The Art of Travel

That which is both new and valuable. Conventionally, the word is employed by Europeans identifying something that captivates them about non-European cultures, but Alain de Botton also uses it to describe his fascination with Amsterdam.

The Exotic Quotes in The Art of Travel

The The Art of Travel quotes below are all either spoken by The Exotic or refer to The Exotic. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of The Art of Travel published in 2002.
Chapter 3 Quotes

What we find exotic abroad may be what we hunger for in vain at home.

Related Characters: Alain de Botton (speaker), Gustave Flaubert
Page Number: 77
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Exotic Term Timeline in The Art of Travel

The timeline below shows where the term The Exotic appears in The Art of Travel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: On the Exotic
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
When he disembarks in the Amsterdam airport, de Botton is immediately fascinated by the exotic exit sign he sees overhead: the sign’s simplicity and peculiar Dutch vowel combinations give him... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
De Botton recognizes that “the word exotic has traditionally been attached to more colourful things than Dutch signs,” and notes that it... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
...a café, and then sets out on a walk around the city. He sees “the exotic” in the city’s brickwork, narrow apartment buildings, affinity for bicycles, and grid system, among other... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Expectations vs. Reality Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
The Receptive Self Theme Icon
In its “fugitive, trivial” sense, “exotic” often simply denotes the pleasure people take in novelty. But de Botton sees a “more... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
Art, Travel, and the Search for Happiness Theme Icon
...basket contains her groceries and includes a carton reading “Goodappletje.” While she would find nothing exotic about the image of herself, de Botton claims, he feels a need to understand everything... (full context)
The Familiar and the Foreign Theme Icon
The exoticism of a foreign country adds to attractive people’s appeal, de Botton argues, and perhaps one’s... (full context)