The Decameron

The Decameron

by

Giovanni Boccaccio

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Decameron can help.
Bartolomea is Ricciardo di Chinzica’s dissatisfied wife in Dioneo’s second tale (II, 10). Her marriage is so boring that she’s happy to be captured by the pirate Paganino, and she demonstrates both female sexuality and also spunk and autonomy when she refuses to recognize Riccardo or return home with him.
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Bartolomea Character Timeline in The Decameron

The timeline below shows where the character Bartolomea appears in The Decameron. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Day 2: Tenth Tale
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Moderation and Excess Theme Icon
...di Chinzica wants a young, beautiful wife, even though he’s brainy, not brawny. His wife, Bartolomea, is pretty and charming—at least by Pisan standards. But just consummating the marriage nearly kills... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
One hot day, Ricciardo takes Bartolomea and some of her lady-friends on a fishing expedition. They are surprised by Paganino de... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Paganino, unable to comfort Bartolomea with words, eventually turns to comforting her with deeds—since he’s not the kind of man... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
...agree that if Paganino’s lover recognizes Ricciardo, Paganino will hand her over. Ricciardo, confident that Bartolomea will of course recognize her beloved husband, is surprised when she ignores him completely. Assuming... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Moderation and Excess Theme Icon
Thinking Bartolomea may be afraid of Paganino, Ricciardo asks to speak to her alone. Bartolomea finally admits... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Faith vs. Religion Theme Icon
Ricciardo can’t understand why Bartolomea would rather live as Paganino’s whore than as his wife, casting away her honor and... (full context)
Love and Sex Theme Icon
...wanders the streets saying, “there’s no rest for the bar.” After his death, Paganino and Bartolomea marry and labor daily, regardless of holidays. Based on this example, Dioneo concludes, Bernabò’s faith... (full context)