The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

by

William Kamkwamba

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind can help.

Everything you need
for every book you read.

"Sooo much more helpful than SparkNotes. The way the content is organized
and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive."
Get LitCharts A+
  • Easy-to-use guides to literature, poetry, literary terms, and more
  • Super-helpful explanations and citation info for over 30,000 important quotes
  • Unrestricted access to all 50,000+ pages of our website and mobile app
Get LitCharts A+
Green maize, somewhat similar to American corn, the first edible crop of the harvest season. Dowe is often cooked in the field as a treat for the start of harvest time after the hunger season in Malawi.
Get the entire The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind PDF

Dowe Term Timeline in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

The timeline below shows where the term Dowe appears in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 8
Malawian Culture and African Community Theme Icon
...crop continues to ripen. William estimates twenty more days before the first green maize, called dowe, will be ready to eat. He dreams about the sweet taste of this plant, likening... (full context)
The Business of Survival Theme Icon
Malawian Culture and African Community Theme Icon
Science vs. Superstition and Magic Theme Icon
At the beginning of March, William begins checking the dowe to see if it is ready. Finally, the crop is ripe and William races back... (full context)
The Business of Survival Theme Icon
Malawian Culture and African Community Theme Icon
As dowe and pumpkins bring people back from the edge of starvation, the village begins to reawaken.... (full context)
Chapter 9
Education and Entrepreneurship Theme Icon
During the famine, most students stopped going to school, but the arrival of dowe and pumpkins means that the village has enough energy to resume classes. Sadly, William still... (full context)