The Enemy

Dr. Sadao Hoki’s father is dead from the outset of the story, but his presence lingers throughout the story due to Sadao’s reflections and the servants’ loyalty to their “old master.” At the start of the story, Sadao thinks about how his harsh, domineering father, “who never joked or played with him,” pushed Sadao toward the best education possible, even if that meant sending him to a university in America. In life, Sadao’s father was a Japanese nationalist who believed firmly in racial purity—Sadao could only marry Hana if she was purely Japanese. He cleaved to the “old Japanese way” of doing things, seen by the way he properly arranged Sadao and Hana’s marriage (even though they met in college in America) and ensured that his bedroom was outfitted in a traditional Japanese fashion and contained only Japanese-made furniture and goods. The cook and the gardener both worked for Sadao’s father when Sadao was just a little boy, and as such they are far more loyal to their “old master” than the “young master.” When Tom enters into the picture, it is this loyalty to Sadao’s father (plus an understandable dose of fear of being seen as traitors by the authorities) that lead the gardener and the cook to quit and leave the household after several decades of working there. When Tom “escapes” (that is, when Sadao helps him steal away to a nearby island where he’s bound to be picked up by a Korean fishing boat), the servants return, suggesting that their roots in the household and their devotion to Sadao’s father’s memory was far too deep to sever permanently.

Sadao’s Father Quotes in The Enemy

The The Enemy quotes below are all either spoken by Sadao’s Father or refer to Sadao’s Father. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the National Council of Education Research and Training edition of The Enemy published in 2015.
The Enemy Quotes

He had met Hana in America, but he had waited to fall in love with her until he was sure she was Japanese. His father would never have received her unless she had been pure in her race […] they had not married heedlessly in America. They had finished their work at school and had come home to Japan, and when his father had seen her the marriage had been arranged in the old Japanese way, although Sadao and Hana had talked everything over beforehand.

Related Characters: Dr. Sadao Hoki, Hana, Sadao’s Father
Page Number: 25-26
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sadao’s Father Character Timeline in The Enemy

The timeline below shows where the character Sadao’s Father appears in The Enemy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Enemy
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...frequent visits to the islands of the South Seas. On every visit to the islands, Sadao’s father would say, “Those islands yonder, they are the stepping stones to the future for Japan.”... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Growing up, Sadao’s father never “joked or played” with Sadao but “spent infinite pains upon him who was his... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...“had waited to fall in love with her until he was sure she was Japanese.” Sadao’s father never would have approved of the marriage had Hana not been “pure in her race.” (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
...waited to marry until they had both finished school, returned to Japan, and ensured that Sadao’s father could arrange the marriage according to “the old Japanese way.” They’ve been happily married for... (full context)
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Sadao and Hana bring the man to the room that once belonged to Sadao’s father . The room is still in immaculate condition, outfitted only with Japanese goods—“Everything here had... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
...runs to get extra blankets with which they can protect the expensive floor coverings in Sadao’s father ’s room. When she returns, however, the floor is already soaked with blood. “As if... (full context)
Decisions and Duty Theme Icon
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
...a long time. He once created “one of the finest moss gardens in Japan” for Sadao’s father , and swept it so frequently that not even a single pine needle touched its... (full context)
Racism and Nationalism Theme Icon
Soon the servants return to the household. Yumi insists on burning Sulphur in Sadao’s father ’s room to purify it and get rid of “the white man’s smell.” Besides this,... (full context)