The Coquette

The Coquette

Eliza Wharton’s friend. Julia is a single woman, but unlike Eliza, she is looking forward to marriage and domestic life. She is beautiful and highly virtuous, and, according to Major Sanford, completely incapable of being seduced. The “dignity of her manners forbid all assaults upon her virtue,” Sanford says, and Julia is constantly urging Eliza to cease her coquettish ways. Like Eliza’s other friends, Julia is highly judgmental of Eliza’s flirtatious behavior, and she is often overly harsh and critical in her approach. Julia’s intolerance of Eliza’s relationship with Sanford is in large part why Eliza flees to Danvers after she becomes pregnant with Sanford’s illegitimate baby. Even after Julia learns of Eliza’s death at the inn at Danvers, she is still highly critical of Eliza and appears more sympathetic toward Mrs. Wharton than Eliza. While Julia certainly mourns the loss of her friend, she mourns Eliza’s lost virtue even more. “Not only the life, but what was still dearer,” Julia says, “the reputation and virtue of the unfortunate Eliza, have fallen victims at the shrine of libertinism!” Despite being a dear friend to Eliza, Julia is more concerned with Eliza’s reputation and virtue than she is with Eliza’s happiness and well-being.

Miss Julia Granby Quotes in The Coquette

The The Coquette quotes below are all either spoken by Miss Julia Granby or refer to Miss Julia Granby. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women and Society Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of The Coquette published in 2015.
Letter 66 Quotes

Indeed, I feared some immediate and fatal effect. I therefore seated myself beside her; and assuming an air of kindness, compose yourself, Eliza, said I; I repeat what I told you before, it is the purest friendship, which thus interests me in your concerns. This, under the direction of charity, induces me again to offer you my hand. Yet you have erred against knowledge and reason; against warning and counsel. You have forfeited the favor of your friends; and reluctant will be their forgiveness. I plead guilty, said she, to all your charges. From the general voice I expect no clemency. If I can make my peace with my mother, it is all I seek or wish on this side the grave.

Page Number: 120
Explanation and Analysis:
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Letter 69 Quotes

Should it please God to spare and restore me to health, I shall return, and endeavor, by a life of penitence and rectitude, to expiate my past offences. But should I be called from this scene of action; and leave behind me a helpless babe, the innocent sufferer of its mother’s shame, Oh, Julia, let your friendship for me extend to the little stranger! Intercede with my mother to take it under her protection; and transfer to it all her affection for me; to train it up in the ways of piety and virtue, that it may compensate her for the afflictions which I have occasioned!

Related Characters: Miss Eliza Wharton (speaker), Miss Julia Granby, Mrs. M. Wharton
Related Symbols: Babies
Page Number: 131
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Letter 73 Quotes

How sincerely I sympathize with the bereaved parent of the dear, deceased Eliza, I can feel, but have not power to express. Let it be her consolation, that her child is at rest. The resolution which carried this deluded wanderer thus far from her friends, and supported her through her various trials, is astonishing! Happy would it have been, had she exerted an equal degree of fortitude in repelling the first attacks upon her virtue! But she is no more; and heaven forbid that I should accuse or reproach her!

Page Number: 140
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Upon your reflecting and steady mind, my dear Julia, I need not inculcate the lessons which may be drawn from this woe-fraught tale; but for the sake of my sex in general, I wish it engraved upon every heart, that virtue alone, independent of the trappings of wealth, the parade of equipage, and the adulation of gallantry, can secure lasting felicity. From the melancholy story of Eliza Wharton, let the American fair learn to reject with disdain every insinuation derogatory to their true dignity and honor. Let them despise, and for ever banish the man, who can glory in the seduction of innocence and the ruin of reputation. To associate, is to approve; to approve, is to be betrayed!

Page Number: 141
Explanation and Analysis:
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Miss Julia Granby Character Timeline in The Coquette

The timeline below shows where the character Miss Julia Granby appears in The Coquette. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Letter XLVIII. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Women and Society Theme Icon
...thing that could possibly make Eliza feel better is a visit from their dear friend, Julia Granby, a request she hopes Lucy will relay to her. (full context)
Letter XLIX. to Miss Eliza Wharton.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
...now Lucy is happy to see the “returning empire of reason” reflected in Eliza’s behavior. Julia has accepted Eliza’s invitation. “She is a good girl,” Lucy says, “and her society will... (full context)
Letter L. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Eliza writes Lucy and tells her that Julia has arrived. “She is all that I once was,” Eliza says, “easy, sprightly, debonair.” Eliza... (full context)
Letter LI. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Friendship Theme Icon
“You commanded me to write you respecting Miss Wharton,” Julia writes to Lucy, “and I obey.” Julia claims that Eliza has completely changed, and that... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia tells Lucy that Major Sanford’s home is “undergoing a complete repair.” He is rumored to... (full context)
Letter LIII. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
...can ensure happiness.” Before this terrible news, Eliza says, she had achieved some “cheerfulness” with Julia’s help, but now it is lost. Eliza intends to travel with Julia to Boston for... (full context)
Letter LV. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
...had sent Eliza a letter requesting a visit once he returned to Hartford, and after Julia said there was no harm in it, Eliza agreed to meet him. He admitted that... (full context)
Letter LVI. To Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“Major Sanford has returned,” Julia writes to Lucy, “and amity (but not commerce,) is ratified.” Julia reports that Eliza is... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Julia recently met Sanford and “disliked him exceedingly.” She has “no charity for these reformed rakes.”... (full context)
Letter LVII. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
Eliza and Julia recently went to dine at Major and Mrs. Sanford’s, and Eliza writes Lucy to tell... (full context)
Letter LIX. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Eliza writes Lucy to tell her that, while Julia is headed to Boston, Eliza will not be joining them. She prefers to stay home... (full context)
Letter LX. to the same.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia writes Lucy and informs her that all her attempts to persuade Eliza to travel to... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia warned Eliza about her “visible fondness for the society of such a man.” Clearly, “marriage... (full context)
Letter LXI. to Miss Eliza Wharton.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia, you say, approves not Major Sanford’s particular attention to you,” Lucy writes Eliza. “Neither do... (full context)
Letter LXII. to Miss Julia Granby.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
Eliza writes one letter to both Julia and Lucy, who are both now in Boston. “Writing is an employment,” Eliza says, “which... (full context)
Letter LXIII. to Miss Eliza Wharton.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia writes Eliza and expresses her condolences for Mrs. Richman’s baby. She speaks briefly about her... (full context)
Letter LXIV. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Julia writes Lucy and informs her that she has arrived back at Eliza’s in Hartford. When... (full context)
Letter LXV. to Mr. Charles Deighton.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
...Sanford says. These events, however, bring Sanford “neither pain nor pleasure.” Sanford tells Charles that Julia Granby will be visiting Eliza soon. “Now there’s a girl, Charles, I should never attempt... (full context)
Letter LXVI. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“Oh, my friend,” Julia writes Lucy. “I have a tale to unfold!” While staying with Eliza, Julia noticed that... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“It is the purest friendship,” Julia told Eliza, “which thus interests me in your concerns.” Julia can’t understand how Eliza could... (full context)
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Despite Julia’s insistence that Eliza stay away from Major Sanford, Eliza claimed that she could not comply... (full context)
Letter LXVII. to the same.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“She is gone!” Julia writes to Lucy. “Yes, my dear friend, our beloved Eliza, is gone!” A few days... (full context)
Marriage and Social Mobility Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
...such a person, but she swore forgiveness no matter the offense. That night, Eliza gave Julia two letters—one for Mrs. Wharton, the other for Julia—and she made her promise not to... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Later, Julia woke to the sound of the front door and saw Eliza leave, followed by a... (full context)
Letter LXIX. to Miss Julia Granby.
Friendship Theme Icon
“My Dear Friend,” Eliza begins her letter to Julia. Eliza goes on to tell Julia that she has “reason to think [herself] in a... (full context)
Women and Society Theme Icon
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
...her indiscretions, but if she dies “and leaves behind [her] a helpless babe,” she begs Julia to “intercede with [her] mother to take it under her protection.” She also asks Julia... (full context)
Letter LXXI. to Mrs. Lucy Sumner.
Women and Society Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“The drama is now closed!” Julia writes to Lucy. “A tragical one indeed it has proved.” Recently, in a Boston newspaper,... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“I am told that Major Sanford is quite frantic,” Julia writes. His wife, Nancy, has left him, and he lost his mortgaged home when he... (full context)
Letter LXXIII. to Miss Julia Granby.
Friendship Theme Icon
Lucy immediately responds to Julia’s letter. She tells her that she “sincerely sympathizes” with Mrs. Wharton’s pain, and doesn’t have... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Lucy closes her letter, but first she tells Julia that she wishes “it engraved upon every heart, that virtue alone […] can secure lasting... (full context)
Letter LXXIV. to Mrs. M. Wharton.
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
“Dear Madam,” Julia writes Mrs. Wharton. Julia and Lucy have just returned from Danvers, where they visited Eliza’s... (full context)
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia bids Mrs. Wharton farewell and hopes that the stone “may alleviate [her] grief.” She tells... (full context)