The Browning Version

Andrew Crocker-Harris Character Analysis

Andrew Crocker-Harris is the protagonist of the play. He is a taciturn, middle-aged teacher of Classics and has clearly had his spirit worn down over the years. There is no love left in his marriage to Millie, who openly has affairs with other men. The play represents his penultimate day at the school in which he has worked since graduating with prestigious honors from university; on doctor’s orders, he is moving to a job that will place considerably less strain on his poor health. This sense of finality, then, forces him to confront who he is and how his life has turned out. Andrew cultivates an atmosphere of intimidation with his pupils and knows he is generally disliked, while with his peers he strives to maintain a distance and betray no suggestion of inner feeling. That said, he confesses to his young successor, Mr. Gilbert, that he once held lofty ideals of imparting his “joy” for great literature to his pupils, and by and large he considers himself to have failed. Though he was keenly aware of his lack of likeability, he is genuinely shocked to learn that his headmaster, Dr. Frobisher, refers to him as “the Himmler of the fifth”—a nickname after a tyrannical Nazi commander. The school does not seem to have much respect for Andrew, despite his many years of service. They refuse him his pension, and Dr. Frobisher asks him to speak first at the end-of-term assembly, rather than in the “headline” slot that is his right as a senior teacher. Though Andrew initially accepts his fate with meek resignation, his pupil Taplow’s gift of The Agamemnon (Robert Browning’s version) and the inscription it contains awaken a latent sense of emotion in him. This reconnection with his emotional self and subsequent confrontation with his life to date gives Andrew a quiet defiance in the play’s closing moments. Speaking again to the headmaster, Andrew insists on his rightful place in the assembly speaking order, hinting at the possibility that he will take a more active and determined role in his own life going forward. Taplow’s inscription, a quote from play, hints at the way Rattigan wants the audience to perceive Andrew: “God from afar looks graciously upon a gentle master.”

Andrew Crocker-Harris Quotes in The Browning Version

The The Browning Version quotes below are all either spoken by Andrew Crocker-Harris or refer to Andrew Crocker-Harris. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Personal Success and Failure Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Nick Hern Books edition of The Browning Version published in 2008.
The Browning Version Quotes

TAPLOW: (Protestingly.) I’m extremely interested in science, sir.

FRANK: Are you? I’m not. Not at least in the science I have to teach.

TAPLOW: Well, anyway, sir, it’s a good deal more exciting than this muck. (Indicating his book.)

FRANK: What is this muck?

TAPLOW: Aeschylus, sir. The Agamemnon.

FRANK: And your considered view is that the Agamemnon of Aeschylus is muck, is it?

TAPLOW: Well, no, sir. I don’t think the play is muck – exactly. I suppose, in a way, it’s rather a good plot, really, a wife murdering her husband and having a lover and all that. I only meant the way it’s taught to us – just a lot of Greek words strung together and fifty lines if you get them wrong.

Related Characters: John Taplow (speaker), Frank Hunter (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 5
Explanation and Analysis:
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TAPLOW: (Mimicking a very gentle, rather throaty voice) “My dear Taplow, I have given you exactly what you deserve. No less; and certainly no more.” Do you know, sir, I think he may have marked me down, rather than up, for taking extra work. I mean, the man’s barely human. (He breaks off quickly.) Sorry, sir. Have I gone too far?

Related Characters: John Taplow (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris, Frank Hunter
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:
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FRANK: Possibly not. He ought never to have become a school master, really. Why did he?

MILLIE: It was his vocation, he said. He was sure he'd make a big success of it, especially when he got his job here first go off. (Bitterly) Fine success he’s made, hasn’t he?

FRANK: You should have stopped him.

MILLIE: How was I to know? He talked about getting a house, then a headmastership.

FRANK: The Crock a headmaster! That’s a pretty thought.

MILLIE: Yes, it’s funny to think of it now, all right. Still he wasn’t always the Crock, you know. He had a bit more gumption once. At least I thought he had. Don’t let's talk any more about him – it’s too depressing.

FRANK: I’m sorry for him.

MILLIE: (Indifferently.) He's not sorry for himself, so why should you be? It’s me you should be sorry for.

Related Characters: Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Frank Hunter (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris
Page Number: 11
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: However diligently I search I can discover no ‘bloody’ – no ‘corpse’– no ‘you have slain’. Simply ‘husband’–

TAPLOW: Yes, sir. That’s right.

ANDREW: Then why do you invent words that simply are not there?

TAPLOW: I thought they sounded better, sir. More exciting. After all she did kill her husband, sir. (With relish.) She’s just been revealed with his dead body and Cassandra’s weltering in gore –

ANDREW: I am delighted at this evidence, Taplow, of your interest in the rather more lurid aspects of dramaturgy, but I feel I must remind you that you are supposed to be construing Greek, not collaborating with Aeschylus.

TAPLOW: (Greatly daring.) Yes, but still, sir, translator’s licence, sir – I didn’t get anything wrong – and after all it is a play and not just a bit of Greek construe.

ANDREW: (Momentarily at a loss.) I seem to detect a note of end of term in your remarks. I am not denying that The Agamemnon is a play. It is perhaps the greatest play ever written –

TAPLOW: (Quickly.) I wonder how many people in the form think that?

Related Characters: John Taplow (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: (Murmuring gently, not looking at TAPLOW.) When I was a very young man, only two years older than you are now, Taplow, I wrote, for my own pleasure, a translation of The Agamemnon – a very free translation – I remember – in rhyming couplets.

TAPLOW: The whole Agamemnon – in verse? That must have been hard work, sir.

ANDREW: It was hard work; but I derived great joy from it. The play had so excited and moved me that I wished to communicate, however imperfectly, some of that emotion to others. When I had finished it. I remember, I thought it very beautiful – almost more beautiful than the original.

TAPLOW: Was it ever published, sir?

ANDREW: No. Yesterday I looked for the manuscript while I was packing my papers. I was unable to find it. I fear it is lost – like so many other things. Lost for good.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), John Taplow (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:
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FROBISHER: I’ve told you about him, I think. He is a very brilliant young man and won exceptionally high honours at Oxford.

ANDREW: So I understand, sir.

FROBISHER: Not, of course, as high as the honours you yourself won there. He didn't, for instance, win the Chancellor’s prize for Latin verse or the Gaisford.

ANDREW: He won the Hertford Latin, then?
FROBISHER: No. (Mildly surprised.) Did you win that, too?

ANDREW nods

FROBISHER: It’s sometimes rather hard to remember that you are perhaps the most brilliant classical scholar we have ever had at the school –

ANDREW: You are very kind.

FROBISHER: (Urbanely corrects his gaffe.) Hard to remember, I mean – because of your other activities – your brilliant work on the school timetable, for instance, and also for your heroic battle for so long and against such odds with the soul–destroying lower fifth.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Dr. Frobisher (speaker), Peter Gilbert
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
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MILLIE: The mean old brutes! My God, what I wouldn’t like to say to them! (Rounding on ANDREW.) And what did you say? Just sat there and made a joke in Latin, I suppose?

ANDREW: There wasn’t very much I could say, in Latin or any other language.

MILLIE: Oh, wasn’t there? I’d have said it all right. I wouldn’t just have sat there twiddling my thumbs and taking it from that old phoney of a headmaster. But then, of course, I’m not a man.

ANDREW is turning the pages of the Agamemnon, not looking at her.

What do they expect you to do? Live on my money, I suppose.

ANDREW: There has never been any question of that. I shall be perfectly able to support myself.

MILLIE: Yourself? Doesn’t the marriage service say something about the husband supporting his wife? Doesn’t it? You ought to know?

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Dr. Frobisher
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 25
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: They are mostly boys of about fifteen or sixteen. They are not very difficult to handle.

GILBERT: The headmaster said you ruled them with a rod of iron. He called you the Himmler of the lower fifth.

ANDREW: Did he? The Himmler of the lower fifth? I think he exaggerated. I hope he exaggerated. The Himmler of the lower fifth?

GILBERT: (Puzzled) He only meant that you kept the most wonderful discipline. I must say I do admire you for that. I couldn’t even manage that with eleven–year–olds, so what I’ll be like with fifteens and sixteens I shudder to think.

ANDREW. It is not so difficult. They aren’t bad boys. Sometimes – a little wild and unfeeling, perhaps – but not bad. The Himmler of the lower fifth? Dear me!

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Peter Gilbert (speaker), Dr. Frobisher
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:
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GILBERT: (After a pause.) I’m afraid I said something that hurt you very much. It’s myself you must forgive, sir. Believe me, I’m desperately sorry.

ANDREW: There's no need. You were merely telling me what I should have known for myself. Perhaps I did in my heart, and hadn’t the courage to acknowledge it. I knew, of course, that I was not only not liked, but now positively disliked. I had realized, too, that the boys – for many long years now – had ceased to laugh at me. I don’t know why they no longer found me a joke. Perhaps it was my illness. No, I don’t think it was that. Something deeper than that. Not a sickness of the body, but a sickness of the soul. At all events it didn’t take much discernment on my part to realize I had become an utter failure as a schoolmaster. Still, stupidly enough, I hadn’t realized that I was also feared. The Himmler of the lower fifth! I suppose that will become my epitaph.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Peter Gilbert (speaker)
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:
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GILBERT: (Brusquely.) Darling. The Crocker–Harrises, I'm sure, have far more important things to do than to listen to your detailed but inaccurate account of our very sordid little encounter. Why not just say I married you for your money and leave it at that? Come on, we must go.

MRS. GILBERT: (To MILLIE.) Isn’t he awful to me?

MILLIE: Men have no souls, my dear. My husband is just as bad.

Related Characters: Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Peter Gilbert (speaker), Mrs. Gilbert (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:
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TAPLOW: I didn’t have a chance with the head here. I rather dashed out, I’m afraid. I thought I’d just come back and – and wish you luck, sir.

ANDREW: Thank you, Taplow. That’s good of you.
TAPLOW: I – er – thought this might interest you, sir. (He quickly thrusts a small book into ANDREW’S hand.)

ANDREW: What is it?

TAPLOW: Verse translation of the Agamemnon, sir. The Browning version. It’s not much good. I've been reading it in the Chapel gardens.

ANDREW very deliberately turns over the pages of the book.

ANDREW: Very interesting, Taplow. (He seems to have a little difficulty in speaking. He clears his throat and then goes on in his level, gentle voice.) I know the translation, of course. It has its faults, I agree, but I think you will enjoy it more when you get used to the metre he employs.

He hands it to TAPLOW who brusquely thrusts it back to him.

TAPLOW: It’s for you, sir.

ANDREW: For me?

TAPLOW: Yes, sir. I’ve written in it.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), John Taplow (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: […] “God from afar looks graciously upon a gentle master.”

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), John Taplow, Frank Hunter
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:
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Pause. MILLIE laughs suddenly.

MILLIE: The artful little beast –

FRANK: (Urgently.) Millie –

ANDREW: Artful? Why artful?

MILLIE looks at FRANK who is staring meaningly at her.

Why artful, Millie?

MILLIE laughs again, quite lightly, and turns from FRANK to ANDREW.

MILLIE: My dear, because I came into this room this afternoon to find him giving an imitation of you to Frank here. Obviously he was scared stiff I was going to tell you, and you’d ditch his remove or something. I don't blame him for trying a few bobs’ worth of appeasement.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Frank Hunter (speaker), John Taplow
Related Symbols: The Agamemnon
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:
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FRANK: (With a note of real repulsion in his voice.) Millie! My God! How could you?

MILLIE: Well, why not? Why should he be allowed his comforting little illusions? I’m not.

Related Characters: Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Frank Hunter (speaker), Andrew Crocker-Harris
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: You see, my dear Hunter, she is really quite as much to be pitied as I. We are both of us interesting subjects for your microscope. Both of us needing from the other something that would make life supportable for us, and neither of us able to give it. Two kinds of love. Hers and mine. Worlds apart, as I know now, though when I married her I didn’t think they were incompatible. In those days I hadn’t thought that her kind of love – the love she requires and which I was unable to give her – was so important that its absence would drive out the other kind of love – the kind of love that I require and which I thought, in my folly, was by far the greater part of love. I may have been, you see, Hunter, a brilliant classical scholar, but I was woefully ignorant of the facts of life. I know better now, of course. I know that in both of us, the love that we should have borne each other has turned to bitter hatred. That's all the problem is. Not a very unusual one, I venture to think – nor nearly as tragic as you seem to imagine. Merely the problem of an unsatisfied wife and a henpecked husband. You’ll find it all over the world. It is usually, I believe, a subject for farce. And now, if you have to leave us, my dear fellow, please don’t let me detain you any longer.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Millie Crocker-Harris, Frank Hunter
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: If you think, by this expression of kindness, Hunter, that you can get me to repeat the shameful exhibition of emotion I made to Taplow a moment ago, I must tell you that you have no chance. My hysteria over that book just now was no more than a sort of reflex action of the spirit. The muscular twitchings of a corpse. It can never happen again.

FRANK: A corpse can be revived.

ANDREW: I don’t believe in miracles.

FRANK: Don’t you? Funnily enough, as a scientist, I do.

ANDREW: Your faith would be touching, if I were capable of being touched by it.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Frank Hunter (speaker), John Taplow
Page Number: 43
Explanation and Analysis:
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MILLIE: He’s coming to Bradford. He’s not going to you.

ANDREW: The likeliest contingency is, that he’s not going to either of us. Shall we have dinner?

MILLIE: He’s coming to Bradford.

ANDREW: I expect so. Oh, by the way, I’m not. I shall be staying here until I go to Dorset.

MILLIE: (Indifferently.) Suit yourself – what makes you think I’ll join you there?

ANDREW: I don’t.

MILLIE: You needn’t expect me.

ANDREW: I don’t think either of us has the right to expect anything further from the other.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Millie Crocker-Harris (speaker), Frank Hunter
Page Number: 44-45
Explanation and Analysis:
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ANDREW: Oh, by the way, headmaster. I have changed my mind about the prize–giving ceremony. I intend to speak after, instead of before, Fletcher, as is my privilege . . . Yes, I quite understand, but I am now seeing the matter in a different light . . . I know, but I am of opinion that occasionally an anti–climax can be surprisingly effective. Goodbye.

(He rings off and goes and sits at table.)

Come along, my dear. We mustn’t let our dinner get cold.

Related Characters: Andrew Crocker-Harris (speaker), Dr. Frobisher
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:
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Andrew Crocker-Harris Character Timeline in The Browning Version

The timeline below shows where the character Andrew Crocker-Harris appears in The Browning Version. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Browning Version
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...the curtain goes up, the audience sees a fairly large, gloomy flat, in which live Andrew Crocker-Harris, a schoolmaster who is having to give up his job due to poor health,... (full context)
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...a sixteen-year-old pupil of fairly plain appearance, enters the room, calling for his Classics teacher, Andrew Crocker-Harris. Hearing no response, he goes over to a small box of chocolates and eats... (full context)
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...are announced. Though most teachers have already informed pupils of their results, he goes on, Mr. Crocker-Harris is insisting on strict protocol and won’t tell him until tomorrow. Taplow explains that he... (full context)
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...husband and having another lover, is actually “rather good.” Taplow complains, though, that the way Mr. Crocker-Harris teaches sucks the excitement out of it. (full context)
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Frank asks why Taplow is in Mr. Crocker-Harris ’s apartment on the last day of school. Taplow has extra work, he explains, because... (full context)
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Taplow tells Frank that he’d asked Mr. Crocker-Harris yesterday whether he had got his “remove.” Taplow then impersonates his teacher’s response, saying in... (full context)
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...stern. Frank instructs Taplow to get on with his Aeschylus while they both wait for Mr. Crocker-Harris . Frank says that, as Mr. Crocker-Harris is ten minutes late for Taplow, perhaps the... (full context)
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Frank asks Taplow why the schoolboys are so scared of Mr. Crocker-Harris : “what does he do—beat you all or something?” Taplow explains that Mr. Crocker-Harris is... (full context)
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Taplow confesses that he can’t help liking Mr. Crocker-Harris , “in spite of everything.” He relates a story to Frank from one his recent... (full context)
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...class “so that they too can share your pleasure.” Just at this moment, Millie Crocker-Harris, Andrew Crocker-Harris’ wife, enters the room; it takes a few seconds for Taplow and Frank to... (full context)
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...cream. Leaving the room, Taplow asks Frank in a whisper to ensure Millie doesn’t tell Andrew about his impression. (full context)
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...her soon in Bradford. Millie complains that Bradford won’t be for another month yet, as Andrew doesn’t start his new job until September. (full context)
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...wants him to come in August if he can’t in September, but he objects that Andrew will still be there, before deciding he should be able to manage September. She complains... (full context)
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...to either be like him or use “the sort of petty, soulless tyranny” employed by Andrew. (full context)
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Frank asks Millie why Andrew decided to become a schoolmaster in the first place. According to Millie, Andrew had thought... (full context)
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Andrew Crocker-Harris enters, dressed in a suit and looking generally “neat” and “unruffled.” Frank and Millie... (full context)
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As Andrew steps deeper into the room he notices Frank and greets him. Andrew says that he... (full context)
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Andrew unfurls the timetable, which is a long roll of paper “entirely covered in meticulous writing.”... (full context)
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Frank asks about the new job Andrew will go to; Andrew explains that it is a “crammer’s” for “backwards boys”—the work will... (full context)
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Taplow comes back to the flat, looking out of breath. He hands Andrew’s medicine to Millie. Andrew apologizes to Taplow for being late. Millie exits to the kitchen... (full context)
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Andrew sits down at the table and invites Taplow to do the same. They both open... (full context)
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Andrew asks Taplow where he has read the words “bloody,” “corpse,” and “you have slain”—they are... (full context)
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...that his interpretation is valid as “it is a play,” and he has “translator’s license.” Andrew thinks Taplow is behaving this way because it’s the end of term but admits that... (full context)
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Andrew stares at the book, motionless. He slowly raises his head and, not making eye contact... (full context)
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Taplow asks “was it ever published, sir?” Andrew explains that he had looked for the manuscript yesterday while packing his papers but couldn’t... (full context)
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Millie comes in, wearing an apron. She informs Andrew that the headmaster, Dr. Frobisher, is about to arrive. Taplow gets up, thinking that he... (full context)
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Dr. Frobisher asks Andrew if the Gilberts have called to the flat yet. Andrew does not know who they... (full context)
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...distinguished academic achievements at Oxford University, but says they aren’t as high as the honors Andrew attained. He says, “it’s sometimes hard to remember that you are perhaps the most brilliant... (full context)
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Changing the subject, Dr. Frobisher informs Andrew that he has two “delicate matters” to discuss. The headmaster expresses how “unlucky” it is... (full context)
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Andrew asks whether Dr. Frobisher’s comment confirms he will not receive any pension from the school.... (full context)
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Dr. Frobisher says Andrew’s case for a pension is just as deserving as Buller’s was, but “rules are rules.”... (full context)
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Andrew says that he does not deny a pension would have been “very welcome,” but sees... (full context)
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...him greatly and accordingly, believes Dr. Frobisher, this should be the climax of the ceremony. Andrew says: “Naturally, headmaster, I wouldn’t wish to provide an anti-climax.” The headmaster thanks him for... (full context)
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...in, having smartened up. She exchanges greetings with Dr. Frobisher. He compliments her appearance, asking Andrew if he knows that he has a “very attractive wife.” Millie offers him a drink,... (full context)
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With Dr. Frobisher gone, Millie comes back into the room and curtly asks Andrew: “Well? Do we get it?” After a moment’s hesitation, Andrew realizes she is asking about... (full context)
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Millie asks whether Andrew expects to live on her money; with his eyes fixed firmly on The Agamemnon he... (full context)
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Andrew informs Millie of Dr. Frobisher’s other “delicate matter,” to have him speak first at tomorrow’s... (full context)
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Andrew explains to Millie that Peter Gilbert is his successor, who has come with Mrs. Gilbert... (full context)
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Andrew asks Gilbert if he wants to go with the others to see the flat, but... (full context)
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Gilbert says that Dr. Frobisher told him that Andrew “ruled them [the pupils] with a rod of iron. He called you the Himmler of... (full context)
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Gilbert apologizes for being tactless. Andrew explains that from the beginning of his career at the school he realized he “didn’t... (full context)
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Andrew goes on: “For two or three years I tried very hard to communicate to the... (full context)
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Andrew explains that, when he first started teaching, he found that the boys would laugh at... (full context)
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Gilbert is now “deeply embarrassed and rather upset.” Andrew apologizes for burdening him and predicts that Gilbert will do well. Millie and Mrs. Gilbert... (full context)
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...Gilbert shape to leave, with Peter lingering behind to talk for a final moment with Andrew. Millie goes out with Mrs. Gilbert. (full context)
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Andrew asks Gilbert not to tell anyone about their previous conversation. He says he does not... (full context)
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...want to be a schoolmaster but bets that he won’t be leaving without a pension. Andrew seems quiet, causing Millie to ask if he’s going to have another one of his... (full context)
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Left alone, Andrew stares at The Agamemnon, pretending to read. Eventually he puts a hand over his eyes.... (full context)
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Andrew asks Taplow sharply what he has come for. Taplow replies that he just wanted to... (full context)
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...He says, “it’s not much good” and that he’s been reading it in the gardens. Andrew clears his throat, seemingly in difficulty. He tells Taplow that he knows the translation and... (full context)
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Andrew gives the book back to Taplow, who quickly thrusts it back to him. “It’s for... (full context)
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Taplow assumes that Andrew already has the Browning version; but Andrew informs him that, though he may have had... (full context)
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Andrew sits down. As soon as Taplow leaves the room, Andrew breaks down and “sobs uncontrollably.”... (full context)
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...knock on the garden door. Frank Hunter comes in, apologizing for interrupting; he had thought Andrew and Taplow would have been finished by now. Andrew explains that the lesson is long... (full context)
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Andrew tells Frank that he wants him to see the gift Taplow has given him and... (full context)
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Andrew recites the inscription, which is a quote from The Agamemnon itself, first in Greek and... (full context)
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Andrew recovers himself a little, expressing “what a fool” he’s made of himself in front of... (full context)
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Millie comes in and takes a cigarette from Frank. He explains that Andrew has just received a “very nice” present from Taplow. Andrew shows her the book, explaining... (full context)
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Frank gives the translation for the inscription but gets it slightly wrong. As Andrew gently corrects him, Millie lets out a sudden laugh. She says it’s obvious Taplow is... (full context)
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Andrew nods quietly and says only “I see.” He puts the book down and walks to... (full context)
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As soon as Andrew is out of the room, Frank chastises Millie, evidently repulsed by her cold dismissal of... (full context)
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...stop him. She doesn’t understand his attitude. He tells her to go and look after Andrew, because “he’s just been about as badly hurt as a human being can be.” Millie... (full context)
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Millie accuses Frank of hypocrisy for suddenly caring about Andrew when Frank has been deceiving Andrew by sleeping with his wife. He says he only... (full context)
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Andrew comes back into the room. He hands Millie the bottle of medicine, which she holds... (full context)
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Frank tells Andrew that he will not be staying for dinner. Andrew pours himself a sherry and offers... (full context)
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...that, I do—very much.’” So, concludes Frank, the gift was probably not a cunning ploy. Andrew picks up the book and says: “Dear me! What a lot of fuss about a... (full context)
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Frank implores Andrew to believe him about Taplow’s intentions. Andrew reassures Frank that he is not “particularly concerned”... (full context)
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...Frank, Taplow won’t—and nor will he. Frank downs his drink and says goodbye. Frank offers Andrew a parting word of advice: “Leave your wife.” Andrew asks if that is just so... (full context)
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Frank is amazed to learn that Andrew already knew about his affair with Millie. It was Millie herself who told him, says... (full context)
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Frank calls Millie “evil.” Andrew says that isn’t a kind word to use about someone, so he hears, that Frank... (full context)
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Andrew jokingly calls Frank’s statement “delightfully chivalrous.” Frank again implores Andrew to leave Millie: “she’s out... (full context)
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Andrew goes into further detail about his and Millie’s marriage, telling Frank that both he and... (full context)
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Andrew says his situation is not nearly as “tragic” as Frank seems to imagine: “Merely the... (full context)
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Frank agrees to leave, but first he wants Andrew to say goodbye to him properly. Andrew walks over to him. Frank says he isn’t... (full context)
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Frank tells Andrew “a corpse can be revived.” Andrew responds that he doesn’t “believe in miracles.” Frank says... (full context)
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Frank heads to the door. He tells Andrew that he is “off to have a quick word with Taplow.” Frank asks Andrew whether... (full context)
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Just before he leaves, Frank gets Andrew to tell him what his new address will be. Millie comes in at this moment... (full context)
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After a moment’s silence, Millie laughs. She says it’s funny that Andrew has invited Frank to visit him. Andrew protests that Frank suggested the visit. Millie spitefully... (full context)
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Millie says indifferently that Andrew can do whatever he wants, and asks what makes him think she will join him... (full context)
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The phone rings, which Andrew picks up—it’s the headmaster, Dr. Frobisher. Andrew answers Dr. Frobisher’s questions about the timetable, before... (full context)