The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by

Alexandre Dumas

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The Count of Monte Cristo: Chapter 84 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Beauchamp visits Albert after their agreed-upon three weeks have passed, and reveals that he has spent these three weeks traveling out to Janina and back, to see whether there is any truth in the story touching on the reputation of his friend’s family. Albert is anxious to hear the news, and Beauchamp breaks it as gently as he can, and as a friend: that it is in fact true that Fernand betrayed the Ali Pasha to the Turks for “two thousand purses” and took that money to buy his title in Paris and establish his initial fortune.
Beauchamp has done the work that is necessary to verify his information. He is a punctilious man, and not unlike the Count in this regard, although Beauchamp is motivated only by a desire for knowledge of the truth, and not for vengeance. Nevertheless, Beauchamp understands that this information will come as a great blow to Albert, who is proud of his father and his family name.
Themes
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
Albert is dumbstruck at this news and does what he can to control himself as he thinks of a next step. Beauchamp implies that perhaps the Danglars family has been involved in this, hoping to discredit the marriage between Albert and Eugenie, and Albert does in fact relay that Eugenie and Andrea appear to be more or less officially engaged. Beauchamp suggests that the two go for a walk and check in on the Count, who is so good, Beauchamp says, at raising the spirits of those who are in need of help.
It is to Albert’s credit that he does not immediately lose his temper at Beauchamp, despite the latter being the bearer of truly horrible news. Both Beauchamp and Albert seem inherently to trust the Count, whom they believe to be a wise and fair judge of all things. Thus Albert, perhaps without even acknowledging it, believes the Count to be his ally in this affair.
Themes
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon