The Blithedale Romance

by

Nathaniel Hawthorne

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Miles Coverdale Character Analysis

Coverdale, the story’s narrator and protagonist, is a Boston poet who becomes one of the founding members of the utopian agrarian community of Blithedale. As intellectuals, he and the other founders believe that laboring in nature will combat the evils of industrial society (such as prejudice and inequality) while stimulating their intellect and creativity. However, as their experiment progresses, their assumptions and motives begin to seem less pure. Coverdale misses the comforts of upper-class Boston, he realizes that hard labor makes him unable to write poetry, and he seems less interested in egalitarian utopia than in prying into the secrets of those around him. In general, he has a deep interest in human nature and he loves to observe people and speculate about their pasts and their feelings, which doesn’t always make him an empathetic or intuitive friend (in fact, his observations about people often lead him to incorrect conclusions). He is especially interested in his closest friends, Hollingsworth, Zenobia, and Priscilla, who have mysterious pasts and whose connections to one another are difficult to parse—later, he reveals that his obsession with them is motivated in large part by his love for Priscilla. Incredibly secretive himself, Coverdale never tells Priscilla (who marries Hollingsworth) of his feelings. Just as Blithedale is beginning to thrive, Hollingsworth asks Coverdale to help him co-opt the Blithedale community for his own philanthropic project, and Coverdale’s refusal leads him and Hollingsworth to fall out as friends. Feeling betrayed by Hollingsworth’s selfishness, Coverdale returns to Boston, where he continues to seek information about his friends’ pasts. On a trip back to Blithedale, he witnesses an argument between Zenobia, Priscilla, and Hollingsworth, after which Zenobia kills herself in grief over Hollingsworth loving Priscilla instead of her. As Zenobia unofficially led Blithedale, this is the end of their vision and idealism, and Coverdale returns to his solitary life in Boston, reflecting that the society—while a worthwhile daydream—was always doomed.

Miles Coverdale Quotes in The Blithedale Romance

The The Blithedale Romance quotes below are all either spoken by Miles Coverdale or refer to Miles Coverdale. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Self-Interest and Utopian Societies Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Blithedale Romance published in 1983.
Chapter 2 Quotes

Yet, after all, let us acknowledge it wiser, if not more sagacious, to follow out one’s day-dream to its natural consummation, although, if the vision have been worth the having, it is certain never to be consummated otherwise than by a failure. And what of that! Its airiest fragments, impalpable as they may be, will possess a value that lurks not in the most ponderous realities of any practicable scheme. They are not the rubbish of the mind. Whatever else I may repent of, therefore, let it be reckoned neither among my sins nor follies, that I once had faith and force enough to form generous hopes of the world’s destiny—yes!—and to do what in me lay for their accomplishment; even to the extent of quitting a warm fireside, flinging away a freshly lighted cigar, and travelling far beyond the strike of city-clocks, through a drifting snow-storm.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker)
Page Number: 10-11
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Chapter 6 Quotes

The most curious part of the matter was, that, long after my slight delirium had passed away—as long, indeed, as I continued to know this remarkable woman—her daily flower affected my imagination, though more slightly, yet in very much the same way. The reason must have been, that, whether intentionally on her part, or not, this favorite ornament was actually a subtile expression of Zenobia’s character.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia
Related Symbols: Zenobia’s Flowers
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:
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Then, also, as anybody could observe, the freedom of her deportment (though, to some tastes, it might commend itself as the utmost perfection of manner, in a youthful widow, or a blooming matron) was not exactly maidenlike. What girl had ever laughed as Zenobia did! What girl had ever spoken in her mellow tones! Her unconstrained and inevitable manifestation, I said often to myself, was that of a woman to whom wedlock had thrown wide the gates of mystery. Yet, sometimes, I strove to be ashamed of these conjectures. I acknowledged it as a masculine grossness—a sin of wicked interpretation, of which man is often guilty towards the other sex—thus to mistake the sweet, liberal, but womanly frankness of a noble and generous disposition. Still, it was of no avail to reason with myself, nor to upbraid myself. Pertinaciously the thought—‘Zenobia is a wife! Zenobia has lived, and loved! There is no folded petal, no latent dew-drop, in this perfectly developed rose!’—irresistibly that thought drove out all other conclusions, as often as my mind reverted to the subject.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia
Page Number: 47
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Chapter 8 Quotes

“Did you ever see a happy woman in your life? Of course, I do not mean a girl—like Priscilla, and a thousand others, for they are all alike, while on the sunny side of experience—but a grown woman. How can she be happy, after discovering that fate has assigned her but one single event, which she must contrive to make the substance of her whole life? A man has his choice of innumerable events.”

Related Characters: Zenobia (speaker), Miles Coverdale, Priscilla / The Veiled Lady
Page Number: 60
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Our labor symbolized nothing, and left us mentally sluggish in the dusk of the evening. Intellectual activity is incompatible with any large amount of bodily exercise. The yeoman and the scholar—the yeoman and the man of finest moral culture, though not the man of sturdiest sense and integrity—are two distinct individuals, and can never be melted or welded into one substance.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker)
Page Number: 66
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 9 Quotes

Thus, as my conscience has often whispered me, I did Hollingsworth a great wrong by prying into his character, and am perhaps doing him as great a one, at this moment, by putting faith in the discoveries which I seemed to make. But I could not help it. Had I loved him less, I might have used him better. He—and Zenobia and Priscilla, both for their own sakes and as connected with him—were separated from the rest of the Community, to my imagination, and stood forth as the indices of a problem which it was my business to solve.

Page Number: 69
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“For, little as we know of our life to come, we may be very sure, for one thing, that the good we aim at will not be attained. People never do get just the good they seek. If it come at all, it is something else, which they never dreamed of, and did not particularly want. Then, again, we may rest certain that our friends of to-day will not be our friends of a few years hence; but, if we keep one of them, it will be at the expense of the others—and, most probably, we shall keep none.”

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Priscilla / The Veiled Lady
Page Number: 75-76
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Chapter 12 Quotes

This hermitage was my one exclusive possession, while I counted myself a brother of the socialists. It symbolized my individuality, and aided me in keeping it inviolate.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker)
Page Number: 99
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Now, as I looked down from my upper region at this man and woman—outwardly so fair a sight, and wandering like two lovers in the wood—I imagined that Zenobia, at an earlier period of youth, might have fallen into the misfortune above indicated. And when her passionate womanhood, as was inevitable, had discovered its mistake, there had ensued the character of eccentricity and defiance, which distinguished the more public portion of her life.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia, Professor Westervelt
Page Number: 103
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Chapter 14 Quotes

“I hate to be ruled by my own sex; it excites my jealousy and wounds my pride. It is the iron sway of bodily force, which abases us, in our compelled submission. But, how sweet the free, generous courtesy, with which I would kneel before a woman-ruler!”

“Yes, if she were young and beautiful,” said Zenobia, laughing. “But how if she were sixty, and a fright?”

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia (speaker)
Page Number: 121
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Chapter 15 Quotes

It appeared, unless he over-estimated his own means, that Hollingsworth held it at his choice (and he did so choose) to obtain possession of the very ground on which we had planted our Community, and which had not yet been made irrevocably ours, by purchase. It was just the foundation that he desired. Our beginnings might readily be adapted to his great end.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Hollingsworth
Page Number: 131
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Chapter 19 Quotes

Even her characteristic flower, though it seemed to be still there, had undergone a cold and bright transfiguration; it was a flower exquisitely imitated in jeweller’s work, and imparting the last touch that transformed Zenobia into a work of art.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia
Related Symbols: Zenobia’s Flowers
Page Number: 163-164
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Chapter 20 Quotes

“Oh, this stale excuse of duty!” said Zenobia, in a whisper so full of scorn that it penetrated me like the hiss of a serpent. “I have often heard it before, from those who sought to interfere with me, and I know precisely what it signifies. Bigotry; self-conceit; an insolent curiosity; a meddlesome temper; a cold-blooded criticism, founded on a shallow interpretation of half-perceptions; a monstrous scepticism in regard to any conscience or any wisdom, except one’s own; a most irreverent propensity to thrust Providence aside, and substitute one’s self in its awful place—out of these, and other motives as miserable as these, comes your idea of duty!”

Related Characters: Zenobia (speaker), Miles Coverdale (speaker)
Page Number: 170
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Chapter 22 Quotes

Nor was her reputation seriously affected by the report. In fact, so great was her native power and influence, and such seemed the careless purity of her nature, that whatever Zenobia did was generally acknowledged as right for her to do. The world never criticised her so harshly as it does most women who transcend its rules. It almost yielded its assent when it beheld her stepping out of the common path, and asserting the more extensive privileges of her sex, both theoretically and by her practice. The sphere of ordinary womanhood was felt to be narrower than her development required.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia
Page Number: 189-190
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Chapter 23 Quotes

How strangely she had been betrayed! Blazoned abroad as a wonder of the world, and performing what were adjudged as miracles—in the faith of many, a seeress and a prophetess—in the harsher judgment of others, a mountebank—she had kept, as I religiously believe, her virgin reserve and sanctity of soul, throughout it all. Within that encircling veil, though an evil hand had flung it over her, there was as deep a seclusion as if this forsaken girl had, all the while, been sitting under the shadow of Eliot’s pulpit, in the Blithedale woods, at the feet of him who now summoned her to the shelter of his arms. And the true heart-throb of a woman’s affection was too powerful for the jugglery that had hitherto environed her.

Related Symbols: The Veil
Page Number: 203
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Chapter 25 Quotes

“Ah, this is very good!” said Zenobia, with a smile. “What strange beings you men are, Mr. Coverdale!—is it not so? It is the simplest thing in the world, with you, to bring a woman before your secret tribunals, and judge and condemn her, unheard, and then tell her to go free without a sentence. The misfortune is, that this same secret tribunal chances to be the only judgment-seat that a true woman stands in awe of, and that any verdict short of acquittal is equivalent to a death-sentence!”

Related Characters: Zenobia (speaker), Miles Coverdale, Hollingsworth
Page Number: 215
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 26 Quotes

“A moral? Why, this:--that, in the battlefield of life, the downright stroke, that would fall only on a man’s steel head-piece, is sure to light on a woman’s heart, over which she wears no breastplate, and whose wisdom it is, therefore, to keep out of the conflict. Or this:--that the whole universe, her own sex and yours, and Providence, or Destiny, to boot, make common cause against the woman who swerves one hair’s breadth out of the beaten track.”

Related Characters: Zenobia (speaker), Miles Coverdale
Page Number: 224
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“But I am weary of this place, and sick to death of playing at philanthropy and progress. Of all the varieties of mock-life, we have surely blundered into the very emptiest mockery, in our effort to establish the one true system. I have done with it […]. It was, indeed, a foolish dream! Yet it gave us some pleasant summer days and bright hopes, while they lasted. It can do no more; nor will it avail us to shed tears over a broken bubble.”

Related Characters: Zenobia (speaker), Miles Coverdale
Page Number: 227
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 28 Quotes

It was a woful thought, that a woman of Zenobia’s diversified capacity should have fancied herself irretrievably defeated on the broad battle-field of life, and with no refuge, save to fall on her own sword, merely because Love had gone against her. It is nonsense, and a miserable wrong—the result, like so many others, of masculine egotism—that the success or failure of woman’s existence should be made to depend wholly on the affections, and on one species of affection; while man has such a multitude of other chances, that this seems but an incident.

Related Characters: Miles Coverdale (speaker), Zenobia, Hollingsworth
Page Number: 241
Explanation and Analysis:
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Miles Coverdale Character Timeline in The Blithedale Romance

The timeline below shows where the character Miles Coverdale appears in The Blithedale Romance. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Old Moodie
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On the night before Coverdale goes to Blithedale, he goes to see the Veiled Lady. Coverdale explains that she’s one... (full context)
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A man calls out to Coverdale twice before Coverdale recognizes him. It’s Moodie, a mysterious old man who has a habit... (full context)
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Coverdale assures Moodie that he wants to help, but Moodie refuses to explain what he needs.... (full context)
Chapter 2: Blithedale
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Now that Coverdale is getting old and has white hairs in his mustache, he can’t imagine a cheerier... (full context)
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In the present, Coverdale says that the “better life” probably doesn’t look better now. It’s heroic to overcome doubt... (full context)
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At Blithedale, Coverdale trudges through the storm with four other men. Hollingsworth, he knows, has been delayed and... (full context)
Chapter 3: A Knot of Dreamers
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When Zenobia greets Coverdale, she expresses her love for his poetry and says she hopes he doesn’t plan to... (full context)
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...some women might prove more adept at fieldwork and some men more adept at housework. Coverdale says it’s too bad they can’t do away with some of these domestic duties altogether... (full context)
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...it is for people to work together than separately or in competition with each other. Coverdale says they shouldn’t be ashamed if all their plans turned to dust—for his own part,... (full context)
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...to enable the farm to compete with other vegetable sellers in Boston markets. To himself, Coverdale realizes that Silas’s points highlight how the group stands in hostility to society rather than... (full context)
Chapter 4: The Supper-table
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...and unity. Those belonging to the upper classes consider this a successful first step, but Coverdale knows it’s more difficult for the laborers because they must sense the condescension. All along,... (full context)
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After an awkward silence, Coverdale comments on how picturesque the farmhouse must look with the fire blazing inside. Zenobia says... (full context)
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...the girl says her name is Priscilla, but she’s unwilling to share her last name. Coverdale repeats this name to himself until he can’t imagine her having any other. Zenobia says... (full context)
Chapter 5: Until Bedtime
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That night, Silas works on a pair of shoes and Mrs. Foster knits. Coverdale notices how trustingly Priscilla surrenders herself to Zenobia’s care. Coverdale theorizes that Priscilla worships Zenobia... (full context)
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...making a unique type of purse that seems impossible to open without being shown how. Coverdale (who has a purse just like it) thinks this reflects Priscilla’s own mystery. Occasionally Priscilla... (full context)
Chapter 6: Coverdale’s Sick-chamber
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...next day, as Silas warned, the call to wake up comes early. From his bed, Coverdale listens to everyone get up and get ready, including Hollingsworth saying his prayers (Coverdale is... (full context)
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Coverdale says that, even though most men are indifferent towards people who are seriously ill, Hollingsworth... (full context)
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Even though Hollingsworth tells Coverdale that he’s not dangerously ill, Coverdale is mortified to realize that he’s getting better instead... (full context)
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Coverdale obsesses over the thought that Zenobia has been married. She is young, wealthy, and beautiful,... (full context)
Chapter 7: The Convalescent
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When Coverdale begins to recover from his illness, he asks about Priscilla. A letter that should have... (full context)
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During his convalescence, Coverdale reads every available book at Blithedale, including works by Fourier. Coverdale is impressed with these... (full context)
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In retrospect, Coverdale thinks that during this time Hollingsworth was going mad. He became monomaniacal, spending all of... (full context)
Chapter 8: A Modern Arcadia
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Coverdale leaves his bed in May. He wanders outside, toward the sound of Zenobia and someone... (full context)
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...up to her, but even then, she seems despondent. Finally recovered and out of bed, Coverdale feels like a new man—his illness has helped him get over old prejudices and follies.... (full context)
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...ridiculous mistakes (like that they dug up the corn and nurtured weeds all summer), but Coverdale recognizes it as basic envy and malice. The danger wasn’t that they’d fail to become... (full context)
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Zenobia arrives at a similar conclusion. When Coverdale returns one day, she asks if he’s written any poetry, like Burns when he reaped... (full context)
Chapter 9: Hollingsworth. Zenobia, Priscilla
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Coverdale writes that it’s not good to spend too much time studying individual people, especially because... (full context)
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...They worship their ideal and fail to recognize when their initial benevolence transforms into egoism. Coverdale admits that he might be exaggerating, but his words illustrate Hollingsworth’s dangerous tendencies. For his... (full context)
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...plays pranks on others, but they all love her and readily forgive all her mischief. Coverdale writes that Priscilla’s abundant happiness made him sad, and he worried that she’d use it... (full context)
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...running around for the night, so she contentedly sits at his feet on the porch. Coverdale wonders what Priscilla sees in Hollingsworth but enjoys the image of the two sitting together.... (full context)
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...gorgeous view of Blithedale and everyone believes they plan to build a cottage together there. Coverdale tries to find out if this is true by mentioning that he’d choose a different... (full context)
Chapter 10: A Visitor from Town
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One day while Hollingsworth and Coverdale are eating lunch under some trees after hoeing potatoes, they spot someone coming up the... (full context)
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Hollingsworth playfully scolds Coverdale, saying that surely Coverdale has already figured out that Priscilla makes the purses. Hollingsworth tells... (full context)
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...says they might catch them doing just that and leads Moodie towards the farmhouse. Alone, Coverdale thinks that Moodie doesn’t seem out of his mind like Hollingsworth said. In fact, Coverdale... (full context)
Chapter 11: The Wood-path
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One day, Coverdale decides to take a day off to wander alone through the forest and refresh himself.... (full context)
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Coverdale immediately hates the man, but he still feels ashamed of his rudeness and asks what... (full context)
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The sight of the gold bar makes Coverdale laugh—he thinks that the man might have a lot of fake body parts. When they... (full context)
Chapter 12: Coverdale’s Hermitage
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Early on in Blithedale, Coverdale discovered that a wild grapevine had grown up the tree and created a perfectly hidden... (full context)
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Up in his hermitage, Coverdale soaks in the smells of the forest, but he is suddenly overwhelmed by the feeling... (full context)
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...but he is likely writing it off as feminine absurdity that no man can understand. Coverdale wonders how many women have ruined their lives by marrying men like that—marrying them and... (full context)
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Coverdale wonders if fate will lead Zenobia and Westervelt to stop under his tree so he... (full context)
Chapter 13: Zenobia’s Legend
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...Priscilla to stand in front of her so Zenobia can draw inspiration from Priscilla’s eyes. Coverdale doubts that he can quite do the story justice on paper, but he’ll try. The... (full context)
Chapter 14: Eliot’s Pulpit
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...and others enjoy the scenery around Blithedale or take long naps in the barn. Hollingsworth, Coverdale, Zenobia, and Priscilla make a habit of going to a strange nearby rock formation they... (full context)
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Zenobia sees Coverdale smile and says it’s indicative of shallow thought. She predicts that as soon as women... (full context)
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Coverdale says it’s Zenobia who “rate[s] womanhood low.” He says that he never like bearded male... (full context)
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Priscilla contentedly smiles up at Hollingsworth, happily absorbing everything he says. Coverdale knows the type of womanhood Hollingsworth idealizes is at his feet. He turns to Zenobia,... (full context)
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...gets up and heads back. Priscilla skips on ahead, followed by Hollingsworth and Zenobia, and Coverdale in the back. Coverdale sees Zenobia press Hollingsworth’s hand to her breast. Coverdale recognizes a... (full context)
Chapter 15: A Crisis
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As the summer wears on and Coverdale adjusts to life in Blithedale, he begins to look forward to the future and the... (full context)
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Hollingsworth says he neither believes in nor values Coverdale’s expectations for Blithedale and insists that Coverdale should try to be serious and join him... (full context)
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Hollingsworth cuts the discussion short and says he wants an answer: will Coverdale join Hollingsworth’s cause and thus finally do something meaningful with his life or not. Hollingsworth... (full context)
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Coverdale asks Hollingsworth what’s supposed to happen to Priscilla. Suddenly Hollingsworth looks fierce and asks why... (full context)
Chapter 16: Leave-takings
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A few days after his argument with Hollingsworth, Coverdale announces that he’s going to leave for a holiday. This upsets Silas, who doesn’t want... (full context)
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In an aside, Coverdale writes that there are so many opinions on the world—what it should be, what it... (full context)
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Zenobia tells Coverdale that she’s thought about confiding in him, but she won’t because he’s so young and... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Hotel
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Coverdale stays in a hotel in the city far away from where he used to spend... (full context)
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Coverdale soon becomes familiar with the range of houses outside his window. His room faces the... (full context)
Chapter 18: The Boarding-house
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Coverdale sleeps in after a late night at the theater. His sleep was tormented by dreams... (full context)
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...still has an exotic flower in her hair. She walks away from the window, but Coverdale expects that she’ll return because she’s probably pacing through the room instead of taking her... (full context)
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Coverdale watches Zenobia and Westervelt talk to each other. Zenobia’s gestures and other body language indicate... (full context)
Chapter 19: Zenobia’s Drawing-room
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For the rest of the day, Coverdale wonders why Zenobia and Priscilla are in town instead of at Blithedale. He feels insulted... (full context)
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A servant leads Coverdale to Zenobia’s rooms. When he enters Zenobia laughs, but Coverdale detects some scorn in her... (full context)
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In the next instant, Coverdale realizes that it’s only right for Zenobia to make herself as beautiful as she wants,... (full context)
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Coverdale coldly tells Zenobia that her description of single-minded people reminds him of Hollingsworth and his... (full context)
Chapter 20: They Vanish
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Priscilla immediately answers Zenobia’s call and comes into the room. This is somewhat surprising to Coverdale, who initially thought Zenobia might prevent him from talking to Priscilla. However, Priscilla’s complete lack... (full context)
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Zenobia wonders why Coverdale never considered falling in love with Priscilla, insinuating that social class had something to do... (full context)
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Coverdale is on the verge of leaving after Zenobia’s outburst, but he catches sight of Priscilla... (full context)
Chapter 21: An Old Acquaintance
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After Coverdale’s interview with Zenobia and Priscilla, he admits that it would be reasonable for him to... (full context)
Chapter 22: Fauntleroy
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A few months after Priscilla’s departure, Zenobia goes to Fauntleroy’s rooms. Coverdale doesn’t know the details of their conversation, but he presents what he believes passed between... (full context)
Chapter 23: A Village-hall
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Over the next few weeks, Coverdale struggles to put his memories of Blithedale and his concern for Zenobia, Hollingsworth, and Priscilla... (full context)
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The audience calls for the show to start and a bearded man enters the stage. Coverdale recognizes Professor Westervelt; he shudders and asks Hollingsworth where Priscilla is but gets no answer.... (full context)
Chapter 24: The Masqueraders
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Two days later Coverdale decides to go back to Blithedale. It is a beautiful day and the closer Coverdale... (full context)
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Coverdale climbs into his hermitage to get a better view of the farm, but he doesn’t... (full context)
Chapter 25: The Three Together
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...like a queen, but one who’s been dethroned or is on trial for her life. Coverdale realizes that the three have reached some kind of crisis and immediately wishes he was... (full context)
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...her judge, jury, and accuser. She suggests that they should both plead their cases to Coverdale and let him judge them. Hollingsworth says he never meant to judge Zenobia except that... (full context)
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...that he’s all self and disguises his conceit with self-deception. She accuses him of throwing Coverdale away for not joining his project and doing the same to her now that she’s... (full context)
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...she has won, and Hollingsworth is waiting for her. Priscilla gasps out that they’re sisters. Coverdale understands this as Priscilla offering herself to Zenobia, but Zenobia takes it another way and... (full context)
Chapter 26: Zenobia and Coverdale
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Zenobia forgets that Coverdale is there, but he decides to stay and witness her grief. He draws an analogy... (full context)
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Coverdale says this moral is too stern, but Zenobia changes the subject and says Hollingsworth has... (full context)
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While Zenobia talks, Coverdale admires how beautiful she looks. She notices his look and gets pleasure from it. She... (full context)
Chapter 27: Midnight
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Around midnight Coverdale goes to the farmhouse and calls to Hollingsworth to come out. Coverdale is alarmed by... (full context)
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Silas, Coverdale, and Hollingsworth hurry down to the water. After waking up, Coverdale felt himself drawn to... (full context)
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Coverdale, Hollingsworth, and Silas make a bier to carry Zenobia’s body back. The thought occurs to... (full context)
Chapter 28: Blithedale-pasture
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There is no cemetery in Blithedale, so they must discuss where to bury Zenobia. Coverdale suggests Eliot’s Pulpit, but Hollingsworth insists that they bury her on the hillside where they... (full context)
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Coverdale says nothing Westervelt just described would’ve satisfied Zenobia’s heart. Westervelt contemptuously says she would have... (full context)
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Coverdale worries about Priscilla but knows that her heart only has room for a single all-consuming... (full context)
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Coverdale says the moral of Hollingsworth’s life is that when a person devotes their entire being... (full context)
Chapter 29: Mile’s Coverdale’s Confession
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Coverdale notes that he hasn’t been a very prominent figure in his own story—he has very... (full context)