The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov

by

Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Sometimes referred to as “Vanechka,” Ivan is the second son of Fyodor Karamazov and Sofia Ivanovna, the younger brother of Dmitri, the elder brother of Alexei, and the probable half-brother of Smerdyakov. When the novel begins, the gloomy and withdrawn Ivan is twenty-four years old and is a well-regarded intellectual and atheist. During his schooling years, he demonstrated an “unusual and brilliant aptitude for learning.” Madame Khokhlakov favors Ivan over Dmitri Fyodorovich due to having better manners. Ivan is also in love with Katerina Ivanovna, his brother Dmitri’s fiancée. Like his siblings, Ivan was neglected by his father in childhood, which results in neither man knowing the other. Ivan returns to his father as a practical stranger and becomes ashamed of his father’s drunken conduct. Ivan acts as “a mediator and conciliator” between his father and elder brother. Smerdyakov characterizes Ivan as the most like his father of all of his brothers—a proud sensualist who enjoys living in “peaceful prosperity, without bowing to anyone.” Smerdyakov confesses to Ivan about having killed Fyodor and claims that Ivan wanted his father dead but didn’t want to take the responsibility of murdering him. After Dmitri is arrested for his father’s murder, Ivan plans to raise ten thousand roubles to help with Dmitri’s escape, should he be imprisoned. Ivan eventually succumbs to “brain fever,” or madness, and is taken into Katerina Ivanovna’s home so that she can care for him.

Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov Quotes in The Brothers Karamazov

The The Brothers Karamazov quotes below are all either spoken by Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov or refer to Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of The Brothers Karamazov published in 1990.
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 3 Quotes

“You see, my dear, there was in the eighteenth century an old sinner who stated that if God did not exist, he would have to be invented […] And man has, indeed, invented God. And the strange thing, the wonder is that such a notion—the notion of the necessity of God—could creep into the head of such a wild and wicked animal as man […] As for me, I long ago decided not to think about whether man created God or God created man […] I have a Euclidean mind, an earthly mind, and therefore it is not for us to resolve things that are not of this world […] All such questions are unsuitable to a mind created with a concept of only three dimensions. And so, I accept God […] It’s not God that I do not accept, you understand, it is this world of God’s […] that I do not accept and cannot agree to accept.”

Page Number: 234-235
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 4 Quotes

“In my opinion, Christ’s love for people is in its kind a miracle impossible on earth. True, he was God. But we are not gods. Let’s say that I, for example, am capable of profound suffering, but another man will never be able to know the degree of my suffering, because he is another and not me, and besides, a man is rarely willing to acknowledge someone else as a sufferer […] And why won’t he acknowledge it, do you think? Because I, for example, have a bad smell, or a foolish face, or once stepped on his foot […] Beggars, especially noble beggars, should never show themselves in the street; they should ask for alms through the newspapers. It’s still possible to love one’s neighbor abstractly, and even occasionally from a distance, but hardly ever up close.”

Related Symbols: The Onion
Page Number: 237
Explanation and Analysis:

“You know, with us it’s beating, the birch and the lash, that’s our national way […] I know for certain that there are floggers who get more excited with every stroke, to the point of sensuality, literal sensuality […] I’ve collected a great, great deal about Russian children, Alyosha. A little girl, five years old is hated by her mother and father, ‘most honorable and official people, educated, and well-bred.’ You see, once again I positively maintain that this peculiar quality exists in much of mankind—this love of torturing children, but only children [….] These educated parents subjected the poor five-year-old girl to every possible torture. They beat her, flogged her, kicked her, not knowing why themselves, until her whole body was nothing but bruises […] they locked her all night in the outhouse, because she wouldn’t ask to get up and go in the middle of the night […] for that they smeared her face with her excrement and made her eat the excrement […]”

Page Number: 239, 241-242
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 5 Quotes

“My action is set in Spain, in Seville, in the most horrible time of the Inquisition, when fires blazed every day to the glory of God, and ‘In the splendid auto-da-fé / Evil heretics were burnt.’ Oh, of course, this was not that coming in which he will appear, according to his promise, at the end of time, in all his heavenly glory, and which will be sudden ‘as the lightening that shineth out of the east unto the west.’ No, he desired to visit his children if only for a moment, and precisely where the fires of the heretics had begun to crackle. In his infinite mercy, he walked once again among men, in the same human image in which he had walked for three years among men fifteen centuries earlier.”

Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:

“In the deep darkness, the iron door of the prison suddenly opens, and the Grand Inquisitor himself slowly enters carrying a lamp. He is alone, the door is immediately locked behind him. He stands in the entrance and for a long time, for a minute or two, gazes into his face. At last he quietly approaches […] ‘Is it you? You?’ […] ‘Why, then, have you come to interfere with us? […] I do not know who you are, and I do not want to know whether it is you, or only his likeness; but tomorrow I shall condemn you and burn you at the stake as the most evil of heretics, and the very people who today kissed your feet, tomorrow, at a nod from me, will rush to heap the coals up around your stake […]’”

Page Number: 250
Explanation and Analysis:

“Freedom, free reason, and science will lead them into such a maze, and confront them with such miracles and insoluble mysteries, that some of them, unruly and ferocious, will exterminate themselves; others, unruly but feeble, will exterminate each other; and the remaining third, feeble and wretched, will crawl to our feet and cry out to us: ‘Yes, you were right, you alone possess his mystery, and we are coming back to you—save us from ourselves’ [….] But the flock will gather again, and again submit, and this time once and for all.”

Page Number: 258
Explanation and Analysis:

Oh, we will allow them to sin, too; they are weak and powerless, and they will love us like children for allowing them to sin. We will tell them that every sin will be redeemed if it is committed with our permission; and that we allow them to sin because we love them, and as for the punishment for these sins, very well, we take it upon ourselves [….] And they will have no secrets from us. We will allow them or forbid them to live with their wives and mistresses, to have or not to have children—all depending on their obedience—and they will submit to us gladly and joyfully. The most tormenting secrets of their conscience—all, they will bring to us, and we will decide all things, and they will joyfully believe our decision […] Peacefully they will die, peacefully they will expire in your name, and beyond the grave they will find only death.”

Page Number: 259
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 8 Quotes

“He ran there, went up to the window […] ‘Grushenka,’ he called, ‘Grushenka, are you here?’ He called her, but he didn’t want to lean out the window, he didn’t want to move away from me […] because he was very afraid of me [….] ‘But there she is,’ I said (I went up to the window and leaned all the way out), ‘there she is in the bushes, smiling to you, see?’ He suddenly believed it, he just started shaking, because he really was very much in love with her, sir, and he leaned all the way out the window. Then I grabbed that same cast-iron paperweight, the one on his desk […] and I swung and hit him from behind on the top of the head with the corner of it.”

Page Number: 629
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 9 Quotes

“I am perhaps the only man in all of nature who loves the truth and sincerely desires good. I was there when the Word died on the cross and was ascending into heaven, carrying on his bosom the soul of the thief who was crucified to the right of him, I heard the joyful shrieks of the cherubim singing and shouting ‘Hosannah,’ and the thundering shout of rapture from the seraphim, which made heaven and all creation shake. And, I swear by all that’s holy, I wanted to join the chorus and shout ‘Hosannah’ with everyone else. It was right on my lips, it was already bursting from my breast…you know, I’m very sensitive and artistically susceptible. But common sense—oh, it’s the most unfortunate quality of my nature—kept me within due bounds even then, and I missed the moment!”

Related Characters: The Gentleman (speaker), Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov
Page Number: 647
Explanation and Analysis:

“Someone takes all the honor of the good for himself and only leaves me the nasty tricks. But I don’t covet the honor of living as a moocher, I’m not ambitious. Why, of all beings in the world, am I alone condemned to be cursed by all decent people, and even to be kicked with boots [….] There’s a secret here, I know, but they won’t reveal this secret to me for anything, because then, having learned what it’s all about, I might just roar ‘Hosannah,’ and the necessary minus would immediately disappear and sensibleness would set in all over the world [….] No, until the secret is revealed, two truths exist for me: one is theirs, from there, and so far completely unknown to me; the other is mine. And who knows which is preferable…”

Related Characters: The Gentleman (speaker), Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov
Page Number: 647-648
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 5 Quotes

“‘The thing is that I am precisely in my right mind...my vile mind, the same as you, and all these m-mugs!’ he suddenly turned to the public. ‘A murdered father, and they pretend to be frightened,’ he growled with fierce contempt. ‘They pull faces to each other. Liars! Everyone wants his father dead. Viper devours viper…If there were no parricide, they’d all get angry and go home in a foul temper…Circuses! ‘Bread and circuses!’ […] Calm yourselves, I’m not mad, I’m simply a murderer! […] I have no witnesses. That dog Smerdyakov won’t send you evidence from the other world…in an envelope. You keep asking for envelopes, as if one wasn’t enough. I have no witnesses…except one, perhaps [….] He’s got a tail, Your Honor, you’d find him inadmissible! Le diable n’existe point!

Epilogue, Chapter 2 Quotes

“Love is gone, Mitya!” Katya began again, “but what is gone is painfully dear to me. Know that, for all eternity. But now, for one minute, let it be as it might have been,” she prattled with a twisted smile, again looking joyfully into his eyes. “You now love another, I love another, but still I shall love you eternally, and you me, did you know that? Love me, do you hear, love me all your life!” she exclaimed with some sort of almost threatening tremor in her voice.

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Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov Character Timeline in The Brothers Karamazov

The timeline below shows where the character Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov appears in The Brothers Karamazov. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 1: Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov 
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...of “having dinner at other men’s tables.” Fyodor was married twice and has three sons—Dmitri, Ivan, and Alexei. Dmitri, also called Mitya, was born to Fyodor’s first wife—the beautiful, wealthy, and... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 3: Second Marriage, Second Children
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Fyodor marries for a second time to Sofia Ivanovna. The marriage lasts for about eight years. Sofia is sixteen and from another province. She... (full context)
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...with a nervous disorder that causes her to have “terrible hysterical fits.” Nevertheless, she bears Ivan in the first year of her marriage to Fyodor, and Alexei three years later. Alexei... (full context)
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...shortly after that. In her will, the widow sets aside a thousand roubles each for Ivan and Alexei. The money is to be for their education. The widow’s principal heir, Yefim... (full context)
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At an early age, Ivan shows an “unusual and brilliant aptitude for learning.” He leaves Yefim Petrovich’s family at thirteen... (full context)
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One day, Ivan appeared at Fyodor’s house and lives with him for a couple of months. The pair... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 4: The Third Son, Alyosha
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At twenty years old (Ivan is twenty-four and Dmitri is almost twenty-eight), Alexei, or Alyosha, is not a fanatic or... (full context)
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...it after she was buried. He also forgot where it was. Several years after Sofia Ivanovna died, Fyodor ends up in Odessa. At this time, he develops the skill of “knocking... (full context)
Part 1: Book 1, Chapter 5: Elders
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...to know his brothers. He becomes friends intimately and quickly with Dmitri, but Alexei and Ivan are still not close. Alexei even wonders if Ivan, “the learned atheist,” might not feel... (full context)
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...and that the rest will come “with frivolous purposes” and might even offend the elder. Ivan and Pyotr Alexandrovich, he figures, are only agreeing out of curiosity. Fyodor, he thinks, is... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 1: They Arrive at the Monastery
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...is friendly with Alexei. In “a very ancient” but “roomy” carriage, Fyodor Pavlovich arrives with Ivan Fyodorovich. Dmitri Fyodorovich is late. An elderly gentleman with “sweet little eyes” comes up to... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 5: So Be It! So Be It!
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...monk reenters, he finds that his guests are engaged in lively conversation, led mainly by Ivan and the two hieromonks (monks who are also priests), Father Iosif and Father Paissy. Fyodor... (full context)
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Father Iosif says that Ivan “completely rejects the separation of Church and state,” which the hieromonk finds “curious.” Ivan explains... (full context)
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Ivan says that, if the Church takes over completely, it would “excommunicate the criminal and the... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 7: A Seminarist-Careerist
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...the more profitable. He thinks that Dmitri will drop Katerina, his fiancée, for Grushenka. Meanwhile, Ivan hopes to acquire Katerina as a result, and will, at the same time, get “her... (full context)
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Alexei finds it hard to believe that Rakitin would have been at Katerina’s while Ivan was talking about him. Rakitin confirms that he wasn’t, but that Dmitri was, and he... (full context)
Part 1: Book 2, Chapter 8: Scandal
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As Pyotr Alexandrovich and Ivan enter the Father Superior’s rooms, Pyotr begins to feel ashamed of his anger toward Fyodor.... (full context)
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...They are waiting in the Father Superior’s dining room when Pyotr Alexandrovich, Pyotr Kalganov, and Ivan enter. The Father Superior steps forward into the middle of the room to greet his... (full context)
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...to use his “parental authority” to take Alexei away from the monastery. He then invites Ivan and Maximov to leave with him and have dinner at his place instead. Ivan agrees... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 1: In the Servants’ Quarters
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...house. Fyodor’s house is for a large family but, at the moment, only he and Ivan are living there. Three servants live in the cottage: the elderly Grigory, his wife Marfa,... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 4: The Confession of an Ardent Heart. In Anecdotes.
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...daughter, and he lived with her and his sister-in-law. The colonel’s daughter is named Agafya Ivanovna. Dmitri became close to her, “quite sinlessly, as a friend.” (full context)
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...“had just finished one of the institutes for well-born young ladies.” Her name was Katerina Ivanovna. She was the daughter of the colonel’s second wife, who was long dead and born... (full context)
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...word that the colonel had stolen forty-five hundred roubles of government money. He confronted Agafya Ivanovna about it, but promised that he wouldn’t say anything if she would “secretly send” Dmitri... (full context)
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While Dmitri was preparing to go out, Katerina Ivanovna appeared at his door. She told him how Agafya Ivanovna told her that he’d give... (full context)
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Dmitri turned away from Katerina Ivanovna, leaned his forehead on the frozen glass pane of his window, and opened his drawer.... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 5: The Confession of an Ardent Heart. “Heels Up”
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Alexei asks if Dmitri is still Katerina Ivanovna’s fiancé. Dmitri says that he became her fiancé three months after the events that he... (full context)
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Ten days later, Katerina Ivanovna, Agafya Ivanovna, and her aunt left for Moscow. There, Katerina was welcomed by an old... (full context)
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Dmitri responded and said that he was only a poor boor, while Katerina Ivanovna was now rich. Dmitri then wrote to Ivan in Moscow and explained everything in a... (full context)
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...regards himself as a “thief” and a “pilferer” for taking three thousand roubles that Katerina Ivanovna entrusted him to send to her sister Agafya Ivanovna, who was in Moscow. He pretended... (full context)
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...was also Smerdyakov who told Dmitri about the three thousand roubles. Dmitri says that even Ivan doesn’t know about the money, and Fyodor is sending Ivan to Chermashnya to see about... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 6: Smerdyakov
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...mind and offers it anyway; Alexei refuses. Fyodor has the liqueur served for himself and Ivan. He then asks if Alexei has had dinner and Alexei says that he has, though... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 7: Disputation
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...there are two hermits, “somewhere in the Egyptian desert,” who can move mountains. He and Ivan conclude that Smerdyakov’s superstition is typical among Russians. Alexei says that Smerdyakov’s faith isn’t Russian... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 8: Over the Cognac
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...should be an end to mysticism and “all the fools” should be forced to reason. Ivan says that, if the truth is revealed to believers, Fyodor “will be the first to... (full context)
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Fyodor then asks Ivan if there is a God. Ivan says that there isn’t. He then poses the question... (full context)
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Fyodor says that hanging would be too good for the man who invented God. Ivan insists that there wouldn’t be civilization without God. Fyodor apologizes to Alexei for being rude... (full context)
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...some “furious shouting.” The door opens and Dmitri rushes into the room. Fyodor goes to Ivan “in terror,” clutching at him for safety. He's afraid that Dmitri has come to kill... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 9: The Sensualists
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...door. Fyodor accuses Dmitri of trying to steal money from his bedroom. Breaking away from Ivan, who’s holding him back, Fyodor rushes at his eldest son, but Dmitri seizes the old... (full context)
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Ivan and Grigory help Fyodor into an armchair. His face is bloody, but Dmitri gives him... (full context)
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Alexei rejects this idea, while Ivan views such a scenario as “viper eating another viper,” and concludes that “it would serve... (full context)
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...Grushenka as “a cheat.” He then asks where Dmitri asked Alexei to go. To Katerina Ivanovna, Alexei says. Before he leaves, Fyodor asks him to return the next morning but not... (full context)
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Alexei passes through the yard and sees Ivan sitting on a bench by the gate, “writing something in his notebook with a pencil.”... (full context)
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Alexei asks Ivan if he thinks that any man can decide if other people are worthy to live... (full context)
Part 1: Book 3, Chapter 11: One More Ruined Reputation
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...him, pretending to be a robber. It’s Dmitri. He asks him what happened at Katerina Ivanovna’s. Alexei tells him that Grushenka was also at the house, and tells him everything that... (full context)
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...he is, indeed, “a scoundrel.” He says that he told Grushenka the story about Katerina Ivanonva in Mokroye. He was weeping on his knees and praying before Katerina’s image. Grushenka wept,... (full context)
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Alexei decides that, despite his promises to see his father, Katerina Ivanovna, the Khokhlakovs, and Ivan, he won’t leave the monastery the next day but will stay... (full context)
Part 2: Book 4, Chapter 2: At His Father’s
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Alexei first visits his father’s house. He wonders why Fyodor didn’t want Ivan to know about this visit. Marfa Ignatievna opens the gate for Alexei (Grigory is ill... (full context)
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Fyodor says that Ivan left because he’s trying to win over Katerina Ivanovna, and that’s also the reason why... (full context)
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...to go lie down. Fyodor says that he thought about filing charges against Dmitri, but Ivan talked him out of it. Fyodor says that the real reason why he chose not... (full context)
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Fyodor then says that Ivan won’t go to Chermashnya, which he thinks is further proof that Ivan wishes to spy... (full context)
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...because he needs all of his money for himself. He then asks Alexei if Katerina Ivanovna will marry Dmitri or not. Alexei reports that Katerina won’t leave Dmitri. Fyodor says that... (full context)
Part 2: Book 4, Chapter 4: At the Khokhlakovs’
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...the elder Zosima will die today. Madame Khokhlakov says she knows. She adds that Katerina Ivanovna is in the house with Ivan. (full context)
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Alexei announces that he must go to see Katerina Ivanovna. It upsets Lise that he’s leaving her, though he offers to return to her rooms... (full context)
Part 2: Book 4, Chapter 5: Strain in the Drawing Room
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In the drawing room, Ivan announces that he must go to Moscow and that Katerina Ivanovna won’t see him for... (full context)
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Katerina Ivanovna’s anger makes Ivan laugh. He tells Alexei that he doesn’t think that Katerina ever loved... (full context)
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As Ivan leaves, Alexei calls after him. He blames himself for Ivan’s spiteful words, though Madame Khokhlakov... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 1: A Betrothal
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...commiserates about his brothers and his father “tormenting” him and says that she doesn’t like Ivan. Alexei is surprised by her remark but doesn’t ask her more about it. Instead, he... (full context)
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...stairs. She discourages Alexei from taking Lise’s affections seriously. Alexei changes the subject to Katerina Ivanovna’s health. Madame Khokhlakov says that she’s still delirious and that her aunts have arrived, but... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 2: Smerdyakov with a Guitar
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...the Russians “need thrashing,” though Fyodor and his children are madmen. He expresses resentment for Ivan calling him “a stinking lackey.” Dmitri, on the other hand, is “worse than any lackey.”... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 3: The Brothers Get Acquainted
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Ivan isn’t in a private room, as he claimed, but at a place by the window... (full context)
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Ivan says that he wants to live and “love with [his] insides.” He plans to move... (full context)
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Alexei wonders how things will end between Dmitri and their father, causing Ivan to snap and to feel as though he’s being turned into his brother’s keeper. He... (full context)
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Ivan asks how Katerina Ivanovna is doing. Alexei tells him about her hysterics. Ivan admits that... (full context)
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Ivan insists that he won’t fixate on “all the modern axioms,” which come from Europe anyway.... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 4: Rebellion
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Ivan admits that he’s never understood “how it’s possible to love one’s neighbors.” He recalls a... (full context)
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...him.” Alexei insists that there “is still much love in mankind, almost like Christ’s love.” Ivan thinks that Christ’s love is “a miracle impossible on earth.” People can love each other... (full context)
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Ivan decides that it’s better for them to talk about the suffering of children because people... (full context)
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Ivan narrates stories to Alexei about cruelty toward children. A Bulgarian whom he met in Moscow... (full context)
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Alexei asks Ivan to describe his point. Ivan says that, “if the devil does not exist, and man... (full context)
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Ivan says that he’s collected many stories about children, and tells one about a five-year-old girl—the... (full context)
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Ivan tells another story about a general who lived at the beginning of the century. He... (full context)
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Ivan says that the general was later declared too incompetent to manage his estate. He asks... (full context)
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Alexei says that his brother’s speech amounts to a rebellion. Ivan asks Alexei to imagine that he’s “building the edifice of human destiny with the object... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 5: The Grand Inquisitor
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Ivan tells Alexei that his action takes place in the sixteenth century. Back then, it was... (full context)
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Alexei asks if the prisoner just sits silently. Ivan says that the Cardinal Grand Inquisitor tells him to be silent because “he has no... (full context)
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Ivan then stops, flushed from speaking, and smiles. Alexei finds the poem absurd and reminds Ivan... (full context)
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Alexei asks Ivan how the poem ends. Ivan says that Christ approaches the Cardinal Grand Inquisitor and kisses... (full context)
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Alexei asks Ivan how he can love with such ideas in his heart. Ivan says that “the Karamazov... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 6: A Rather Obscure One for the Moment
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Ivan goes to his father’s house, feeling anguished. He wonders if he hates Fyodor. He then... (full context)
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Ivan wants to curse Smerdyakov but, instead, asks him if Fyodor is “asleep or awake.” He’s... (full context)
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Ivan assures Smerdyakov that Dmitri’s threats are “just passionate talk,” and that he won’t kill anyone.... (full context)
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...told Dmitri about the signals when he threatened to break Smerdyakov’s legs for deceiving him. Ivan says that if Smerdyakov thinks that Dmitri will try to use these signals to get... (full context)
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Ivan calls Smerdyakov’s speech “drivel” for how neatly he thinks everything will come together. Ivan then... (full context)
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Ivan says that Dmitri wouldn’t steal money. Smerdyakov reminds Ivan that Dmitri’s broke. Furthermore, he considers... (full context)
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 7: “It’s Always Interesting to Talk with an Intelligent Man”
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When Ivan enters the house, Fyodor appears in a hurry to tell him something. However, Fyodor then... (full context)
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Ivan wakes up the next morning at about seven o’clock. He goes downstairs to have tea.... (full context)
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Ivan suggests that the priest settle things with Lyagavy. Fyodor says that won’t work because the... (full context)
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Once again, Ivan says that he has no time, and, once again, Fyodor asks Ivan to do his... (full context)
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The carriage races off. Ivan finds that he feels very good. He wonders what Smerdyakov meant with his parting words.... (full context)
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Ivan boards the seven o’clock train to Moscow, feeling as though he has left behind “the... (full context)
Part 3: Book 7, Chapter 2: An Opportune Moment
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...He feels “some vague but tormenting and evil impression” left over from his conversation with Ivan the day before. (full context)
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Rakitin asks Alexei if he knows that Ivan has left for Moscow, and Alexei says he does. He mentions that he has to... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 3: Gold Mines
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...next door to Maria Kondratievna’s, where he hears about Smerdyakov’s illness. He also learns that Ivan left for Moscow on the same morning as Smerdyakov’s falling fit. He’s only worried about... (full context)
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...with her before. More importantly, Dmitri knows that she can’t stand him. She wanted Katerina Ivanovna to drop him and marry “the dear, chivalrously educated Ivan Fyodorovich, who has such beautiful... (full context)
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Dmitri figures that, being so against his marrying Katerina Ivanovna, Madame Khokhlakov will give him the three thousand roubles to be rid of him. When... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 1: At Grushenka’s
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...says that she doesn’t think Dmitri loves her, especially given how he still praises Katerina Ivanovna. She covers her eyes and bursts into tears. Alexei assures her that Dmitri doesn’t love... (full context)
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...questioned,” but he’s been very sick since his last falling fit. He adds that he, Ivan, and Katerina Ivanovna have put up three thousand roubles for the lawyer Fetyukovich to represent... (full context)
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...asks Alexei a question that she’s been wanting to ask for a long time: is Ivan in love with Katerina Ivanovna, as Dmitri said? Alexei says he doesn’t think Ivan loves... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 2: An Ailing Foot
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...thinks Lise has gone mad. Though she trusts Alexei with her daughter, she doesn’t trust Ivan, who visited Lise without Madame Khokhlakov’s knowledge. She says that, six nights ago, he visited... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 3: A Little Demon
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...his brother. She pushes him out the door and gives him a letter addressed to Ivan. She demands that he give it to his brother. This, Lise says, is the reason... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 4: A Hymn and a Secret
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Dmitri says that Ivan doesn’t have God. Alexei asks if Dmitri has talked with his lawyer. Dmitri curses the... (full context)
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Dmitri asks Alexei to go to Katerina Ivanovna so that she won’t testify about how Dmitri once lent her forty-five hundred roubles. It'll... (full context)
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...the room, and then decides to reveal the “secret” that Grushenka suspects exists between him, Ivan, and Katerina Ivanovna: Ivan has suggested that Dmitri escape if he’s sent to prison. Alexei... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 5: Not You! Not You!
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On the way to seeing Ivan, Alexei stops at the house where Katerina Ivanovna is staying. It’s been more than a... (full context)
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Alexei hands Lise’s letter to Ivan. Ivan laughs, recognizes the handwriting, and calls her a “little demon.” He tells Alexei that... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 6: The First Meeting with Smerdyakov
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This is the third time that Ivan has gone to talk to Smerdyakov since returning from Moscow. Ivan returned to town five... (full context)
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Ivan asked if Smerdyakov foretold that he would have a falling fit as he was descending... (full context)
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Ivan then asked why Smerdyakov wanted him to go to Chermashnya. Smerdyakov said that he said... (full context)
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Ivan asked if Smerdyakov told the district attorney and prosecutor about the knocking signals. Smerdyakov said... (full context)
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Ivan rose and said that he didn’t believe that Smerdyakov committed the murder. He thought it... (full context)
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In the next few days, Ivan “acquainted himself with all the evidence” and decided that Dmitri was guilty. Meanwhile, Alexei insisted... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 7: The Second Visit to Smerdyakov
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...been discharged from the hospital. He lives with Maria Kondratievna and her mother now. When Ivan sees Smerdyakov, he concludes that he’s recovered “completely” because his face is “fresher” and “fuller.”... (full context)
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Smerdyakov says that Ivan knew that Fyodor would be killed and “left him then as a sacrifice.” Smerdyakov was... (full context)
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Smerdyakov says that he stopped Ivan at the gate to test him on whether or not he wanted Fyodor dead. Smerdyakov’s... (full context)
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Ivan insists that, if he had been “counting on” anyone to commit murder, it would’ve been... (full context)
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Ivan leaves Smerdyakov and goes to Katerina Ivanovna’s. He frantically tells her about the conversation he... (full context)
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Katerina Ivanovna gets up and goes to her desk and takes out a piece of paper. She... (full context)
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Ivan recalls how Katerina Ivanovna would say that Ivan convinced her of Dmitri’s guilt, which is... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 8: The Third and Last Meeting with Smerdyakov
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On his way, to see Smerdyakov, Ivan comes across a drunk peasant who is singing loudly. The peasant collides with Ivan who,... (full context)
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When Ivan arrives, Maria Kondratievna tells him that Smerdyakov is very sick. She assures Ivan that Smerdyakov... (full context)
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Ivan goes cold and begins shivering. He asks if Smerdyakov killed Fyodor. Smerdyakov pulls his left... (full context)
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Ivan asks Smerdyakov for details about how he committed the murder. Smerdyakov admits that he faked... (full context)
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...waken Marfa Ignatievna, who rose, saw that Grigory was missing, and went into the garden. Ivan asks about the door: if Fyodor opened it, how did Grigory testify that he saw... (full context)
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Ivan says that he and Smerdyakov must go to court and confess everything. Smerdyakov refuses and... (full context)
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Outside, Ivan steps into a blizzard. He trips over something and realizes that it's the peasant he... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 9: The Devil. Ivan Fyodorovich’s Nightmare
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That evening, Ivan succumbs to brain fever, which will soon take “complete possession of his organism.” He had... (full context)
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Ivan talks to the Gentleman, but never abandons the belief that he’s only talking only to... (full context)
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Ivan starts pacing, and the Gentleman tells him that his “nerves are unstrung.” He tells Ivan... (full context)
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Ivan asks the Gentleman to tell him a “funny anecdote.” He tells a story about a... (full context)
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The Gentleman says that he only wanted to make Ivan laugh. He tells Ivan other stories. Ivan begs the Gentleman to leave him; his head... (full context)
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...God, they will be able to conquer nature. They will also accept death. He tells Ivan that the present question is whether or not such a time will ever come. If... (full context)
Part 4: Book 11, Chapter 10: “He Said That!”
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Ivan jumps up, throws off the towel, and paces. He says that he feels as though... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 4: Fortune Smiles on Mitya
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...as passionate but also “noble, proud, and generous.” Regarding the rivalry between Grushenka and Katerina Ivanovna, he prefers not to say anything. He also says that Dmitri never said anything directly... (full context)
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...roubles. Though he had the means to pay back half of his debt to Katerina Ivanovna, he couldn’t part with the money. Alexei clarifies that Dmitri didn’t so much pound; he... (full context)
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Katerina Ivanovna is next. The presiding judge speaks to her “with extreme respect,” afraid of causing her... (full context)
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...Fyodor, though she has no grounds for her accusation. Grushenka insists that it was Katerina Ivanovna—“that man-stealer”—who ruined Dmitri. She recounts how Katerina once sent for her and tried to charm... (full context)
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...on the public, who regard her contemptuously as she steps down. The next witness is Ivan Fyodorovich. (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 5: A Sudden Catastrophe
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The presiding judge tells Ivan that he’s not under oath and should provide testimony “in good conscience.” Ivan listens and... (full context)
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...jumps up and says that he’s delirious and shouldn’t be believed. The presiding judge tells Ivan that his testimony is “incomprehensible.” If he actually has something to say, he should calm... (full context)
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Turmoil ensues in court. Katerina Ivanovna goes into hysterics. Suddenly, she offers a piece of evidence. She demands that they take... (full context)
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Grushenka rushes to Dmitri and says to the court that Katerina Ivanovna has revealed herself to be a snake. The guards try to remove her from the... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 6: The Prosecutor’s Speech. Characterizations
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...dissipation, and behaved very poorly as a father. He says that, of all the sons, Ivan resembles his father most, due to his cynicism. Here, the prosecutor gets carried away, taking... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 8: A Treatise on Smerdyakov
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...who suffer from “falling sickness” also suffer from guilt. This explains why Smerdyakov didn’t want Ivan, Fyodor’s sole protector, to leave for Moscow. After all, Dmitri had written in a letter... (full context)
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In regard to the money that Ivan presented, Ippolit Kirillovich insists that it’s no proof. Having the three thousand roubles doesn’t prove... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 12: And There Was No Murder Either
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So, who killed Fyodor Karamazov? Fetyukovich admits that Ivan Karamazov is ill. Still, he uttered Smerdyakov’s name, and the prosecutor doesn’t think that the... (full context)
Epilogue, Chapter 1: Plans to Save Mitya
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Five days after Dmitri’s trial, before nine o’clock, Alexei goes to see Katerina Ivanovna. She talks with him in the same room in which she once received Grushenka. Ivan... (full context)
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Katerina Ivanovna says that, when Ivan first revealed the plan to her, they quarreled because she got... (full context)
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Katerina Ivanovna condemns her own character and says that Ivan, too, will probably leave her for “someone... (full context)
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Alexei tells Katerina Ivanovna that Dmitri has asked to see her. She resists, but he tells her that she... (full context)
Epilogue, Chapter 2: For a Moment the Lie Became Truth
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...finds Dmitri sitting on a cot, wearing a hospital robe. Dmitri is certain that Katerina Ivanovna won’t come, but he also feels that it’s impossible for her not to come. Alexei... (full context)
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...Dmitri says she does, but she won’t come this morning. She seems fine with Katerina Ivanovna making all of the arrangements, however, and knows that she loves Ivan and not Dmitri.... (full context)
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Suddenly, Katerina Ivanovna appears in the doorway. She rushes toward Dmitri and seizes hold of his hands. She... (full context)
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Grushenka stares at Katerina Ivanovna and says that they’re both “wicked.” Dmitri reproaches Grushenka for not forgiving Katerina, and Alexei... (full context)