The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov

by

Fyodor Dostoevsky

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The Brothers Karamazov: Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
After the transcript is signed, Nikolai Parfenovich reads out the “Resolution” that makes note of the charges against Dmitri. While he’s declared himself “not guilty,” he’s not brought anything forward to vindicate himself. Meanwhile, testimonies from the witnesses “show him to be guilty to the highest degree.” Dmitri is to be taken away by the deputy commissioner, Mavriky Mavrikievich. Nikolai Parfenovich assures him that the investigation is not yet over and will be continued in town. Dmitri requests to see Grushenka before he’s led away. He asks for her forgiveness for “[ruining]” her “with [his] love.” He wants to say something more, but he stops himself and walks out.
No one believes Grushenka’s testimony because she has no basis for any of her claims and she has a reputation as an immoral woman. Also, the authorities don’t believe what Dmitri says about the fifteen hundred because he never told anyone else about it. Even if they were able to recover the amulet, it wouldn’t have been certifiable proof that he didn’t, in fact, have three thousand roubles. The witnesses’ testimony is simply too damning. Still, Dmitri is more worried about how all of this will affect Grushenka.
Themes
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
When Dmitri gets in the cart that will escort him to jail, he bids everyone crowded at the gates, including the witnesses, “farewell.” Dmitri twice says “farewell” to Trifon Borisich, who doesn’t reply. Mavriky Mavrikievich also snaps “fiercely” at Dmitri for calling him “old fellow” instead of addressing him by his title. Pyotr Fomich Kalganov bids Dmitri farewell, however, and Dmitri returns the greeting. Kalganov then runs back into the front hall, sits down in a corner, bends his head, and cries. He believes “almost completely” in Dmitri’s guilt and, at that moment, doesn’t want to live in the world as it is.
Trifon Borisich expresses his underlying contempt for Dmitri in this moment. Mavriky Mavrikievich also exposes his class contempt, triggered by Dmitri’s overfamiliarity. Kalgonov is the only one to sympathize with Dmitri, as he knows him personally. He is an innocent who’s likely confounded by the whole case, unable to believe in either Dmitri’s guilt or innocence but sad that he lives in a world in which an act such as patricide is conscionable.
Themes
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon