The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov

by

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Brothers Karamazov can help.
The patriarch of the Karamazov clan, Fyodor is the father of Dmitri, Ivan, and Alexei and the probable father of his “lackey,” Smerdyakov. He starts out poor but later becomes a “very small landowner,” and it is only after his death that the extent of his wealth is made known. Regarded as an “old buffoon,” Fyodor is a morally depraved and greedy man, known for having made his fortune partly by eating at other people’s tables. He has been married twice—first, to Adelaida Ivanovna Miusov, then to Sofia Ivanovna. Dmitri Fyodorovich is his eldest son by Adelaida Ivanovna, while Ivan and Alexei are the children that Fyodor had with Sofia Ivanovna, and Smerdyakov was conceived as a result of an encounter that he likely had with Lizaveta Smerdyashchaya. Described as “muddleheaded,” “worthless and depraved,” Fyodor is a self-indulgent sensualist who likes to get drunk frequently and participates in orgies at his home—a practice that he continues while married. Three or four years after Sofia dies, he leaves town for southern Russia and lives there for several years. In middle-age, Fyodor looks bloated with “long, fleshy bags under his eternally insolent, suspicious, and leering little eyes.” He has a fat and wrinkled little face and a large Adam’s apple that is “fleshy and oblong like a purse” and hangs “below his sharp chin.” His lips are plump, and he has “black, almost decayed teeth.” His nose is thin and “noticeably hooked”—a feature Fyodor believes makes him look like “an ancient Roman patrician of the decadent period.” He is both sentimental and wicked and expresses fears of being dragged off to hell on hooks. Dmitri nicknames his father “Aesop” or “Pierrot” after the sad, stock figure in French pantomime. Fyodor believes that he is in love with Grushenka and competes with Dmitri for the younger woman’s affections. He is murdered at his home as a result of Smerdyakov bludgeoning him to death with a paperweight. He leaves behind one hundred and twenty thousand roubles for his sons to inherit.

Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov Quotes in The Brothers Karamazov

The The Brothers Karamazov quotes below are all either spoken by Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov or refer to Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of The Brothers Karamazov published in 1990.
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 8 Quotes

“He ran there, went up to the window […] ‘Grushenka,’ he called, ‘Grushenka, are you here?’ He called her, but he didn’t want to lean out the window, he didn’t want to move away from me […] because he was very afraid of me [….] ‘But there she is,’ I said (I went up to the window and leaned all the way out), ‘there she is in the bushes, smiling to you, see?’ He suddenly believed it, he just started shaking, because he really was very much in love with her, sir, and he leaned all the way out the window. Then I grabbed that same cast-iron paperweight, the one on his desk […] and I swung and hit him from behind on the top of the head with the corner of it.”

Page Number: 629
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 6 Quotes

“Gentlemen of the jury,” the prosecutor began, “the present case has resounded throughout Russia. But what, one might think, is so surprising, what is so especially horrifying about it? For us, for us especially? We’re so used to all that! And here is the real horror, that such dark affairs have almost ceased to horrify us! It is this, and not the isolated crime of one individual or another, that should horrify us: that we are so used to it. Where lie the reasons for our indifference, our lukewarm attitude towards such affairs, such signs of the times, which prophesy for us an unenviable future? In our cynicism, in an early exhaustion of mind and imagination in our society, so young and yet so prematurely decrepit? In our moral principles, shattered to their foundations, or, finally, in the fact that we, perhaps, are not even possessed of such moral principles at all?”

Page Number: 693
Explanation and Analysis:

“For now we are either horrified or pretend that we are horrified, while, on the contrary, relishing the spectacle, like lovers of strong, eccentric sensations that stir our cynical and lazy idleness, or, finally, like little children waving the frightening ghosts away, and hiding our heads under the pillow until the frightening vision is gone, so as to forget it immediately afterwards in games and merriment. But should not we, too, some day begin to live soberly and thoughtfully; should not we, too, take a look at ourselves as a society; should not we, too, understand at least something of our social duty, or at least begin to understand? A great writer of the previous epoch, in the finale of the greatest of his works, personifying all of Russia as a bold Russian troika galloping towards an unknown goal, exclaims: ‘Ah, troika, bird-troika, who invented you!—and in proud rapture adds that all nations respectfully stand aside for this troika galloping by at breakneck speed.”

Page Number: 695
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 12 Quotes

“I visited Smerdyakov [….] His health was weak […] but his character, his heart—oh, no, he was not at all such a weak man as the prosecution has made him out to be. I especially did not find any timidity in him [….] As for guilelessness, there was nothing of the sort […] I found a terrible mistrustfulness in him, behind a mask of naivety, and a mind capable of contemplating quite a lot.”

Page Number: 738
Explanation and Analysis:

“I gathered some information: he hated his origin, was ashamed of it, and gnashed his teeth when he recalled that he was ‘descended from Stinking Lizaveta.’ He was irreverent towards the servant Grigory and his wife, who had been his childhood benefactors. He cursed Russia and laughed at her. He dreamed of going to France and remaking himself as a Frenchman. He used to talk about it often and said that he only lacked the means to do so. It seems to me that he loved no one but himself, and his respect for himself was peculiarly high [….] Considering himself (and there are facts to support it) the illegitimate son of Fyodor Pavlovich, he might very well detest his position as compared with that of his master’s legitimate children: everything goes to them […] to them all the rights, to them the inheritance, while he is just a cook.”

Page Number: 738
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue, Chapter 2 Quotes

Thus they prattled to each other, and their talk was frantic, almost senseless, and perhaps also not even truthful, but at that moment everything was truth, and they both utterly believed what they were saying. “Katya,” Mitya suddenly exclaimed, “do you believe I killed him? I know you don’t believe it now, but then…when you were testifying…Did you, did you really believe it!” “I did not believe it then either! I never believed it! I hated you, and suddenly persuaded myself, for that moment…While I was testifying…I persuaded myself and believed it…and as soon as I finished testifying, I stopped believing it again. You must know all that. I forgot that I came here to punish myself!” she said with some suddenly quite new expression, quite like her prattling of love just a moment before.

Page Number: 766
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Brothers Karamazov LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Brothers Karamazov PDF

Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov Character Timeline in The Brothers Karamazov

The timeline below shows where the character Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov appears in The Brothers Karamazov. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 1: Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov 
Family Theme Icon
Alexei Fyodorovich Karamazov is the third son of the local landowner, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov—a “muddleheaded” man who... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Immediately after their marriage, Adelaida realizes that she feels contempt for Fyodor, who “filched” twenty-five thousand roubles in cash from her and tries to have the little... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Soon after Adelaida’s departure, Fyodor sets up “a regular harem” in his home and drinks constantly. During his intermissions, he... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 2: The First Son Sent Packing
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor abandons three-year-old Dmitri, leaving him in the care of his servant, Grigory. This isn’t out... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...of Dmitri’s existence, he expresses interest in taking responsibility for the child’s upbringing and tells Fyodor so. Years later, Pyotr would recall that Fyodor looked at him as though he had... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Dmitri is the only one of Fyodor’s three sons who grows up thinking that he’ll come into some property. He never finishes... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor senses that Dmitri is frivolous and impatient. He exploits this to his advantage, giving him... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 3: Second Marriage, Second Children
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor marries for a second time to Sofia Ivanovna. The marriage lasts for about eight years.... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...“terrible hysterical fits.” Nevertheless, she bears Ivan in the first year of her marriage to Fyodor, and Alexei three years later. Alexei is four when Sofia dies, but he remembers his... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
One day, Ivan appeared at Fyodor’s house and lives with him for a couple of months. The pair “[get] along famously.”... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 4: The Third Son, Alyosha
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...very talkative due to “some inner preoccupation.” He accepts everything “without the least condemnation.” When Fyodor’s antics are too much to bear, he simply retires quietly from his presence, never expressing... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...decides that had to see his father. He is also looking for his mother’s grave. Fyodor, however, is unable to show Alexei his mother’s grave because he never visited it after... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...says that the monks are ready to accept him as a novice. Alexei asks for Fyodor’s consent, and he agrees. Fyodor says that Alexei can pray for sinners like him. Fyodor... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 5: Elders
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
While Dmitri and Fyodor are arguing over the inheritance and property accounts, Alexei suggests that they all get together... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...offend the elder. Ivan and Pyotr Alexandrovich, he figures, are only agreeing out of curiosity. Fyodor, he thinks, is only coming to engage in “some buffoonery and theatrics.” He fears any... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 1: They Arrive at the Monastery
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Pyotr Fomich Kalganov, who is friendly with Alexei. In “a very ancient” but “roomy” carriage, Fyodor Pavlovich arrives with Ivan Fyodorovich. Dmitri Fyodorovich is late. An elderly gentleman with “sweet little... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...with him at one o’clock, after their visit to the hermitage. He also invites Maximov. Fyodor happily agrees, as does Pyotr Alexandrovich, though the latter is not pleased to share company... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Pyotr Alexandrovich warns Fyodor to behave himself during the visit to the Father Superior. When they arrive at the... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...Zosima has his cell is “wooden, one-storied, with a front porch” and “surrounded with flowers.” Fyodor asks if the house looked like this during the time of Varsonofy, the previous elder,... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 2: The Old Buffoon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...monks bow deeply at each other, touching the ground with their fingers. Pyotr Alexandrovich and Fyodor also bow deeply. Pyotr, however, dislikes the elder, whose withered face and small eyes displease... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
When the clock chimes, Fyodor mentions that Dmitri still hasn’t arrived and notes that he, on the other hand, always... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Fyodor throws himself down onto his knees and asks Zosima what he should do to “inherit... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 6: Why Is Such a Man Alive!
Family Theme Icon
...be at one. Dmitri then turns to his father and bows to him as well. Fyodor responds in kind. Dmitri then leans forward to listen to the conversation that he interrupted. (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor says that Dmitri owes him several thousand roubles. He tells Zosima how Dmitri got “one... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...went to Grushenka and encouraged her to take over Dmitri’s promissory notes, which are in Fyodor’s possession, and sue him to have him imprisoned—that is, as a deterrent for Dmitri bothering... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor says that, if Dmitri weren’t his son, he’d challenge him to a duel. Dmitri looks... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 8: Scandal
Family Theme Icon
...Ivan enter the Father Superior’s rooms, Pyotr begins to feel ashamed of his anger toward Fyodor. He decides to “seduce them with amiability” to distinguish himself from Fyodor. He also decides... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...takes it away before he can do so. Pyotr Alexandrovich then apologizes for arriving without Fyodor who, he says, “felt obliged” to skip dinner, due to quarreling with Dmitri in Father... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Meanwhile, while getting into “his rattling carriage” at the inn, Fyodor has a change of heart. He decides to finish what he started at the monastery... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Pyotr Alexandrovich turns to Pyotr Kalganov and says that they’re leaving. Fyodor prompts him to stay so that he can finish what he wants to say. He... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor pounds a fist on the dining table “in a fit of sham emotion.” He talks... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
 Fyodor says that he’s going to use his “parental authority” to take Alexei away from the... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 1: In the Servants’ Quarters
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor’s house is far from the center of town but not on the outskirts. It’s a... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Grigory made the decision to stay with Fyodor after the liberation of the serfs due to his “unquestionable influence over his master.” Grigory... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 2: Stinking Lizaveta
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...to regard such a creature as a woman. The group agreed that it was impossible. Fyodor Pavlovich was alone among them in declaring that it was possible to see her womanly... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Long after this episode, Fyodor swore that he rejoined his companions. No one knows for certain whether or not he... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 3: The Confession of an Ardent Heart. In Verse.
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...gazebo. Dmitri says that he wanted to send Alexei—“an angel”—to both Katerina Ivanovna and to Fyodor on his behalf. He remembers that Katerina sent for Alexei and wrote him a letter,... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 5: The Confession of an Ardent Heart. “Heels Up”
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...money, but Alexei is sure that the old man won’t give it. Dmitri insists that Fyodor owes him something for making a hundred thousand out of his mother’s twenty-eight thousand dowry.... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor has sent word to Grushenka to come to him. Dmitri is currently staying in “a... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...that he’ll see her, burst in, and stop it. He says that he would kill Fyodor, which shocks Alexei. Dmitri then becomes unsure about the prospect of killing his father, but... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 6: Smerdyakov
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
When Alexei enters his father’s house, Fyodor is excited to see him. He invites his youngest son to sit down for coffee.... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor notes that Smerdyakov, whom he calls “Balaam’s ass,” has started to talk and is quite... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...blow on Smerdyakov’s cheek. A week later, Smerdyakov “had the falling sickness” (epilepsy). This caused Fyodor to change his opinion of the boy, whom he formerly regarded with relative indifference. Suddenly,... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor also forbade further instruction. Then, one day, when Smerdyakov was about fifteen, Fyodor notices the... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...dinner, Smerdyakov has become particularly discerning and studies his food before eating it. This prompts Fyodor to send Smerdyakov to Moscow to train as a cook. Smerdyakov spends a few years... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...women as much as men. He also seems to be having more epileptic attacks, which Fyodor finds curious. He says that he wishes Smerdyakov would get married, and that he could... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor is convinced of Smerdyakov’s honesty. Once, when he dropped three hundred-rouble bank notes in the... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 7: Disputation
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Smerdyakov tells Grigory and Fyodor about a Russian soldier who was captured by Asians and forced “on pain of agonizing... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...never baptized, so he’s not a Christian anyway. Grigory is dumbfounded by Smerdyakov’s speech, while Fyodor bursts “into shrill laughter.” (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Fyodor shrieks for Smerdyakov to stop speaking so that he can ask him if he really... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Fyodor asserts that people are unbelievers “out of carelessness” and because God has given people little... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 8: Over the Cognac
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
After the dispute ends, Fyodor sends the servants out. He goes on to say that, “generally speaking,” Russian peasants like... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
Fyodor tells Alexei how he’d like to “put an end to that little monastery of [his].”... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor then asks Ivan if there is a God. Ivan says that there isn’t. He then... (full context)
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Fyodor says that hanging would be too good for the man who invented God. Ivan insists... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...hall along with some “furious shouting.” The door opens and Dmitri rushes into the room. Fyodor goes to Ivan “in terror,” clutching at him for safety. He's afraid that Dmitri has... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 9: The Sensualists
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...hits Grigory “with all his strength.” Grigory collapses, allowing Dmitri to go through the door. Fyodor accuses Dmitri of trying to steal money from his bedroom. Breaking away from Ivan, who’s... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Ivan and Grigory help Fyodor into an armchair. His face is bloody, but Dmitri gives him “a hateful glance” as... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...a walk in the yard because he feels a headache coming on. Alexei goes to Fyodor’s room and sits with him for about an hour. Fyodor opens his eyes, gazes silently... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor then asks Alexei to go to Grushenka and find out if she wants to be... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Alexei tell Katerina that he’s “bowing out.” Ivan concludes that Grushenka is “a beast,” that Fyodor must be kept at home, and that Dmitri can’t be allowed into the house. (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...death. He asks Alexei if he thinks that, like Dmitri, he’d be capable of killing Fyodor, whom he calls “Aesop.” Alexei is shocked by the question. Ivan is flattered by his... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 10: The Two Together
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
As Alexei leaves Fyodor’s house, he wonders how things will end between his father, his brother, and “this terrible... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Alexei tells Katerina Ivanovna about the scene that just took place between Dmitri and Fyodor. Alexei is sure that Dmitri has gone to “that woman” (Grushenka). Katerina nervously says that... (full context)
Part 2: Book 4, Chapter 2: At His Father’s
Family Theme Icon
Alexei first visits his father’s house. He wonders why Fyodor didn’t want Ivan to know about this visit. Marfa Ignatievna opens the gate for Alexei... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor says that Ivan left because he’s trying to win over Katerina Ivanovna, and that’s also... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Alexei tells his father that he seems “irritable” and advises Fyodor to go lie down. Fyodor says that he thought about filing charges against Dmitri, but... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fyodor then says that Ivan won’t go to Chermashnya, which he thinks is further proof that... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Alexei murmurs that he’ll ask Dmitri on Fyodor’s behalf, but suggests that the plan would be more successful if Fyodor offered three thousand... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 2: Smerdyakov with a Guitar
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...they had been subjected by the French under Napoleon. He says that he agrees with Fyodor’s assessment that the Russians “need thrashing,” though Fyodor and his children are madmen. He expresses... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 6: A Rather Obscure One for the Moment
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Ivan goes to his father’s house, feeling anguished. He wonders if he hates Fyodor. He then wonders if he’s bothered by his conversation with Alexei. Ivan reaches his father’s... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Ivan wants to curse Smerdyakov but, instead, asks him if Fyodor is “asleep or awake.” He’s asleep, Smerdyakov says. The lackey talks about how both Fyodor... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...anyone. Smerdyakov fears that he’ll be regarded as an accomplice if Dmitri does something to Fyodor. He told Dmitri about the knocking signals that he and Fyodor created to inform the... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...let Dmitri in. Smerdyakov says that he would never tell Grigory about the signals without Fyodor’s permission. Anyway, both Grigory and Marfa Ignatievna would probably be asleep anyway. (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...to be his own money. He says that it’s also possible that Grushenka will marry Fyodor, which will rob all three brothers of their inheritance of one hundred and twenty thousand... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 7: “It’s Always Interesting to Talk with an Intelligent Man”
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
When Ivan enters the house, Fyodor appears in a hurry to tell him something. However, Fyodor then turns and disappears back... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...father “affably” and announces that he’s leaving for Moscow in an hour and “for good.” Fyodor listens but expresses no grief or surprise. He then asks Ivan to stop off at... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Ivan suggests that the priest settle things with Lyagavy. Fyodor says that won’t work because the priest “has no eye for business.” Also, Lyagavy is... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Once again, Ivan says that he has no time, and, once again, Fyodor asks Ivan to do his father a favor. Ivan says that he’ll decide whether or... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...Ivan then decides not to go to Chermashnya and asks one of them to see Fyodor and tell him that he didn’t go. Ivan gives the man, whose name is Mitri,... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...he hasn’t broken any bones, but he doesn’t regain consciousness and he suffers recurring fits. Fyodor sends for Dr. Herzenstube, who examines Smerdyakov and concludes that he suffered an extraordinary fit.... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Fyodor still awaits Grushenka’s arrival that evening. He paces the rooms and listens for the knocks.... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 1: Kuzma Samsonov
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
For two days, Dmitri has been in “an unimaginable state.” He’s sure that Fyodor will propose to Grushenka, if he hasn’t already. He figures that Grushenka’s “torment” comes from... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
...that it would be possible to start a court action to take the land from Fyodor, which couldn’t be worth “less then twenty-five thousand,” maybe thirty. Because he can’t deal with... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
...timber.” He tells Dmitri that this same trader has been “bargaining for a year with Fyodor Pavlovich” over a woodlot, but they can’t agree on a price for it. He says... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 2: Lyagavy
Suffering Theme Icon
...over his inheritance, the priest seems frightened. He has “some sort of dependent relation to Fyodor.” The priest does, however, make a point of telling Dmitri that Lyagavy prefers to be... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
The priest leaves and wonders if he should inform Fyodor Pavlovich, his benefactor, of this strange incident. The forester goes back to his room. Dmitri... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
...the woodlot. However, Lyagavy accuses Dmitri of lying and says that he doesn’t know “any Fyodor Pavlovich of [his].” He then begins to stroke his beard and narrows his eyes “slyly.”... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 3: Gold Mines
Suffering Theme Icon
...of fine dueling pistols” to a young official for ten roubles. Dmitri then goes to Fyodor’s gazebo, looking for Smerdyakov. Finally, he goes next door to Maria Kondratievna’s, where he hears... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
...him. She wanted Katerina Ivanovna to drop him and marry “the dear, chivalrously educated Ivan Fyodorovich, who has such beautiful manners.” She detests Dmitri’s manners. (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 4: In the Dark
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Dmitri goes to his father’s house, assuming that Grushenka ran straight to Fyodor. He jumps over the wattle fence and into Fyodor’s garden. He sees a light on... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...makes up his mind. He reaches out and taps out the signal agreed upon between Fyodor and Smerdyakov: twice slowly and three more times, quickly. This signal means that Grushenka has... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 8: Delirium
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...The prosecutor tells Dmitri that he has been charged with the murder of his father, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov. (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 1: The Start of the Official Perkhotin’s Career
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Pyotr Ilyich considers going to Fyodor’s house, but worries that the old man will later accuse him of trying to force... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...says that she didn’t give Dmitri any money and concludes that he must have murdered Fyodor. She claims that she “foresaw it all,” and thinks of how close she must have... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 2: The Alarm
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...up at the police commissioner’s at the same time and on the same night of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov’s murder. (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
When Pyotr Ilyich enters the police commissioner’s house, he learns that Fyodor Pavlovich really was murdered and robbed at his home. Marfa Ignatievna woke up and rushed... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Grigory muttered incoherently to Marfa Ignatievna. She began to scream and saw that Fyodor Pavlovich’s window was open. She called out to Fyodor. She then looked through the window... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
The assistant police chief rounds up four witnesses. They then go to Fyodor’s house and conduct an investigation. They search near the fence and find the brass pestle... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
The remaining authorities arrive after four o’clock in the morning. Varvinsky stays behind at Fyodor’s home, with the object of doing an autopsy. However, he becomes more interested in Smerdyakov’s... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 3: The Soul’s Journey through Torments. The First Torment.
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...that it was no secret that he wanted his father dead. He then asks how Fyodor was killed. Ippolit Kirillovich says that they found the old man on his back, “with... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 5: The Third Torment
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...it’s what the authorities want to hear. In his version, Dmitri ran to the fence. Fyodor saw him, cried out, and jumped back from the window. Grigory then caught up with... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...ran out of it. Moreover, the signals were known only by him and Smerdyakov and Fyodor wouldn’t have opened the door for anyone else. (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...he might not tell them. Then, he tells them that they were signals to alert Fyodor to Grushenka’s arrival. The prosecutor then offers the possibility that Smerdyakov committed the crime. Dmitri... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 6: The Prosecutor Catches Mitya
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...to collect him; he would’ve killed himself. He insists that whoever it was who opened Fyodor’s door was the one who killed and robbed him, though he doesn’t know who that... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...authorities remind Dmitri that it was he who told them that the envelope was under Fyodor’s pillow. Dmitri insists that he just guessed. He says that only Smerdyakov knew where the... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 1: At Grushenka’s
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...torments Grushenka is what will happen tomorrow at Dmitri’s trial. She’s certain that Smerdyakov killed Fyodor but bets that no one has questioned him. Alexei says that he has, in fact,... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 2: An Ailing Foot
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...“rather girlish,” though she already has a grown daughter. It mentions that two hours before Fyodor’s murder, she offered him three thousand roubles to go to the gold mines in Siberia.... (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...that Dmitri killed in a fit of passion. If Dmitri says that he didn’t kill Fyodor, Madame Khokhlakov thinks that it's probably because he just doesn’t remember. She thinks that Dmitri... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 5: Not You! Not You!
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...destroying Dmitri. He tells Alexei about the letter Katerina has, “[proving] mathematically” that Dmitri killed Fyodor. (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 6: The First Meeting with Smerdyakov
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...as a “reproach” and not as praise, because he was worried that Ivan was abandoning Fyodor and that Smerdyakov could’ve been blamed for the three thousand roubles. (full context)
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Dmitri didn’t do it. Ivan prompted him to recall the night when Dmitri burst into Fyodor’s house after dinner and beat him up. That night, Ivan wished for their father’s death.... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 7: The Second Visit to Smerdyakov
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Smerdyakov says that Ivan knew that Fyodor would be killed and “left him then as a sacrifice.” Smerdyakov was promising not to... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...he stopped Ivan at the gate to test him on whether or not he wanted Fyodor dead. Smerdyakov’s “insistent, insolent tone” helps Ivan realize that Smerdyakov killed their father, and he... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...about the conversation he just had. Ivan says that, if it was Smerdyakov who killed Fyodor, then he agrees that he played a role in putting the lackey up to it.... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...incoherent letter” that Dmitri wrote at the Metropolis tavern. In it, he confesses to killing Fyodor. (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 8: The Third and Last Meeting with Smerdyakov
Suffering Theme Icon
...He says that he won’t say anything against Ivan because it wasn’t Ivan who killed Fyodor. When Ivan says that he knows this, Smerdyakov expresses skepticism of Ivan’s certainty. Ivan calls... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Ivan goes cold and begins shivering. He asks if Smerdyakov killed Fyodor. Smerdyakov pulls his left leg up and rolls up the trouser leg. Underneath, he’s wearing... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...expected that Dmitri would jump over the fence, go to the Karamazov house, and kill Fyodor. Ivan says that if Dmitri killed Fyodor, he’d surely take the money. So, what would... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
When Smerdyakov heard Fyodor cry out, he laid in bed, waiting. Then, he went to Fyodor’s window and took... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 10: “He Said That!”
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...says that the Gentleman “slandered” him by saying that Ivan will announce that Smerdyakov killed Fyodor at his suggestion. Alexei tells Ivan that this isn’t true, and he’s only delirious. (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 1: The Fatal Day
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...look at Katerina’s rival, Grushenka. The ladies regard her as the person who destroyed both Fyodor Pavlovich and his son. On the other hand, the ladies’ husbands dislike Dmitri. Some had... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...left side. In the center is all of the material evidence, including the brass pestle, Fyodor’s bloody dressing gown, and Dmitri’s bloodstained shirt and frock coat. The pistol and the envelope... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 2: Dangerous Witnesses
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Grigory Vasilievich testifies that Fyodor cheated Dmitri out of his settlement and owed him several thousands. When the prosecutor asks... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...about the door. He confirms that Grigory has always been honest and as faithful to Fyodor “as seven hundred poodles.” (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 4: Fortune Smiles on Mitya
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...say anything. He also says that Dmitri never said anything directly about wanting to kill Fyodor. He admits to believing, briefly, that Dmitri could do such a thing, but thought that... (full context)
Suffering Theme Icon
...respect,” afraid of causing her pain. She says that she knew about Dmitri’s disputes with Fyodor but didn’t hear any threats. She says that, if Dmitri had only come to her,... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Grushenka appears next. Regarding her relationship with Fyodor, she says “there was nothing to it.” She says that the whole thing is her... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
...the public, who regard her contemptuously as she steps down. The next witness is Ivan Fyodorovich. (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 5: A Sudden Catastrophe
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...from Smerdyakov the day before. He then says that it was the lackey who killed Fyodor, on Ivan’s instructions. (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 6: The Prosecutor’s Speech. Characterizations
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich then recounts the history of the Karamazov family, how Fyodor was born into nobility but pretended to be a peasant to collect his fortune, lived... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 7: A Historical Survey
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...this inheritance seemed to be the key to Dmitri’s happiness. Therefore, the thought of killing Fyodor emerged. Ippolit Kirillovich describes all of Dmitri’s efforts to obtain the money without committing the... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 8: A Treatise on Smerdyakov
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...suffer from “falling sickness” also suffer from guilt. This explains why Smerdyakov didn’t want Ivan, Fyodor’s sole protector, to leave for Moscow. After all, Dmitri had written in a letter that... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...everyone to “lay aside psychology” and focus on the facts. How would Smerdyakov have killed Fyodor? Alone or with Dmitri? He says that it’s possible that Smerdyakov pretended to be sickly... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 12: And There Was No Murder Either
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
So, who killed Fyodor Karamazov? Fetyukovich admits that Ivan Karamazov is ill. Still, he uttered Smerdyakov’s name, and the... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 13: An Adulterer of Thought
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Fetyukovich then discourses on the nature of fatherhood, and recalls how Dr. Herzenstube testified that Fyodor left Dmitri running around barefoot and in tattered clothes when he was a boy. Later,... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Fetyukovich goes on to say that Dmitri didn’t break into the house to kill Fyodor. If that were the case, Dmitri would’ve already arranged for a weapon. Instead, he instinctively... (full context)