The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Amoretta (Amoret) Character Analysis

Amoretta (sometimes also called Amoret) is a beautiful maiden and a twin sister of Belphoebe, who is taken from her nymph mother at a young age and raised by Venus. Sir Scudamore falls in love with Amoretta when he sees her in the temple of Venus, but eventually they get separated. Britomart helps protect Amoretta from an enchanter named Busirane who torments her until eventually she is at last reunited with Scudamore.

Amoretta (Amoret) Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Amoretta (Amoret) or refer to Amoretta (Amoret). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book III: Canto XII Quotes

But Britomart uprearing her from ground,
Said, Gentle Dame, reward enough I weene
For many labours more, then I have found,
This, that in safety now I have you seen,
And meane of your deliverance have beene

Related Characters: Britomart (speaker), Sir Scudamore, Amoretta (Amoret)
Page Number: 560
Explanation and Analysis:
Book IV: Canto I Quotes

Of lovers sad calamities of old,
Full many piteous stories doe remaine,
But none more piteous ever was ytold,
Then that of Amorets hart-binding chaine,
And this of Florimels unworthie paine

Page Number: 383
Explanation and Analysis:
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Amoretta (Amoret) Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Amoretta (Amoret) appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book III: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Her mother is a fairy named Chrysogonee, who also gave birth to Belphoebe’s twin sister, Amoretta (also sometimes called Amoret). Chrysogonee is actually a virgin who fell asleep in the grass... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...decide to each take a twin, with Diana naming hers Belphoebe and Venus naming hers Amoretta. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Venus raises Amoretta in the beautiful Garden of Adonis. The garden contains all sorts of creatures, which are... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...to be with Psyche (his wife) and Pleasure (his daughter). There, Psyche also helps raise Amoretta next to Pleasure. Amoretta will grow up to be a noble, chaste lady. She’ll eventually... (full context)
Book III: Canto XI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...ground with his equipment scattered everywhere. The knight, whose name is Scudamore, tells her about Amoretta, his love who has been taken captive by an evil man named Busirane. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Britomart goes to comfort him. She pledges to help him against his foe and deliver Amoretta back to him. She tells Scudamore to get up and put his armor back on. (full context)
Book III: Canto XII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...enchanter in front of her. It turns out the woman is Cruelty, who is actually Amoretta, and the enchanter tormenting her is Busirane. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Busirane sees Britomart and goes to stab Amoretta, but Britomart stops him. They fight and she smites him down half-dead. Britomart tells Busirane... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amoretta praises Britomart for saving her and tries to thank her, but Britomart says she needs... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
In the 1596 revised version of Book XII’s ending, Britomart goes outside with Amoretta and finds that Scudamore and his squire have left to go find their own way... (full context)
Book IV: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The narrator summarizes how Britomart saved Amoretta from Busirane and brought her back to Scudamore, adding some new details to the story.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...becomes amazement when Britomart takes off her helm and reveals that she is a woman. Amoretta is also surprised and relieved because she wants to stay loyal to Scudamore even though... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Happy to be saved by Britomart, that night Amoretta sleeps in the same bed with her. In the morning, they head out and come... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Paridell and Blandamour are both enchanted by Amoretta, but soon Scudamore comes riding onto the scene. Paridell challenges Scudamore but gets knocked to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...domination. Ate, however, laughs at all the knights, saying that while they’re all arguing over Amoretta, she is faithless and already loves someone else. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore accuses Ate of lying. Duessa, however, says that she did in fact see Amoretta kissing another knight. Although Duessa is lying, she succeeds in riling up Scudamore’s anger against... (full context)
Book IV: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...(who is with Cambell), Canacee (who is with Triamond), Duessa (who is with Paridell), and Amoretta (who is with Britomart) are all in contention, but the most impressive participant is false... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Squire of Dames to laugh, since it means all these ladies are unvirtuous. At last, Amoretta manages to successfully wear the belt. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...already made him an enemy. Though Britomart is glad to have a virtuous companion like Amoretta, Amoretta still longs to be reunited with Scudamore. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore himself, however, seeks vengeance against Britomart because he jealously believes that she has made Amoretta unfaithful (despite Glauce’s insistence that that’s not the case). Scudamore and Glauce travel together until... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...and begin to feel passion for each other. Meanwhile, Scudamore is still worried about his Amoretta, so he asks Britomart if she has any news. Britomart says she isn’t sure; after... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore is disappointed and scared to hear of Amoretta’s disappearance. Britomart promises to help him find her and to enact vengeance on whoever took... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...it happened to Florimell, it happened to Britomart, and now it’s about to happen to Amoretta. After leaving the tournament, Britomart and Amoretta are traveling through the woods when, all of... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amoretta’s captor is a wild-looking “savage” man with hair everywhere and huge teeth who is known... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amoretta pities Aemylia but asks how she’s been able to hold on to her own honor... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Soon, the carle comes back, and Amoretta decides she’s going to run. She flees through the forest with the carle chasing her.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias and the carle fight, with the “savage” man using his club and even using Amoretta as a human shield. But Timias manages to injure the man, and he throws Amoretta... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...neck that kills him. She frees his prisoners from the den and heads back to Amoretta and Timias. When she gets back, she finds Timias kissing Amoretta and tending to her... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...squire Timias. He happens to come to a place in the woods where Aemylia and Amoretta are staying. He is moved because both of them seem seriously injured after escaping the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthur wants to find the virgin, so he, Amoretta, and Aemylia go looking. They come to a cottage where a foul-looking old woman named... (full context)
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British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The next morning, Arthur, Amoretta, and Aemylia leave, but Sclaunder follows after them, shouting insults, until at last she has... (full context)
Book IV: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthur rides on with Amoretta. Eventually, they cross paths with a troop of six riders: false Florimell, Braggadochio, a knight... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Britomart says she has lost her former love, a gentle maid (meaning Amoretta), and Scudamore regrets Amoretta’s loss even more. (Though Amoretta was with Arthur, she’s not at... (full context)
Book IV: Canto X
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...gold near it is the message that whoever possesses the shield will also possess fair Amoretta. Scudamore is eager to get the shield, so he challenges one of the knights on... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Shamefastness, Cheerfulness, Modesty, Courtesy, Silence, and Obedience are also there. Sitting on Womanhood’s lap is Amoretta herself. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
As soon as Scudamore sees Amoretta, his heart begins to throb. While it seems sacrilegious to him to interrupt, he goes... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amoretta asks for Scudamore to let go of her hand, sometimes crying, sometimes smiling, but he... (full context)