Strangers in Their Own Land

Strangers in Their Own Land

by

Arlie Russell Hochschild

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Janice Areno Character Analysis

Harold and Annette Areno’s niece, an accountant who Hochschild profiles in Chapter 10. Janice is so loyal to the Republican Party that she collects elephant statues—she exemplifies the Team Loyalist subtype of the endurance self. She is deeply religious, will sacrifice anything for her family, and even “dresses Pentecostal” without makeup or jewelry. Hard work is her cardinal virtue, and she is proud of her ability to endure difficult conditions without needing government assistance. In fact, she has little sympathy for people who refuse to work and thinks the government should “let them starve.” She sees government spending as wasteful and “personal morality” as increasingly eroding in the liberal parts of America. She spent years building her dream retirement home by hand and comes to resolutely support Donald Trump.

Janice Areno Quotes in Strangers in Their Own Land

The Strangers in Their Own Land quotes below are all either spoken by Janice Areno or refer to Janice Areno. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the The New Press edition of Strangers in Their Own Land published in 2016.
Chapter 10 Quotes

“I don't mind somebody being gay if they want to be gay. Just be a regular person, go to work, mow the lawn, fish. You don't have to be shouting it from the mountaintops. Don't make me change and don't call me a bigot if I don't.”

Related Characters: Janice Areno (speaker), Arlie Russell Hochschild
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:

Sometimes Team Players had to suck it up and just cope.

Related Characters: Arlie Russell Hochschild (speaker), Janice Areno
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
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Janice Areno Character Timeline in Strangers in Their Own Land

The timeline below shows where the character Janice Areno appears in Strangers in Their Own Land. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 10 – The Team Player: Loyalty Above All
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild visits Janice Areno, who is clearly a Republican, as her office is filled with elephant statues of... (full context)
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Janice drives Hochschild from her office to her old school in Sulphur, Louisiana. She talks about... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...Republican Party; a Worshipper “sacrifices a strong wish”; and a Cowboy “affirms a fearless self.” Janice exemplifies the Team Loyalist. (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Janice and Hochschild go to Janice’s church, where they drop off plates and cups for a... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Next, they go to Janice’s childhood church, and she explains that this is where she learned about the “honor of... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Janice thinks that people should take risky work in stride and she complains that her brothers’... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Janice sees even hard but meaningless work as honorable because it disciplines people—if there are no... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...“driving up in Lexus cars” to bring their kids to a government-funded Head Start program. Janice acknowledges that “some people think I’m too hard-nosed,” but she declares that, “if people refuse... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Hochschild asks whether she thinks there should be welfare for children in poverty, but Janice proposes that it’s the children’s responsibility to get themselves educated, “churched,” and out of poverty.... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Janice feels that the government also “does too much and owns too much.” She thinks it... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Janice also thinks there are too many federal workers—many of the people Hochschild interviewed estimated that... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Janice is concerned not only about “the moral laxity of the Democrats,” but more crucially about... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild asks about industrial pollution; Janice mentions the devastated Bayou d’Inde and how it saddens her. But she thinks the petrochemical... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
...who came face-to-face with pollution, and Hochschild insists on meeting him. When they meet at Janice’s aunt’s house, Dicky tells Hochschild about one day he was riding his horse, Ted, in... (full context)
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
Janice drives Hochschild to her “barn,” the dream retirement home she has been building from scratch. ... (full context)
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Hochschild notices “how the deep story makes sense” for Janice, as someone who has “made it out of the structural squeeze” and reached economic security... (full context)
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
After a couple of years, Janice’s sister—who started suffering “a debilitating autoimmune disease” as the result of toxic exposure at the... (full context)
Chapter 11 – The Worshipper: Invisible Renunciation
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Jackie told Hochschild about her love for nature—unlike Janice, who “quickly moved on” when Hochschild mentioned environmental pollution, Jackie brings it up herself: she... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
The Environment and the Economy Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...“developed a worshipful attitude and a capacity for meaningful renunciation.” Just as “Team Loyalists like Janice Areno,” Jackie is able to “do without what [she] wanted” by accommodating pollution for the... (full context)
Chapter 12 – The Cowboy: Stoicism
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
...an hour—in reverse.” Donny has worked a series of dangerous jobs and “hates environmentalists.” If Janice is a Team Loyalist and Jackie is a Worshipper, Hochschild explains, then Donny is a... (full context)
Chapter 15 – Strangers No Longer: The Power of Promise
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
On her last visit, about half of Hochschild’s friends in Louisiana backed Trump. Janice Areno and Donny McCorquodale were ardent supporters; Mike Schaff preferred Ted Cruz. Jackie Tabor, Harold... (full context)
Chapter 16 – “They Say There Are Beautiful Trees”
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Government Regulation and Individual Freedom Theme Icon
...walks around Berkeley, wondering what her Louisiana friends would think of her liberal enclave. Would Janice Areno see a vegan restaurant with a monthly pay-what-you-want day as “hippy-dippy or as a... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
...to Israel and opened a stationary bicycle gym in Lake Charles. On Hochschild’s last visit, Janice Areno joked that she was “a green person” when her air conditioner clicked off. The... (full context)
Afterword to the Paperback Edition
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Personal Identity and Emotional Self-Interest Theme Icon
Janice Areno wears a jersey reading “ADORABLE DEPLORABLES” to a dinner Hochschild hosts in Lake Charles... (full context)
Trust, Empathy, and Political Progress Theme Icon
Capitalism, Media, and Class Conflict Theme Icon
...with Hochschild that a statue of Frederick Douglass should be erected alongside it, and others—like Janice Areno—worry that taking down one statue would cause a slippery slope whereby liberals can “go... (full context)