Strangers in Their Own Land

Strangers in Their Own Land

by

Arlie Russell Hochschild

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A 43-year-old homemaker who lives as an “obedient Christian wife” to her husband Heath along with their two children and dogs in a wealthy suburb of Lake Charles. Jackie grew up in a toxic family environment but found her way out through faith in God, and she copes with Louisiana’s literally toxic environment through the same renunciation of control that she credits with all her successes. She showed Hochschild the three smaller houses where she previously lived and believes that she was rewarded with the American Dream precisely because she decided not to covet a wealthier lifestyle. She exemplifies the Worshipper subtype of the endurance self.

Jackie Tabor Quotes in Strangers in Their Own Land

The Strangers in Their Own Land quotes below are all either spoken by Jackie Tabor or refer to Jackie Tabor. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the The New Press edition of Strangers in Their Own Land published in 2016.
Chapter 11 Quotes

Jackie's lesson ran counter to the deep story; one shouldn't wish too much for what seems like the next step toward the American Dream. That was grabbing. On the other hand, she had struggled hard emotionally not to grab for it.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Jackie Tabor
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Strangers in Their Own Land LitChart as a printable PDF.
Strangers in Their Own Land PDF

Jackie Tabor Character Timeline in Strangers in Their Own Land

The timeline below shows where the character Jackie Tabor appears in Strangers in Their Own Land. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 11 – The Worshipper: Invisible Renunciation
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie Tabor, an exuberant stay-at-home mother, guides Hochschild through her home. In the living room, she... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...Horizon fire burning in 2010 but never worried about its effects on his food, and Jackie shows Hochschild a picture of her ten-year-old son featured in a children’s fishing magazine. (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie credits Jesus for “all she treasures”: she lives in a beautiful suburban house outside Lake... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Jackie told Hochschild about her love for nature—unlike Janice, who “quickly moved on” when Hochschild mentioned... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild explains that Jackie’s childhood might explain her loyalty to oil. Once, she was “nineteen, jobless, homeless” and moved... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...to Him.” She credits all her successes in life to that single moment of realization. Jackie contrasts great figures like President Lincoln, who are hidden in the past, with Jesus, who... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie asks whether she can take Hochschild “on an adventure,” and the two drive around to... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild explains how Jackie became “an obedient Christian wife” who puts her husband’s desires before her own. Like Adam... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...sees each different house as “a step on a ladder to the American Dream,” but Jackie realized that “on one rung she had yearned too much for the next: that was... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Similarly, when Heath insisted on tithing 10 percent of their income to church, Jackie worried that they could not afford to both tithe and pay off their debt. But,... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Even though she knew she was a natural and strong leader, Jackie believes she was created to be a “helpmate to her husband” and she values the... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Jackie mentions Louisiana’s “terribly polluted environment” and remarks that her son’s nine-year-old best friend recently died... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild sees Jackie as a Worshipper who had “developed a worshipful attitude and a capacity for meaningful renunciation.”... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
To Hochschild’s surprise, Jackie says she is named after Jacqueline Kennedy. She still admires her namesake but thinks today’s... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Jackie wishes polluters could be regulated but trusts neither the government, which she thinks uses pollution... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Despite her malaise about the government, Jackie remains loyal to the Constitution and the American flag. At a school function, Hochschild recalls... (full context)
Chapter 12 – The Cowboy: Stoicism
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...a series of dangerous jobs and “hates environmentalists.” If Janice is a Team Loyalist and Jackie is a Worshipper, Hochschild explains, then Donny is a Cowboy: he “came to endurance […]... (full context)
Chapter 14 – The Fires of History: The 1860s and the 1960s
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...in their own country (as he says the South did during the Civil War), and Jackie Tabor felt that Islam was a threat to American culture. The Tea Party allowed its... (full context)
Chapter 15 – Strangers No Longer: The Power of Promise
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...backed Trump. Janice Areno and Donny McCorquodale were ardent supporters; Mike Schaff preferred Ted Cruz. Jackie Tabor, Harold and Annette Areno, Sharon Galicia and others Hochschild encountered were worried about Trump’s... (full context)
Chapter 16 – “They Say There Are Beautiful Trees”
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Jackie Tabor took a trip to Israel and opened a stationary bicycle gym in Lake Charles.... (full context)