The Cherry Orchard

by

Anton Chekhov

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Madame Ranevsky’s youngest daughter, Anya, is seventeen years old and, like many of Chekhov’s young ingénue characters, a dreamer. She feels that happiness is just on the horizon, despite the intense financial and social struggles her family faces. Deeply loving and supportive of her mother, Anya insists even in the face of financial ruin and eviction from their ancestral home that her family will be able to make a “new life” for themselves somewhere else.

Anya Quotes in The Cherry Orchard

The The Cherry Orchard quotes below are all either spoken by Anya or refer to Anya. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Change Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Thrift edition of The Cherry Orchard published in 1991.
Act 1 Quotes

GAYEF: I’ll go [to the bank] on Tuesday and talk [the loan] over again. (To BARBARA) Don’t howl! (To ANYA) Your mamma shall have a talk with Lopakhin. Of course he won’t refuse her. And as soon as you are rested you must go to see your grandmother, the Countess, at Yaroslav. We’ll operate from three points, and the trick is done. We’ll pay the interest, I’m certain of it. (Taking sugar candy.) I swear on my honor, or whatever you will, the property shall not be sold. (Excitedly.) I swear by my hope of eternal happiness! There’s my hand on it. Call me a base, dishonorable man if I let it go to auction. I swear by my whole being.

Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 14-15
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 2 Quotes

ANYA: What have you done to me, Peter? Why is it that I no longer love the cherry orchard as I did? I used to love it so tenderly; I thought there was no better place on earth than our garden.

TROPHIMOF: […] Think, Anya, your grandfather, your great-grandfather and all your ancestors were serf-owners, owners of living souls. Do not human spirits look out at you from every tree in the orchard, from every leaf and every stem? Do you not hear human voices? …Oh! It is terrible. Your orchard frightens me. When I walk through it in the evening or at night, the rugged bark on the trees glows with a dim light, and the cherry trees seem to see all that happened a hundred and two hundred years ago in painful and oppressive dreams. […]

ANYA: The house we live in has long since ceased to be our house; and I shall go away, I give you my word.

TROPHIMOF: If you have the household keys, throw them in the well and go away. Be free, be free as the wind.

ANYA: How beautifully you put it!

Related Characters: Anya (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 26-27
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 3 Quotes

ANYA: Mamma! Are you crying, mamma? My dear, good, sweet mamma! Darling, I love you! I bless you! The cherry orchard is sold; it’s gone; it’s quite true, it’s quite true. But don’t cry, mamma, you’ve still got life before you, you’ve still got your pure and lovely soul. Come with me, darling; come away from here. We’ll plant a new garden, still lovelier than this. You will see it and understand, and happiness, deep, tranquil happiness will sink down on your soul, like the sun at eventide, and you’ll smile, mamma. Come, darling, come with me!

Related Characters: Anya (speaker), Madame Lyubof Andreyevna Ranevsky, Peter Trophimof
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 39
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 4 Quotes

ANYA (in the doorway): Mamma says, will you stop cutting down the orchard till she has gone.

TROPHIMOF: Really, haven’t you got tact enough for that?

(Exit TROPHIMOF by the hall.)

LOPAKHIN: Of course, I’ll stop them at once. What fools they are!

(Exit after TROPHIMOF.)

Related Characters: Yermolai Alexeyitch Lopakhin (speaker), Anya (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

(MADAME RANEVSKY and GAYEF remain alone [in the nursery.] They seem to have been waiting for this, throw their arms round each other’s necks and sob restrainedly and gently, afraid of being overheard.)

GAYEF (in despair): My sister! My sister!

MADAME RANEVSKY: Oh, my dear, sweet lovely orchard! My life, my youth, my happiness, farewell! Farewell!

ANYA (calling gaily, without) Mamma!

TROPHIMOF (gay and excited): Aoo!

MADAME RANEVSKY: One last look at the walls and the windows… Our dear mother sued to walk up and down this room.

GAYEF: My sister! My sister!

ANYA (without): Aoo!

MADAME RANEVSKY: We’re coming. (Exeunt.)

Related Characters: Madame Lyubof Andreyevna Ranevsky (speaker), Anya (speaker), Leonid Andreyitch Gayef (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Cherry Orchard PDF

Anya Character Timeline in The Cherry Orchard

The timeline below shows where the character Anya appears in The Cherry Orchard. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
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Love and Sentimentality Theme Icon
Ranevsky, her daughters Anya and Barbara, and Anya’s governess Charlotte enter the room in a bustle. Gayef (Ranevsky’s brother),... (full context)
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The group hurries from the room to explore the rest of the house; Anya and Dunyasha stay behind. As Dunyasha helps Anya remove her overcoat and hat, Anya complains... (full context)
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Anya describes arriving in Paris to find her mother living on the fifth floor of a... (full context)
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...a sound at the door. Barbara shakes her fist at him, and he goes away. Anya asks if Lopakhin has proposed to Barbara yet. Barbara answers that though everyone around seems... (full context)
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Loss, Grief, and Class Theme Icon
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...saucer. Yasha exits quickly. Barbara comes back in to ask what all the commotion is; Anya follows her, dreamily reflecting on the horrors their family has endured recently. Six years ago,... (full context)
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...feels he could die in peace now. Ranevsky, Lopakhin, Gayef, and Pishtchik reenter as well. Anya goes off to bed, kissing her mother and uncle goodnight. Barbara tells Lopakhin and Pishtchik... (full context)
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...their family to miraculously come into enough to support Ranevsky’s “illness” of being a spendthrift—perhaps Anya could marry a rich man, or perhaps they could beg money from their aunt in... (full context)
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Anya says she still can’t sleep. Gayef kisses Anya’s hands, crying, and apologizes for insulting her... (full context)
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...on the estate. He plans to go on Tuesday to talk with somebody. He urges Anya to try and get Ranevsky to ask Lopakhin for a loan in the meantime, and... (full context)
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Anya expresses her great relief and embraces her uncle. Firs enters the room—he seems to think... (full context)
Act 2
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Trophimof, Anya, and Barbara approach the field. Ranevsky embraces her daughters while Lopakhin teases Trophimof for being... (full context)
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Ranevsky urges everyone to head back to the house. She sees that Anya has tears in her eyes, and asks if she’s all right; Anya answers that she’s... (full context)
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Everyone but Trophimof and Anya heads back to the house; Anya says she’s grateful the bum came along since he... (full context)
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Anya asks Trophimof what he’s done to her—she no longer loves her once-precious cherry orchard. She... (full context)
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...difficult life marked by strife and inconstancy, he feels the approach of happiness at last. Anya, seemingly ignoring him, notes that the moon is rising. Offstage, Barbara calls for Anya to... (full context)
Act 3
Loss, Grief, and Class Theme Icon
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...everybody entertained. After a few tricks, she pulls out a shawl and shakes it out; Anya appears, as if by magic, behind it. Everyone applauds. Charlotte shakes out the shawl once... (full context)
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...already. Trophimof laments that Barbara has spent the whole summer trying to keep him and Anya apart even though the two of them are “above love.” (full context)
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The sound of a crash comes from another room, followed by Barbara and Anya’s screams and laughter—Anya runs in laughing about how Trophimof has fallen down the stairs. A... (full context)
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Ranevsky, needing a rest, returns to the sitting-room. Anya comes into the room—she reports that she has just heard someone in the kitchen saying... (full context)
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Anya and Trophimof enter the room; Anya goes to Ranevsky and kneels at her feet. She... (full context)
Act 4
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...to the hall, are several suitcases and bundles. Lopakhin stands alone in the room, waiting; Anya and Barbara’s voices can be heard in the hall as they bid the neighboring peasants... (full context)
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...if he’s heard that Gayef got a job at the bank; before Trophimof can answer, Anya appears in the doorway, and relays that Madame Ranevsky has asked if they can wait... (full context)
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Anya asks Yasha if Firs has gone to the hospital yet; Yasha replies that he told... (full context)
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Ranevsky, Gayef, Anya, and Charlotte enter the room. It is nearly time for them to go to the... (full context)
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Anya, who is going to a nearby university to study, promises to work very hard and... (full context)
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...ready to leave, she still has two things on her mind. She’s still worried about Firs—Anya reassures her that Firs has indeed been sent to the hospital. Ranevsky’s second worry is... (full context)
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...otherwise, she won’t make it to her new work appointment on time. Ranevsky calls for Anya to get ready; Anya, Gayef, and Charlotte enter along with Ephikhodof, who starts taking the... (full context)
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...sunnily states that it’s time for them all to start out on their new journeys. Anya, too, is excited. Trophimof comes in, followed by Lopakhin. They begin taking things out of... (full context)
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...embrace one another and sob quietly, lamenting the loss of their youth and happiness. Outside, Anya and Trophimof call for them excitedly. The siblings take one last look at the room,... (full context)