The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov

by

Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Often called “Gorstkin,” because he takes “bitter offense” at the nickname Lyagavy, which means “bird dog.” The peasant trader in the blue coat buys timber land. Both Fyodor Pavlovich and Dmitri Fyodorovich seek him out in order to sell him a woodlot in Chermashnya. Fyodor has been doing business with him for a long time but regards him as “a complete scoundrel.” When Fyodor asks Ivan Fyodorovich to go to Chermashnya, he warns his son that Lyagavy is a swindler and “a rogue” with a penchant for lies. Fyodor tells Ivan to watch Lyagavy’s beard when he speaks and not his eyes, which are “murky water.” If he looks angry and his “red, ugly, thin little beard” shakes, he’s telling the truth. If he strokes his beard with his left hand, it means that he’s going to cheat someone. When Dmitri first encounters him in Sukhoy Possyolok, Lyagavy is passed out drunk after having consumed nearly a quart of vodka.
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Lyagavy Character Timeline in The Brothers Karamazov

The timeline below shows where the character Lyagavy appears in The Brothers Karamazov. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2: Book 5, Chapter 7: “It’s Always Interesting to Talk with an Intelligent Man”
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...favor to him. He has a woodlot there “on waste lands.” A little merchant named Lyagavy, who calls himself Gorstkin, has come along, he says, and wants to offer eleven thousand... (full context)
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Ivan suggests that the priest settle things with Lyagavy. Fyodor says that won’t work because the priest “has no eye for business.” Also, Lyagavy... (full context)
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...he sets off on his trip. Fyodor scribbles a note for Ivan to present to Lyagavy. Then the horses are sent for and cognac is served “with a bite to eat.”... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 1: Kuzma Samsonov
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...knowing what to do next. Samsonov suggests that Dmitri go to a local man named Lyagavy who “trades in timber.” He tells Dmitri that this same trader has been “bargaining for... (full context)
Part 3: Book 8, Chapter 2: Lyagavy
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...Ilyinskoye. The priest isn’t home but in a neighboring village. The priest tells Dmitri that Lyagavy is now in Sukhoy Possyolok. He’s spending the night in the forester’s hut because he’s... (full context)
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When they get to Sukhoy Possyolok, they go into Lyagavy’s room in his hut. He’s in there, “stretched out on a bench…snoring heavily.” Dmitri is... (full context)
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...“to catch the right moment.” He goes over to look at the sleeping man’s face. Lyagavy is lean and “not yet old, with a very oblong face.” Dmitri regards him with... (full context)
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...forester wakes up. They open the door and fling the windows open. Dmitri assumes that Lyagavy is dead. He gets a bucket, dips it in water, finds a rag, and puts... (full context)
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Despite Lyagavy’s drunkenness, Dmitri introduces himself and states his business with the woodlot. However, Lyagavy accuses Dmitri... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 4: The Second Torment
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...recognizing that he had been made a fool. He also describes his trip to see Lyagavy and his “jealous torments over Grushenka.” Everyone listens attentively. He talks, too, about the despair... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 7: A Historical Survey
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...efforts to obtain the money without committing the crime, including the adventures with Samsonov and Lyagavy. He also mentions his going to Madame Khokhlakov. The prosecutor claims that, if Fenya had... (full context)