The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

Sing’anga Term Analysis

A Malawian witch doctor who can perform curses on people or give them magical strength.

Sing’anga Quotes in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

The The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind quotes below are all either spoken by Sing’anga or refer to Sing’anga. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Rebirth, Recycling, and Reinvention Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the William Morrow edition of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind published in 2010.
Chapter 2 Quotes

My first and only experience with magic had left me with a sore eye and hands that throbbed from bad medicine. With my luck, I thought, they'll probably become infected and fall off.

Related Characters: William Kamkwamba (speaker), Shabani
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sing’anga Term Timeline in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

The timeline below shows where the term Sing’anga appears in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Science vs. Superstition and Magic Theme Icon
...has stolen a bag of bubblegum. William is scared that this man will send a sing’anga (witch doctor) after him for eating the bubble gum. (full context)
Chapter 2
Science vs. Superstition and Magic Theme Icon
Phiri has a nephew named Shabani who boasts that he is a sing’anga who can perform mangolomera. William and Gilbert don’t believe Shabani, but they cannot be sure.... (full context)
Chapter 13
Science vs. Superstition and Magic Theme Icon
...HIV and witches claiming to correct any “bewitchment” keep people from seeking real medical treatment. Sing’angas treat AIDS with roots and charge outrageous prices without solving anything. There is also harsh... (full context)
Education and Entrepreneurship Theme Icon
Science vs. Superstition and Magic Theme Icon
...more people in Malawi get tested and treated for HIV in clinics instead of with sing’angas. (full context)