The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Reginald Little Character Analysis

Reginald is Malcolm’s younger brother who comes to live with him in Harlem. While he admires Malcolm, he also is unafraid to live his life in ways that diverge from Malcolm. Reginald leads Malcolm to the Nation of Islam, but is later isolated from both the Nation and his family for having an extramarital affair.

Reginald Little Quotes in The Autobiography of Malcolm X

The The Autobiography of Malcolm X quotes below are all either spoken by Reginald Little or refer to Reginald Little. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Ballantine Books edition of The Autobiography of Malcolm X published in 1992.
Chapter 2 Quotes

Eventually my mother suffered a complete breakdown, and the court orders were finally signed. They took her to the State Mental Hospital at Kalamazoo.

It was seventy-some miles from Lansing, about an hour and a half on the bus. A Judge McClellan in Lansing had authority over me and all of my brothers and sisters. We were "state children," court wards; he had the full say-so over us. A white man in charge of a black man's children! Nothing but legal, modern slavery—however kindly intentioned.

Related Characters: Malcolm X (speaker), Louise Little (Malcolm’s Mother), Reginald Little, Hilda Little, Philbert Little, Wilfred Little
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 10 Quotes

I was going through the hardest thing, also the greatest thing, for any human being to do; to accept that which is already within you, and around you.

Related Characters: Malcolm X (speaker), Reginald Little
Page Number: 167
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 11 Quotes

Let me tell you something: from then until I left that prison, in every free moment I had, if I was not reading in the library, I was reading on my bunk. You couldn't have gotten me out of books with a wedge. Between Mr. Muhammad's teachings, my correspondence, my visitors—usually Ella and Reginald—and my reading of books, months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned. In fact, up to then, I never had been so truly free in my life.

Related Characters: Malcolm X (speaker), Elijah Muhammad, Ella Little, Reginald Little
Page Number: 176
Explanation and Analysis:

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Reginald Little Character Timeline in The Autobiography of Malcolm X

The timeline below shows where the character Reginald Little appears in The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Nightmare
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
...His older siblings Wilfred, Hilda, and Philbert were born in Philadelphia, while his younger brother Reginald was born in Milwaukee. Earl had three children from a previous marriage as well: Ella,... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
...younger kids. Philbert and Malcolm, meanwhile, fight each other and anyone else they meet, with Reginald tagging along. Louise tries to find work as a housemaid, and she finds several positions... (full context)
Chapter 2: Mascot
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
...reputation is completely destroyed within the black community, but worst of all, his adoring brother Reginald simply doesn’t mention the fight at all. After training hard and going for a rematch... (full context)
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...in Lansing nearly every weekend. Hilda and Wilfred still live in the old house, while Reginald and the others are with various families in Lansing. Malcolm likes to give the younger... (full context)
Chapter 6: Detroit Red
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
One day after Malcolm comes back from a trip, Reginald is waiting for him at Sammy’s apartment. They get a room at the St. Nicholas... (full context)
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Reginald fills Malcolm in on the family. Wilfred is an instructor at a trade school, and... (full context)
Chapter 7: Hustler
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Reginald comes back on his ship one day, and this time, he decides to stay. He... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
Wanting to provide Reginald with a stable home, Malcolm starts to rent an apartment for $100 a month. At... (full context)
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Malcolm gets Reginald a hustle that will make him money but be risk-free—he gets him a license to... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Malcolm assumes that Reginald, like most black men at the time, will be interested in white women, but that... (full context)
Chapter 9: Caught
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Reginald comes to visit in Roxbury, after having returned to Harlem and discovering all the mess... (full context)
Chapter 10: Satan
Religion Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...to him about a new religion he’s found, the “natural religion for the black man.” Reginald sends him a separate letter, telling him that if he stops smoking cigarettes and doesn’t... (full context)
Religion Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
...seen his nasty reply to Philbert, his siblings (all new converts) have decided to send Reginald to talk with Malcolm. Reginald comes to see Malcolm, looking very well-groomed and discussing the... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
Allah, Reginald says, came to America and revealed himself to a man named Elijah. But there was... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
After Reginald leaves, Malcolm thinks through every white person he’s ever known: the state welfare people, the... (full context)
Religion Theme Icon
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To test Reginald’s statement about Masons, Malcolm approaches a Mason in the prison. He draws him a circle... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Reginald comes to visit again, and he finds a very attentive Malcolm waiting for him. Reginald... (full context)
Race and Racism in America Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
...Muhammad, who is described as a wise, gentle man—and a black man just like Malcolm. Reginald also explains that as a sign of submission to Allah, Muslims do not eat pork,... (full context)
Chapter 11: Saved
Religion Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
When Reginald comes to visit Malcolm, Malcolm tries to share some of his studying and learning with... (full context)
Religion Theme Icon
Family and Dysfunction Theme Icon
...same sins. But at the time, his letter sways Malcolm, and Malcolm no longer lets Reginald influence him in any way. (full context)
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Reginald continues to visit him, but Malcolm pays little heed to his conversation. Reginald’s appearance grows... (full context)
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Reginald later begins to hallucinate and then say strange things, like how he is the Prophet,... (full context)
Chapter 16: Out
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Malcolm remembers how he had rejected his brother Reginald because he had been “isolated” from the Muslim community for a sexual affair. He had... (full context)