The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by

Alexandre Dumas

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Count of Monte Cristo can help.

The Count of Monte Cristo: Chapter 81 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Andrea receives his monthly installment from his “father,” via the Count, who is managing the income for him by drawing on Danglars’ bank. Danglars is convinced that Andrea comes from not one but two rich families, maternal and paternal fortunes both, and so he is growing increasingly willing to marry Eugenie to Andrea. Although the Count appears to be in favor of this match for obscure reasons, he does not wish actually to broker it between Danglars and Andrea.
This is another important yet nearly unnoticeable feature of the Count’s behavior during his revenge plot. He does not wish to be the active agent who causes the marriage between Danglars’s daughter and Andrea. It’s not immediately clear why this is, but as we have seen in the Count’s behavior toward Mercedes, it must have something to do with his desire to appear as merely an observer rather than an agent in the vengeance that falls upon the plotters.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
Andrea gets word back home that Caderousse has refused his monthly “stipend” of 200 francs. Andrea goes to visit him in his little hut, where he is living as a “retired baker.” There, Caderousse says that he has known Danglars and Fernand for many years, although Andrea cannot believe this is true. He says that he wishes to leave Paris, and to do this he needs a nest egg. He asks Andrea to draw a plan of the Count’s house for him, which he does—it seems Caderousse is resolved to rob the Count while the Count is at Auteuil. Before Andrea leaves, Caderousse also asks that his monthly allowance be raised to 500 francs, and Andrea grudgingly agrees.
Caderousse has turned from a passive participant in the villainy of others – as during the initial plot against Dantes – to an active plotter himself. He believes that the Count possesses enormous wealth, and he wants some of that wealth. He is willing to do anything he can to grab some of it, even if it means manipulating Andrea into being his accomplice. It seems that a life of crime suits Caderousse after all, and that in Paris he is willing to live out-and-out as a criminal.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon