Thank You for Arguing

Marcus Tullius Cicero Character Analysis

Ancient Roman orator and politician, often considered the greatest public speaker in Western history. Cicero was a key figure in the history of rhetoric: he pioneered countless persuasive techniques that speakers continue to use in the 21st century, and developed a sophisticated method for planning and delivering effective speeches, which Jay Heinrichs uses toward the end of Thank You for Arguing.

Marcus Tullius Cicero Quotes in Thank You for Arguing

The Thank You for Arguing quotes below are all either spoken by Marcus Tullius Cicero or refer to Marcus Tullius Cicero. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Ethos Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Three Rivers Press edition of Thank You for Arguing published in 2013.
Chapter 25 Quotes

Cicero says I should be prepared to argue both sides of the case, starting with my opponent’s pitch. This means spending some time imagining what he will say. I’m guessing he will talk about values a lot—the rights and freedoms that a noise ordinance will trample upon.

Related Characters: Jay Heinrichs (speaker), Marcus Tullius Cicero
Page Number: 282
Explanation and Analysis:

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Marcus Tullius Cicero Character Timeline in Thank You for Arguing

The timeline below shows where the character Marcus Tullius Cicero appears in Thank You for Arguing. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: Set Your Goals: Cicero’s Lightbulb
Pathos Theme Icon
Rhetoric and Ethics Theme Icon
...love—playing romantic music, pouring them wine, complimenting them, etc. The great Roman orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero, said that persuading people consists of three different steps: 1) stimulate their emotions; 2) change... (full context)
Chapter 9: Control the Mood: The Aquinas Maneuver
Pathos Theme Icon
Rhetoric and Ethics Theme Icon
...emotion will be more persuasive than one displaying strong emotion. This leads to one of Cicero’s key points: “when you argue emotionally, speak simply.” The senator Daniel Webster once prosecuted a... (full context)
Chapter 25: Give a Persuasive Talk: The Oldest Invention
Ethos Theme Icon
Pathos Theme Icon
Logos Theme Icon
...been talking about the basics of offense and defense. Now it’s time to talk about Cicero’s five canons of persuasion: “invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery.” There’s a deliberate order to... (full context)
Ethos Theme Icon
Pathos Theme Icon
Logos Theme Icon
Demonstrative vs. Deliberative Rhetoric Theme Icon
Rhetoric and Ethics Theme Icon
...have suggested that a persuader begin with ethos, then logos, and then finish with pathos. Cicero further suggested that a speaker begin with a brief, ethos-laden introduction, laying out the issue... (full context)
Ethos Theme Icon
Pathos Theme Icon
Demonstrative vs. Deliberative Rhetoric Theme Icon
Rhetoric and Ethics Theme Icon
...nervous as he walks to the town hall to deliver his speech. He remembers that Cicero, the greatest orator in history, once got so nervous for a speech that he ran... (full context)
Chapter 28: Run an Agreeable Country: Rhetoric’s Revival
Ethos Theme Icon
Pathos Theme Icon
Logos Theme Icon
Demonstrative vs. Deliberative Rhetoric Theme Icon
Rhetoric and Ethics Theme Icon
...The Founders idolized the Greeks and Romans—among the Founders, praising an orator as a “modern Cicero” was the highest compliment. Furthermore, one of the most popular plays in early Revolutionary society... (full context)