The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by

Alexandre Dumas

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The Count of Monte Cristo: Chapter 87 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Infuriated, Morcerf says that he must go to the man who set all these things in motion. He asks Beauchamp if he knows who could have planted the story at the rival paper, and Beauchamp says that during his trip to Janina, he heard that an emissary of Danglars’ was there just two weeks previously. Albert is instantly convinced that Danglars is behind the attack on his father’s name, and he goes to Danglars’ house to confront him.
Albert finds himself angry at the man who once plotted, along with his own father Fernand, to put Dantes in prison. The Count, though not directly involved in any of this activity, has nevertheless made it so that the families of the plotters have turned against each other. Now, it seems, the Count’s desire to stay out of active roles in these machinations makes more sense: he wants the other characters to avenge themselves on each other, as if he’s entirely uninvolved.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Love, Devotion, and Redemption Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
In front of Andrea, who is standing in the main receiving room, Albert challenges Danglars to admit to his wrongdoing against Fernand. Danglars says that it was really nothing personal, that he was only checking up on the family of the man who wished to marry his only daughter—and that, at any rate, he was encouraged to take this investigative step by the Count. Albert immediately puts together the Count’s role in this (living with Haydee, and ensuring that Albert and Haydee could meet and talk) and vows to Beauchamp to confront the Count before returning to Danglars.
In an intriguing turn, Danglars indicates that his investigation into Albert’s family was not entirely of his own initiative, and that the Count really is involved in the machinations from which he’s tried so hard to absent himself. Albert feels betrayed by a friend to whom he was devoted, and thus his dueling impulse has moved from Beauchamp, then to Danglars, and finally to the man to whom he’s closest: the Count.
Themes
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Love, Devotion, and Redemption Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon