The Enemy

Hana is Dr. Sadao Hoki’s wife. The couple met at a university in America, but “waited to fall in love” until their parents back in Japan could properly approve of and arrange the marriage. Hana shows a deep love for Japanese customs and the old way of living, seen through her traditional house (peppered with patios and courtyards) and her role as a subservient housewife. She largely bends to Sadao’s will, often without resentment, and upholds him as the head of the household. Hana’s main task is overseeing the servants—who, in turn, tend to her household and children—and ensuring that her husband is always fed first and taken care of. Although she appears less overtly racist than her husband, she too distains Tom for being white and American. She is also more afraid of going against the cultural grain by dangerously housing and saving the white man, who is clearly a prisoner of war. Tom makes her uncomfortable and anxious, both because of his Americanness and because his presence poses a severe threat to her and Sadao’s safety, given that aiding a prisoner of war and political enemy is against the law. Nonetheless, she finds herself taking care of the American even though she doesn’t really want to, washing him tenderly while thinking racist thoughts. Hana, like Sadao, demonstrates the human impulse to be altruistic and take care of fellow humans, but also shows how racial prejudice and nationalism cloud such thinking.

Hana Quotes in The Enemy

The The Enemy quotes below are all either spoken by Hana or refer to Hana. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the National Council of Education Research and Training edition of The Enemy published in 2015.
The Enemy Quotes

He had met Hana in America, but he had waited to fall in love with her until he was sure she was Japanese. His father would never have received her unless she had been pure in her race […] they had not married heedlessly in America. They had finished their work at school and had come home to Japan, and when his father had seen her the marriage had been arranged in the old Japanese way, although Sadao and Hana had talked everything over beforehand.

Related Characters: Dr. Sadao Hoki, Hana, Sadao’s Father
Page Number: 25-26
Explanation and Analysis:
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“What shall we do with this man?” Sadao muttered. But his trained hands seemed of their own will to be doing what they could to stanch the fearful bleeding. He packed the wound with the sea moss that strewed the beach. […]

“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself. Now that the bleeding was stopped for a moment he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.

“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.

Related Characters: Dr. Sadao Hoki (speaker), Hana (speaker), Tom / The American
Page Number: 27-28
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sadao hesitated again. “The strange thing is,” he said, “that if the man were whole I could turn him over to the police without difficulty. I care nothing for him. He is my enemy. All Americans are my enemy. And he is only a common fellow. You see how foolish his face is. But since he is wounded…”

“You cannot throw him back to the sea,” Hana said.

Related Characters: Dr. Sadao Hoki (speaker), Hana (speaker), Tom / The American
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Watching him, she wondered if the stories they heard sometimes of the sufferings of prisoners were true. They came like flickers of rumour, told by word of mouth and always contradicted. In the newspapers the reports were always that wherever the Japanese armies went the people received them gladly, with cries of joy at their liberation. But sometimes she remembered such men as General Takima, who at home beat his wife cruelly, though no one mentioned it now that he had fought so victorious a battle in Manchuria. If a man like that could be so cruel to a woman in his power, would he not be cruel to one like this for instance?

Related Characters: Hana, Tom / The American, General Takima
Related Symbols: Tom’s Scars
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:
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Hana Character Timeline in The Enemy

The timeline below shows where the character Hana appears in The Enemy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Enemy
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...and admires the mist “wreathing around the pines” and “creeping up the beach.” His wife, Hana, joins him outside, quietly wrapping him into an embrace. Sadao thinks back to how he... (full context)
Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Sadao and Hana met at their college professor’s house. The kindly professor and his wife had been “anxious... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Although they “had talked everything over beforehand,” Sadao and Hana waited to marry until they had both finished school, returned to Japan, and ensured that... (full context)
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Back in the present, Sadao and Hana suddenly notice “something black” in the mist and realize it’s a man. He slogs through... (full context)
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...the sand. He turns the unconscious man’s head and peers into his face—with a gasp, Hana and Sadao see that he is white. The man’s soggy cap falls off, revealing a... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...stanch the fearful bleeding.” After packing the wound sufficiently with sea moss, Sadao turns to Hana and declares that “the best thing” would be to toss the man back into the... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Sadao says that if they brought the man into their house, both Sadao and Hana would be arrested; however, if they turned the man over to the Japanese authorities, the... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
After a moment, Hana says they need to put the man back into the sea, though she refuses to... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Sadao wonders what they’ll tell the servants; Hana says they “must” tell the servants that they’re only bringing the man into the house... (full context)
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Sadao and Hana bring the man to the room that once belonged to Sadao’s father. The room is... (full context)
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Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
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Sadao and Hana agree that Yumi, the servant who tends to the children, should be the one to... (full context)
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Sadao swiftly leaves the room, and Hana follows, not wanting “to be left alone with the white man.” Although she went to... (full context)
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...gardener about the white man. When Sadao is out of earshot, the gardener firmly tells Hana that Sadao “ought not to” help a white man, and that the man “ought to... (full context)
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Hana and Yumi go to the white man, and Hana instructs the servant girl to wash... (full context)
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Sadao enters dressed in his surgeon’s coat and carrying his tools. He tersely orders Hana to get towels, and she does so “obediently.” She also runs to get extra blankets... (full context)
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Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
Hana runs out of the room, and Sadao hears her throwing up in the garden. He... (full context)
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Hana returns, and Sadao teaches her how to administer the anesthetic. As she brings the saturated... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
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Hana also thinks of General Takima, who is now a celebrated war hero in public even... (full context)
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Sadao sharply tells Hana to stop administering anesthetic. Meanwhile, Sadao fills a vial with liquid and stabs it into... (full context)
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The white man’s eyes open, and he looks terrified. Hana feeds him by hand, since none of the servants will do so. As she lifts... (full context)
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Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
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Later, Hana anxiously tells Sadao that the servants have threatened to quit if the white man stays... (full context)
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...to use, since “Blood is the best of fertilisers.” Meanwhile, Yumi says that Sadao and Hana are failing to consider their children’s wellbeing: “What will be their fate if their father... (full context)
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Hana knows that her servants are right, but there’s also a strange part of her that... (full context)
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Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
After a week, the servants band together and all leave on the same day. Hana is devastated but doesn’t show it. The servants are all crying—the cook and the gardener... (full context)
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That afternoon, a messenger in uniform arrives, sending Hana into a panic—the servants must have told the authorities about Tom. However, the messenger tells... (full context)
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Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...Tom and do away with his body. Sadao agrees and privately decides not to tell Hana about the plan, as the idea of having assassins in the house would only increase... (full context)
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...the third night, Sadao awakens to the sound of a loud crash; he sharply tells Hana to stay put and not investigate the sound. In the morning, Sadao peeks into the... (full context)
Humanization, Kindness, and Antagonism Theme Icon
...it with supplies. He then returns home as if he has just returned from work. Hana serves him his dinner (even though she is “so modern,” she doesn’t eat with her... (full context)