The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Acrasia Character Analysis

Acrasia is an evil, pleasure-seeking sorceress who lives in the Bower of Bliss and who is the main antagonist of Book II. Since Book II is about the temperate Sir Guyon, Acrasia represents the opposite of temperance, luring men like Sir Mordant to their deaths by causing them to seek too much pleasure. Ultimately, she is defeated by Sir Guyon, which demonstrates the superiority of the virtue of temperance.

Acrasia Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Acrasia or refer to Acrasia. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book II: Canto I Quotes

His carriage was full comely and upright,
His countenance demure and temperate,
But yet so sterne and terrible in sight,
That cheard his friends, and did his foes amate:
He was an Elfin borne of noble state
[…]

Him als accopanyd upon the way
A comely Palmer, clad in blacke attire,
Of ripest years, and haries all hoarie gray

Page Number: 206
Explanation and Analysis:
Book II: Canto XII Quotes

Said Guyon, See the mind of beastly man,
That hath so soone forgot the excellence
Of his creation, when he life began,
That now he chooseth, with vile difference
To be a beast, and lack intelligence

Related Characters: Sir Guyon (speaker), Acrasia, The Palmer
Page Number: 382
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Faerie Queene PDF

Acrasia Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Acrasia appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book II: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...the corpse beside her). Sir Mordant’s misfortune began when he met a false sorceress named Acrasia. Acrasia lured men to an island where she made them drunk with pleasure so that... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amavia disguised herself as a pilgrim to sneak onto Acrasia’s island and try to find Sir Mordant. She found him enchanted by Acrasia’s evil charms.... (full context)
Book II: Canto II
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...who is noble and great. He also relates the story of Amavia, Sir Mordant, and Acrasia, telling how he has vowed revenge on Acrasia. All the guests are fascinated by his... (full context)
Book II: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
...Sir Guyon gets up and decides to continue on his quest to get vengeance on Acrasia. He decides to name the orphan baby Ruddymane. Sir Guyon walks because his horse was... (full context)
Book II: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...knight who has won glory in many perilous fights. His lady is the evil sorceress Acrasia (the same one Sir Guyon has been searching for to avenge Amavia). When Atin arrives,... (full context)
Book II: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...so that he can better serve her. Sir Guyon tells Arthur about the evil sorceress Acrasia and how he is planning to get revenge on her. (full context)
Book II: Canto XII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...away with his staff. At last, they make it to the Bower of Bliss, where Acrasia dwells.  (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Guyon and the Palmer make it to the part of the Bower of Bliss where Acrasia resides. Birds, voices, instruments, and all of nature seem to sing out together. Acrasia is... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Guyon and the Palmer sneak up on Acrasia and her lover. Then, all of a sudden, they rush forward and throw a net... (full context)
Book III: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...at Alma’s castle and has finally recovered from his battle wounds. Meanwhile, Sir Guyon sends Acrasia back in chains to the Faerie Queene and decides to go traveling with Arthur. They... (full context)