The Art of Travel

The early 20th-century American artist Edward Hopper was famous for painting traveling places, from hotels and gas stations to trains and roadside cafeterias. To de Botton, who presents a series of these paintings in his second essay, Hopper’s work offers viewers a chance to explore their own grief and loneliness through subjects and environments that echo their sense of unbelonging.

Edward Hopper Quotes in The Art of Travel

The The Art of Travel quotes below are all either spoken by Edward Hopper or refer to Edward Hopper. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of The Art of Travel published in 2002.
Chapter 2 Quotes

The twenty-four-hour diner, the station waiting room and the motel are sanctuaries for those who have, for noble reasons, failed to find a home in the ordinary world—those whom Baudelaire might have dignified with the honorific poets.

Related Characters: Alain de Botton (speaker), Charles Baudelaire , Edward Hopper
Page Number: 51
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other The Art of Travel quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Get the entire The Art of Travel LitChart as a printable PDF.
The art of travel.pdf.medium

Edward Hopper Character Timeline in The Art of Travel

The timeline below shows where the character Edward Hopper appears in The Art of Travel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: On Traveling Places
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
...it matches his environment, and also because it reminds him of the American painter Edward Hopper, whose works “allow the viewer to witness an echo of his or her own grief”... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
Hopper actually read Baudelaire throughout his life, which de Botton finds understandable given their “shared interests... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
Hopper’s painting Automat (p. 50) depicts a woman drinking coffee alone at night, seemingly saddened, “self-conscious... (full context)
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
...with “a clinical white light” until it reaches a gas station in a clearing—this is Hopper’s 1940 painting Gas (p. 53). At the station, the manager seems to have gone out... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
Hopper saw a “dreaminess” in trains, where thought flows more freely and people can access memories... (full context)