sharply that “it would be impossible to afford... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild’s interviewees also disagree about the Robert E. Lee statue that the Charlottesville protestors wanted to... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...about Mexican immigrant workers and “Muslims building local mosques that would teach sharia law.” But Hochschild notes that Mitt Romney and Donald Trump won the same proportion of the white vote... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild mentions a few other letters she received: a man from rural Virginia who stumbled on... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild asks why, according to her interviewees’ deep story, the line for the American Dream has... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Who, Hochschild asks, are “the real line cutters”? She concludes that they are robots. Automation disproportionately threatens... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...incoming students at Louisiana State University’s Honor College were assigned the book as summer reading. Hochschild spoke to the students at the beginning of their first semester and knew that many... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
As a student interested in the government, Hochschild said, she would try to understand Americans’ distrust in government and compare the American government’s... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
In her speeches to other audiences, Hochschild emphasizes the “four pillars of activism” that liberals can use to help heal the current... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
...pundit Frank Rich, have tried to shut down this kind of dialogue since the election. Hochschild argues that “Rich confuses talk with surrender and empathy with weakness.” In fact, many voters... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees a recent decline in intermixture among “Americans who differ by class, race, and region.”... (full context)
Appendix A – The Research
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild explain that sociologists describe research methods like the one used for this book as “‘exploratory’... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild used this method for much of her previous research, adapting it to each particular topic.... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
All in all, Hochschild interviewed 40 Tea Party members and 20 other community members for context. Interviewees signed consent... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Along with her research assistants, Hochschild also studied national opinion polls and compared them to her interviewees’ beliefs. Soon, she became... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Hochschild also “explored Louisiana” through visits to various institutions and events. She went to Angola Prison,... (full context)
Appendix B – Politics and Pollution: National Discoveries from ToxMap
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild initially expected that people who live in more polluted places would be more worried about... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...same people who had to deal with pollution were actually the ones voting against regulations. Hochschild and her research assistant compared the University of Chicago’s General Social Survey, “widely regarded by... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...“strong Republican,” male, Christian, and high income were also less likely to worry about pollution. Hochschild describes these findings as “a paradox, but not one born of ignorance” because those more... (full context)
Appendix C – Fact-Checking Common Impressions
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...my new friends and I lived not only in different regions but in different truths,” Hochschild decides to have her research assistant fact-check the most popular ones. (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Hochschild cites five studies suggesting that environmental protection laws seem to have little or no impact... (full context)