The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Chapter 47 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
On the bus the day after Wellington’s death, Christopher sees four red cars in a row. He determines how good or bad his days will be by the colors of the cars he sees, and four red cars indicates a good day. Mr. Jeavons, the school psychologist, has questioned the logic of this method, particularly because Christopher is usually very logical. However, Christopher told him that his method is no different from people feeling happy or sad depending on the weather, even when they work in offices. Having things in a nice order is sometimes more important than logic. Mr. Jeavons called Christopher clever, but Christopher thinks he’s simply observant.
Christopher establishes a number of rules that govern his own personal world, and the significance of car colors is one of these rules. Although most readers probably agree initially with Mr. Jeavons that Christopher seems to act illogically on this point, Christopher forces the reader to see the absurdity of the socially accepted practice of connecting one’s feelings to the weather, no matter if a person is inside all the time. In this situation, having rules is more important for Christopher than the rules being logical.
Themes
Logic vs. Emotion Theme Icon
Perspective and the Absurdity of the World Theme Icon
Christopher told Mr. Jeavons that he wants to become an astronaut, and Mr. Jeavons replied that it’s very hard to do so. Christopher knows this, but still wants it. A boy named Terry once told him he would only get a job doing menial labor, but Ed said that Terry was only jealous of Christopher’s intelligence. Christopher plans to study math and physics at university, and he knows that Terry won’t even go to university.
Christopher has high aspirations, and he has already faced challenges to them. His interaction with Terry shows that he experiences bullying based on his autism, but also that he does not take other people’s taunts to heart. He’s confident in his own intelligence and abilities.
Themes
Growing Up Theme Icon
Because the cars indicated it’s a good day, Christopher plans to investigate Wellington’s death. He mentions this intention to Siobhan, who suggests that he write about his experience finding Wellington dead. Thus, Christopher begins writing the account the reader has just read.
Christopher actually decides what to do depending on what kind of day the car colors indicate it is. Furthermore, the reader realizes that Christopher is not writing with knowledge of the entire story, but instead as he lives the events.
Themes
Growing Up Theme Icon
Perspective and the Absurdity of the World Theme Icon