The Coquette

The Coquette

The Coquette Letter 48 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
“I am shipwrecked on the shoals of despair!” Eliza writes to Lucy. Eliza encloses a copy of her letter to Boyer and his answer and tells her friend about Reverend Boyer’s rejection. “But I do not blame Mr. Boyer,” Eliza says. “He has acted nobly.” Still, Eliza is regretful that she sent the letter to Boyer in the first place. “I have given him the power of triumphing in my distress!” she cries. The only thing that could possibly make Eliza feel better is a visit from their dear friend, Julia Granby, a request she hopes Lucy will relay to her.
Eliza’s depression is worsening, and now she is convinced that Boyer has “acted nobly,” which again reflects the patriarchy. Boyer was jealous, suspicious, and unrelentingly mean and intolerant, which is certainly not noble. But, since Boyer is a man and worthy of respect and esteem, Eliza gives him a pass and instead continues to punish herself.
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