The Art of Travel

Friedrich Nietzsche Character Analysis

A prominent 19th-century German philosopher whom Alain de Botton frequently quotes throughout his book. He argued that travel can be valuable because it allows people to learn information that they can use to enrich their own lives, rejected the notion that painters can ever merely reproduce the world exactly as it is, and appreciated Xavier de Maistre’s ability to “make much of little.”

Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes in The Art of Travel

The The Art of Travel quotes below are all either spoken by Friedrich Nietzsche or refer to Friedrich Nietzsche. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of The Art of Travel published in 2002.
Chapter 4 Quotes

The guidebook might have added, “and where there must be something wrong with the traveller who cannot agree.”

111

Page Number: 111
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Chapter 7 Quotes

‘Completely true to nature!’—what a lie:
How could nature ever be constrained into a picture?
The smallest bit of nature is infinite!
And so he paints what he likes about it.
And what does he like? He likes what he can paint!

Nietzsche 188

Related Characters: Friedrich Nietzsche (speaker), Alain de Botton , Vincent van Gogh
Page Number: 188
Explanation and Analysis:
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Friedrich Nietzsche Character Timeline in The Art of Travel

The timeline below shows where the character Friedrich Nietzsche appears in The Art of Travel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: On Curiosity
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
...he finds irrelevant. His learning only matters if it is “life-enhancing.” But German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche actually found this kind of learning more important than “sterile” factual quests for science. Nietzsche... (full context)
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
For instance, Nietzsche thought that a traveler could go to Italy and realize that “the Italian Renaissance had... (full context)
Chapter 7: On Eye-Opening Art
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
...features to highlight and disregard, for no painting can capture the entirety of reality, as Nietzsche knew all too well: “‘Completely true to nature’—what a lie: / How could nature ever... (full context)
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
De Botton sees this as a justifiable artistic choice, however, for—as Nietzsche said in the earlier quote from this chapter—art can never capture the entirety of reality.... (full context)
Chapter 9: On Habit
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
After reading de Maistre, Nietzsche remarked that “some people know how to manage their experiences” and learn to “become an... (full context)