The Coquette

The Coquette

The Coquette Letter 51 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
“You commanded me to write you respecting Miss Wharton,” Julia writes to Lucy, “and I obey.” Julia claims that Eliza has completely changed, and that her previous “vivacity has entirely forsaken her.” Eliza has turned into a “recluse,” and Julia has desperately been trying to cheer her up and get her out of the house. “Pray madam,” Julia tells Lucy, “write her often.” Friendship appears to be all Eliza has left.
Indeed, friendship is all Eliza has left, but her friends leave much to be desired. Lucy appears to think herself superior to Julia, since she “commands” Julia to write her and expects Julia to “obey.” Unlike Eliza, Julia bends to Lucy’s will easily enough.
Themes
Friendship Theme Icon
Julia tells Lucy that Major Sanford’s home is “undergoing a complete repair.” He is rumored to return soon, and bring his new wife, as well, although Eliza refuses to believe it. Julia hopes that, for Eliza’s own sake, “it will prove true.” Julia found Eliza in her room just the other day holding a small picture of Sanford. Eliza claims “neither to love, nor esteem him,” but she has forgiven him, Julia says. She closes her letter and tells Lucy to expect her back in Boston by winter.
Eliza is obviously pining over Sanford if she is staring at a picture of him so intently, and this is further proof of her unresolved feelings. Julia knows that Eliza will be heartbroken if Sanford is married, but Julia wishes for it anyway, which suggests she is more concerned with Eliza’s reputation and virtue than she is with her actual feelings or general happiness.
Themes
Sex and Virtue Theme Icon
Friendship Theme Icon