The Age of Innocence

The Age of Innocence

Mr. Sillerton Jackson Character Analysis

Mr. Jackson is one of the prominent members of New York society and he prides himself on knowing everything about everyone else in New York society, particularly scandals of the past and present. Mrs. Archer sometimes invites him to dinner to learn the latest gossip. He lives with his sister, Sophy.

Mr. Sillerton Jackson Quotes in The Age of Innocence

The The Age of Innocence quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Sillerton Jackson or refer to Mr. Sillerton Jackson. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Innocence vs. Experience Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of The Age of Innocence published in 1997.
Chapter 5 Quotes

“Living together? Well, why not? Who had the right to make her life over if she hadn’t? I’m sick of the hypocrisy that would bury alive a woman of her age if her husband prefers to live with harlots.”

He stopped and turned away angrily to light his cigar. “Women ought to be free—as free as we are,” he declared, making a discovery of which he was too irritated to measure the terrific consequences.

Related Characters: Newland Archer (speaker), Ellen Olenska, Mr. Sillerton Jackson
Page Number: 26
Explanation and Analysis:
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Mr. Sillerton Jackson Character Timeline in The Age of Innocence

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Sillerton Jackson appears in The Age of Innocence. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
...carries the highest authority about all matters of fashion. He gives his opera glass to Sillerton Jackson . Archer realizes that Lefferts exclaimed because another woman has entered Mrs. Mingott’s box, wearing... (full context)
Innocence vs. Experience Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Archer’s group turns to Mr. Jackson , who knows everything about New York families, such as who is connected to whom... (full context)
Chapter 5
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
The next evening, Sillerton Jackson comes to dinner at the Archers’ house. Mr. Jackson and his sister Sophy, who lives... (full context)
Innocence vs. Experience Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Archer is sure that Mr. Jackson doesn’t want him around at dinner, but he stays anyway. Everyone wants to talk about... (full context)
Innocence vs. Experience Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Mr. Jackson is visibly dissatisfied with the food, and he remarks that Archer’s grandfather loved a good... (full context)
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
...however, argues that Ellen shouldn’t have to hide just because she made a bad marriage. Mr. Jackson says there are rumors of worse, but Archer argues that the secretary with whom she’s... (full context)
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
...and Janey go to the drawing room, where they work on embroidery. Meanwhile, Archer and Mr. Jackson smoke cigars in the library. Mr. Jackson remarks that the secretary didn’t only help Ellen... (full context)
Chapter 6
Innocence vs. Experience Theme Icon
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Change and Progress Theme Icon
After Mr. Jackson leaves, Archer goes to his study, which feels very welcoming. He sits by the fire... (full context)
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
...only the most fashionable people of New York. Within two days, everyone except the Beauforts, Mr. Jackson , and his sister has refused the invitation. The notes carrying refusals don’t even include... (full context)
Chapter 13
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
...Beaufort gestures to him, and he goes to the box and sits down behind Ellen. Sillerton Jackson is telling Mrs. Beaufort about Mrs. Struthers’s last party. Ellen quietly asks whether Archer thinks... (full context)
Chapter 19
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
...the men sulking at having to dress up so early. Archer imagines Reggie Chivers and Sillerton Jackson speculating on the food to be served at the breakfast and the fashion of serving... (full context)
Chapter 26
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Archer and Sillerton Jackson retreat to the library. Mr. Jackson remarks that if Beaufort collapses, people will find out... (full context)
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Mr. Jackson says it’s a pity that Ellen refused to return to her husband, because she won’t... (full context)
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
Archer says that Ellen certainly won’t go back now, but Mr. Jackson seems to have been waiting for this. He says that Medora Manson’s money is in... (full context)
Chapter 32
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
Change and Progress Theme Icon
...der Luydens they need to help maintain the status quo. This evening, they have invited Sillerton Jackson , Mrs. Archer, Newland, and May to go see Faust. (full context)
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
American vs. Foreign Theme Icon
Mr. Jackson interjects that at the French court, moral standards were very lax. Ellen’s foreign upbringing might... (full context)
Chapter 33
The Failure of Marriage Theme Icon
The Rules of Society Theme Icon
American vs. Foreign Theme Icon
Change and Progress Theme Icon
...marrying Beaufort’s bastards. This last is taken as a bit much by the men present. Sillerton Jackson remarks to Archer that Lefferts is only saying such things to cover his own misdeeds. (full context)