The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by

Alexandre Dumas

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The Count of Monte Cristo: Chapter 86 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Albert heads directly to the office of Beauchamp, who has been in Paris the last three days and followed the events closely. First Beauchamp visited the competing newspaper that ran the story connecting Fernand de Morcerf to the Ali Pasha incident—they confirmed that they had documentation supporting the event. Then Beauchamp went to the Upper House of the Chamber of Deputies, where Morcerf was called upon to defend himself.
Although Morcerf’s occupation was previously that of a soldier, at the present time he is a member of the political and ruling class in Paris, something of a gentleman-politician. For this reason, then, it is of the utmost importance that he publicly argues that he is not a treacherous and bloodthirsty individual, as these newspaper accounts claim.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
Morcerf requests that a commission be set up to adjudicate these claims, and the commission quickly comes into power, gathering information that day and meeting again that night. Morcerf defends himself, as Beauchamp reports to Albert, but he cannot produce a witness to say he was indeed faithful to the Ali Pasha until the end. At this, a witness against Fernand is announced—Haydee herself, the daughter of the Ali Pasha, and the Count’s slave.
Finally Haydee is granted an opportunity to tell her story publicly, just as she has told part of her story to Albert in the Count’s home on the Champs-Elysees. Here, the crowd seems at rapt attention, waiting for this mysterious woman to speak. Since Haydee’s debut in Paris society, she has only sat quietly beside the Count at public functions.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
Haydee recounts for the Chamber of Deputies the story she told Albert several chapters before, in which she witnessed Fernand’s treachery in selling over the Ali Pasha to the Turks to enrich himself. This story, which Haydee tells passionately and which accords with the independent and mysterious evidence the rival newspaper has received, prompts Fernand to flee the Chamber in anguish. The remaining members vote for him to be convicted of high treason, for going against the Greeks and consorting with the Turks, and Haydee walks very calmly out of the building, having exacted, as she says, revenge for the murder of her beloved father.
Haydee believes that she has fulfilled her own plot of vengeance – she has avenged her father’s death, after having been granted an opportunity to plead her case at the Chamber of Deputies. This vengeance of Haydee’s coincides, of course, with the vengeance of the Count, who also wishes for Fernand to be punished, although for a different crime – the crime of plotting against Dantes. This shared satisfaction in vengeance is yet another bond that unites the Count and Haydee.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Love, Devotion, and Redemption Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon